Get Social:

Reid Peppard

img_1153

Yes, that is a guinea pig comb/head piece. It was created by Reid Peppard, a British taxidermist. Her pieces take animals commonly perceived as vile pests and turns them into fashion items. Peppard says, “…when they become sculptural headpieces, necklaces and cuff-links, the specimens cease to be waste and become objects to behold. RP/ENCORE makes use of the city’s leftovers.” Would you be comfortable wearing this stuff?

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Hirotoshi Ito’s Rocks and Stones Look Like Anything But

Hirotoshi Ito Sculpture9 Hirotoshi Ito Sculpture1

When not attending to his family’s masonry business, Hirotoshi Ito turns a more playful eye to the stones of his work day.  Hirotoshi deftly works stone transforming it into sculptures that appear to be anything but the hard material.  Rocks look as if they’re thin skinned pouches, melting like butter, and laughing faces.  Hirotoshi’s sculptures – their playful forms and use of material – betray the artists sense of humor and a desire to pleasantly surprise the viewer.  Indeed, the artist’s statement says that his work welcomes  a laugh and a smile.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Kyle Fisher’s Autonomous Grain

 

Philadelphia’s Kyle Fisher creates paintings on wood that move in and out of the grain with a mind of their own, compositions that present themselves boldly to the world while receding into contemplative distance all at once.

Deliberate, but slickly nonchalant, they could totally pass as the love-child of an Audrey Kawaski ageless vixen and a Mr. Jago aerosol android. But that description wouldn’t go anywhere near properly crediting these immersive works, which stand well enough on their own.

Fisher is a co-founder of Part Time Studios, a great gallery/collective in Philly.

Currently Trending

The New Beauty: Aleah Chapin’s Unabashed Paintings Of Nude Women

Aleah Chapin - oil on linen

Aleah Chapin - oil on linen

Aleah Chapin - oil on linen

Aleah Chapin - oil on linen

Aleah Chapin‘s oil painting series The Aunties is an intimate, realistic, immodest look at a women’s world, as seen and experienced by a woman. The models featured are actually the artist’s mother’s friends, women who she has grown up with, and with whom she has a personal, unadulterated knowledge of. Chapin hasn’t spared any detail in her oversized portraits – we see the female figure in all of it’s beauty. Breasts are saggy, stomach rolls are bunched up, stretchmarks are on full display, pubic hair untamed and exposed, and thighs are dimpled with fatty cellulite.

Full of tender moments between mother and son, or groups of friends, her work is a strong counterpoint to the idealized and unrealistic female body images we are confronted with daily. She says about the subject:

Most women have issues and I’m not immune to that. We’re told that our bodies are supposed to be a ‘certain height, certain size, certain weight’. But the pictures we see are completely unrealistic; they’re very Photoshopped. We all know it when we look at them in magazines and yet, we still compare ourselves. That’s why we need images that show all sorts of bodies – so we can accept every size and shape. (Source)

Chapin paints women in a playful, relaxed, completely natural state. She tries to capture a childlike spirit, which is in all of us, no matter our age or gender. She says:

We generally care more what we look like – probably too much at times, me included. Young women are still trying to fit in. I think when you get older you care less –that’s not a negative thing at all. You’re just more accepting. When you get past a certain age you become invisible – and that’s a whole other problem. For me, it’s about finding beauty in every imperfection. (Source) (Via Hi Fructose)

Currently Trending

Chinese Artist Vacuums Beijing’s Polluted Air for 100 Days And Creates A Brick Out Of His Findings

day-98day-83e7acace4b889e58d81e585ade5a4a9 e7acace585abe58d81e585ade5a4a9

Climate control has been a controversial and momentous topic, well, for at at least two decades, but, the issue of global warming seems to be re-trending in light of the the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris. One tactic of addressing the issue’s importance, as we have seen, has been the thousands of activists marching all over the world (and the silent protest in Paris due to recent events). However, a Chinese performance artist who goes by the name “Nut Brother” has decided to take a more quantitative and perhaps informative approach. Beijing, the capital of China (the country that has largest CO2 emissions in the world), is a city of industrial smog. The artist announced a plan to literally vacuum the dust from the Beijing’s air for four hours a day, for 100 days in a row. As a performance, the artist walked the streets, starting in late July, with a pony tail, often a respirator mask, and vacuum with suction nozzle held in his hand to collect debris. On November 30th, the last day of his project, he gathered all 100 days worth of dust and brought it to a brick factory to be mixed with clay and turned into an alarming soot filled brick. Nut Brother is aware that he is not actually changing the air quality, however, he hopes his project will provoke passerby’s to consider their relationship to the environment and their surroundings. (via QUARTZ)

Currently Trending

Scott Greenwalt’s Gruesome Mixed Media Paintings

Scott Greenwalt is an Oakland-based painter whose mixed media works walk the line between geometric order and gruesome chaos. His palette often resembles that of our most decay-prone biological structures and fluids: the dirty beige of crumbling skulls, the electric pink of strained arteries, and the bright green of runny mucus. His compositions exist within empty landscapes or without any background context at all. And it should be hard to look at his work for too long. It hits so hard that we should be running for the hills. Instead, probably due to his immense level of skill, it’s hard to look away. Peep some recent work from the artist below.

Currently Trending