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Pakayla Biehn’s Double Exposure Paintings

Pakayla Biehn is a San Franciso-based artist who collaborates with photographers in her Double Exposure series, by taking inspiration from double exposure photography and painting the images using oil on canvas. The end result is an incredibly beautiful and detailed series with an oneiric quality.

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1000TimesYes

1000_boxCHRISTOPHER R. WEINGARTEN is a Brooklyn-based freelance music journalist whose work regularly appears in the Village Voice, RollingStone.com, Revolver and much more. In 2009 he vowed to review 1,000 new releases over Twitter.At the end of 2009 Weingarten set out to collaborate on a book version of the Twitter reviews with Article.

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Manny G

Manny G - F.A.C.T.

Although we aren’t hiring here at Beautiful/Decay, we wanted to share Manny G‘s portfolio with you all. Navigating through media seamlessly, this recent CalArts graduate pretty much does it all. Whether it’s transforming a found book inside and out, illustrating Chewbacca with only one intense image-making technique, or revealing the cuter (?!) side of sex, Manny G delivers visual feasts. 

 

 

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Ave Pildas’ Nostalgic Photographs Capture The Lively Characters Of Hollywood Boulevard During The 1970s

Teenagers Bus Bench -©1974

Bus Bench – Teenagers ©1974

Halloween - Trannies ©1974

Halloween – Trannies ©1974

People on Stars - Sundance Massage ©1973

People on Stars – Sundance Massage ©1973

Halloween - KKK ©1974

Halloween – KKK ©1974

Bus Bench - Jesus ©1974

Bus Bench – Jesus ©1974

In a series of black-and-white photographs taken between the years of 1973 and 1975, Ave Pildas provides a fascinating glimpse into how, over the span of four decades, the streets and people of Hollywood Boulevard have both changed and remained curiously the same. Pildas moved from Ohio to Los Angeles in 1971, when Capitol Records hired him to design album covers and take pictures of talent. After 6 months, Pildas left to begin his own design company called Plug In and embark on his Hollywood Boulevard project.

“This place is incredible,” Pildas said when we spoke over the phone. “People escaping the winter [and] US tourists lean towards the west — and all the nuts roll towards the west as well, stopping short of the ocean in Hollywood.” Intrigued by these people who came seeking adventure (and perhaps fame in movies and music), Pildas began to collect their portraits. “My style is to interact with people,” he said, explaining his approach. He would wait until an unknown person would walk into the light, engage with them, and then request to take their picture. Some people would pose and smile, and others would hold up their hands in rejection. “For the most part, I was treated well,” Pildas said in good humor.

Among the images you will see a whole cast of characters posing excitedly (or reluctantly) for the camera. There are apathetic teenagers at the bus stop, suave fashionistas, a chef, and, rather controversially, two people dressed up as KKK members for Halloween. In comparison to present-day street photography, which favors strong contrasts, Pildas would minimize shadows by shooting on overcast days. The result is a collection of images that are nostalgic as well as beautifully muted and almost surreal in appearance.

While some of the images look a bit dated (such as the cavalier and inappropriate attitudes of the KKK Halloween-goers), they also show how some things haven’t changed. “The costumes have changed,” Pildas observed, referring to how the fashion has inevitably shifted over the decades — but many things persist. He talked about what could still be seen: the Broadway Building, as well as the variety of restaurants, head shops, trashy lingerie stores, Scientologists, and street people hanging out. What has remained fundamentally the same is the adventurous and eclectic spirit that characterizes Hollywood Boulevard.

In an exhibition titled Hollywood Boulevard: The 70s — which opened at Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions (LACE) on July 1st and runs until September 13th — Pildas has compiled an exciting collection of 51 photographs from the series. The images are made from scans of the original negatives, some of which hadn’t been seen in forty years and required repair. By opening the images to the public, Pildas offers a delightful journey into the lively history of Hollywood Boulