Get Social:

Peter Kogler’s Intricate Installations Transform Spaces Into A Vortex Of Warped, Optical Illusions

Peter Kogler - Installation/Paint

Peter Kogler - Installation/Paint

optical  Installation

Artist Peter Kogler takes ordinary spaces and converts them into optical illusions with little more than paint and projections. His installations completely encompass the gallery room or public space in which they inhabit and cause it to appear warped, stretched, distorted and twisted. These eye-tricking spaces devour the viewer in their endless lines and pattern while they creates a disorienting effect. Each strategically placed line is created by paint, but also sometimes by a projection onto the walls. Because Kogler’s patterns and lines are often on every side of the space, including the ceiling and floor, they create a powerful and overwhelming environment. The wall-to-wall spaces are completely taken over by lined grids, tubes weaving around each other, and swirling scribbles that create funhouse walls.

The settings for Kogler’s elaborate and impressive installations vary from gallery rooms to subway tunnels. One can truly get lost in these complex compositions trailing all over each wall. Each installation is like a beautiful labyrinth that entraps and engulfs the viewer. Kogler’s work uses mostly bold colors like white and black, and sometimes red. This creates a harsh, stark contrast that allows the optical illusion to be more apparent with a highly dramatic feel. The artist’s talent does not only lie in his incredible installations, but also his sculpture and two-dimensional work. His use of geometrics and line is similar in his other work, which makes them look absolutely stunning when they are exhibited within his installations. Kogler’s multifaceted style compliments whichever medium he desires.(via Illusion.scene360)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Superheroes Wearing Nothing But Dynamic Splashes Of Colored Milk

Jaroslav Wieczorkiewicz - Digital C-Print

Jaroslav Wieczorkiewicz - Digital C-Print

Jaroslav Wieczorkiewicz - Digital C-Print

Artist Jaroslav Wieczorkiewicz uses unlikely elements to construct his unbelievable and complex photographs of superheroes, or Splash Heroes. However, unlike normal superheroes, his heroes are not wearing ordinary uniforms, but outfits created from splashes of colored milk. Each constructed photograph contains a confident, strong superwoman posed in a capable and superior pose. Even more impressive, the liquid was not just simply digitally edited onto all of the models, but actually thrown onto them during the photo shoot. Wieczorkiewicz created this liquid clothing with splashes of milk with food coloring. Splashes are thrown in different places of the body in order to fabricate multifaceted outfits to mimic how real clothing may fit. This process demands an extreme amount of time and patience in order to create such a flawless result. In fact, each photograph is created from layering and editing together about 200 images. These many photos are layered over each other to form the finished photograph.

This is not the first series of milk-covered women that photographer Wieczorkiewicz has done. He has also created a similar series containing pin-up girls dressed in splashes of white milk. In this most recent series, Splash Heroes, Wieczorkiewicz’s work is pushed to a more dynamic level full of energy, movement, and dramatic color. The deep, glossy colors of liquid add a powerful vibe that gives the women a demanding presence. Each woman superhero is in mid-motion as their milk-suits swirl and travel around their bodies, creating a force field of milk. Wieczorkiewicz has all of his Splash Heroes available in a calendar, one for each month. (via Faith is Torment)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Saurabha Datta Has Developed A Device That Can Teach Anyone How To Draw

saurabh datta product designsaurabh datta product designsaurabh datta product designsaurabh datta product design
A designer/civil engineer named Saurabha Datta has developed a prototype for a device that can teach you how to draw. The machine aptly named “Teacher”, wraps around your hand and guides it to the perfect line.  The project developed for Datta’s thesis at Copenhagen’s Institute Of Interactive Design, first came about when he made a series of devices that guided people through simple tasks such as hitting a few piano keys or drawing a geometrically correct shape. The breakthrough in Datta’s research is taking a concept once thought of as sci-fi fodder and bringing it into reality.

“Teacher” looks similar to the old lie detector tests that would record a person’s pulse rate when asked a series of intimidating questions. It doesn’t say how heavy it is or what the projected weight would be but to be successful it would have to be lightweight. Some of the other projects Datta has worked on include making an interactive car seat that can respond to your insecurities and a program called “moment” which records your feelings at different times of the day.

Machines and computers are known as aids in making our lives easier and less stressful. With this latest development we can witness their evolution as was predicted some 50 years ago in Stanley Kurbrick’s 2001 a space odyssey. Who can forget the calm voiced computer “Hal” who eventually takes over the ship and responds with emotional vengeance against the crew when it learns they were going to “disconnect him.” If they can teach people how to draw what could be next on the horizon? Teaching you how to be a neurosurgeon or a concert pianist? Only time will tell. (via Juxtapoz)

Currently Trending

Richard Sweeney’s Intricate Paper Sculptures Are Incredibly Made Without Glue

Richard Sweeney - paper sculptureRichard Sweeney - paper sculptureRichard Sweeney - paper sculpture  Richard Sweeney - paper sculpture

Looking like a set of architecture models for a Gaudi building, Richard Sweeney‘s paper sculptures are organic, poetic, intricate, and mostly made without the aid of glue or tape. Taking his inspiration from the shapes and forms that occur in nature – like clouds, mounds of snow, he folds paper into beautiful geometric pieces. Not confined to working on a small scale, Sweeney also constructs wonderfully complex forms that hang from the ceiling to the floor.

He was recently part of a show called Above The Fold, and is a part of a group of talented modern day origami masters. Taking the ancient art of paper folding to a new level, Sweeney and his contemporaries are redefining the limits of what can be done with paper. Biological structures, and the essence of form and function are Sweeney’s inspirations. He talks to Design Museum more about what motivates and inspires him:

As I have mentioned, architecture is a great inspiration to me, but aside from the man-made, I am also inspired by natural forms. It is not so much the organic shapes, but the means by which they are generated that interests me. It makes great sense to borrow from elements from biological structures, as these forms demonstrate the pinnacle of material, structural and functional efficiency. (Source)

Like a true designer, Sweeney is giving the humble piece of paper new life and function. You can even attempt his paper folding technique at home by watching this short tutorial here. (Via Exhibition-ism)

Currently Trending

Josephine Cardin’s Haunting Photos Depict An Emotional Lock And Key

cardin-3 cardin-5 cardin-9 cardin-7

New York-based photographer Josephine Cardin’s poignant images examine the beauty of the human body as well as the complexity of the mind and emotions. Cardin’s series, featuring self-portraits, is titled Between Lock and Key . It explores “the dichotomy of how we have both the ability to mentally imprison ourselves, while simultaneously holding the key to unlocking our freedom,” she writes. Muted, vintage-esque compositions showcase her donning a long, black dress in elegant poses (she’s a trained ballet dancer). Cardin is surrounded by expressive, distressed marks and multiple hands that read as both soothing and troubling.

The marks that surround Cardin’s body are visual representations of the mental blocks that we all face from time to time. Thoughts clouded with anxiety prevent us from moving forward with life and seeing things clearly. Cardin draws scribbled clouds around her head and crosses out her eyes using short, energetic strokes.

While there’s a lot of visual strife in Cardin’s series, there’s hope, too. The same lines that hold her down lift her up. It’s as if she’s overcoming adversity and doubt to rise to her true potential. (Via Asylum Art)

Currently Trending

Layer Upon Layer: Eva Jospin Sculpts Cardboard Into Dense, Mysterious Forests

Eva Jospin - cardboard

Eva Jospin - cardboard

Eva Jospin - cardboard

Eva Jospin - cardboard

Sculptor Eva Jospin constantly reinvents the idea of what a forest is over and over again. She cuts, layers, arranges, glues and builds cardboard into different interpretations of The Woods. Her pieces range from smaller 2D pictures compiled from dense sticks, branches and flaky bits of wood, to life size 3D installations that you are invited into, and can move around within. For Jospin, cardboard is just the medium for a larger message; these trees express many things:

The forest – an incarnation of nature in the wild – is above all the setting in traditional storytelling of tests of courage, and can be a gloomy or initiatory place. The forest is also where one encounters oneself. This walk through the forest initiates the visit to ‘ Inside’, which is also an inner journey. (Source)

Jospin uses a material that is not only durable, robust, strong, and supportive, but also fragile, impermanent, raw and insubstantial. She plays on these two points of view – they mirror the actual qualities of trees, nature and our relationship to it. These poetic attachments to Josie’s Forest pieces isn’t lost on her critics either:

To look at a forest is an optical experience that challenges the typical laws of perspective in western representation. Facing visually the depth of a forest means to forget the horizon, it means to get lost. And is not the danger of getting lost the only risk tied up to that natural labyrinth that is a forest? (Source)

Currently Trending

Dramatic Photographs Of Nudes Mimic That Of A Butterfly Erupting From Its Cocoon

E.E. McCollum - Digital C-PrintE.E. McCollum - Digital C-Print

E.E. McCollum - Digital C-Print

Photographer E.E. McCollum’s heavenly figures are both encased and exploding out of their shell in The Cocoon Series. The translucent film covering the figures in the photos transforms the bodies as it mimics that of a butterfly cocoon. McCowell’s work is both stunning and absolutely transcendent, as they seem to be not of this world. Each stretch and fold molds the figures into new shapes as they try to erupt from their form. A master of light and shadow, McCollum started in photography using traditional darkroom processes. This influence can be seen in his current series because they have a stark contrast of lights and darks, much like analogue photography.

The film cast engulfing his figures is lit so well that you we can see every fine line of the body underneath, showing the mesmerizing positions of the bodies. These majestic and elegant poses are not unlike those of dancers, who McCollum often photographs in his other work. Each figure becomes sculptural as the lighting and film engulfing it reshapes and morphs it into another state of being, just like the caterpillar changing into a butterfly. McCollum’s most dramatic and captivating photos are those in which the body is finally erupting out of its “cocoon.” The incredible movement created in these photos is as intense and magical as the transformational act of the creation of butterfly. (via artfucksme)

I love the mystery of these images; the way the material distorts our perception of the body, the layers of the images.          -E.E. McCollum

Currently Trending

Bailey Henderson Sculpts Fantastic Beasts Based Off Illustrations In Medieval Maps

Bailey Henderson - Cold cast bronze, acrylic paint, powdered pigment

Bailey Henderson - Cold cast bronze, acrylic paint, powdered pigment

Bailey Henderson - Cast resin, acrylic paint

Bailey Henderson - Bronze cast

Artist Bailey Henderson creates intricate sculptures depicting fantastic beasts that have been portrayed in medieval maps. Each creature is stylized and made to detail the original image accurately. The texture found in her sculptures mirror the lines in an illustration, like the mythological beings actually jumped right off the pages of a medieval map. These monstrous creatures are often hybrids of two real animals, such as a whale and an eagle, or a dragon and an iguana. Henderson is deeply interested in mythology as well as cartography, which influenced her to make her series Monstorum Marines. Each sculpture is named after its given mythological name, such as Ziphius, the creature that resembles an orca whale, and Porcus Marinus, who is a cross-breed of a boar and a fish. Henderson goes on to describe what the creatures were believed to be and even how they did to kill their victims. Her narrative of the sculpture titled Cockatrice, is both fascinating and entertaining.

A cockatrice is a mythical beast, originating in the 14th century. It the hind quarters of a serpent or dragon, and the front quarters of a chicken. It was believed to deliver a deathly stare, or kill by breathing on its victims.

Henderson’s incredible skill in sculpting is only matched in her painting talent. Cast bronze is the material used to form each claw, tail, and beak in this magnificent series. Acrylic paint and powdered pigments is used to transform the cast metal into majestic beasts full of color and life. Each layer of scales, feathery hair, and powerful wing is created with such attentive detail, that each of Henderson’s unimaginable creatures truly come to life.

Currently Trending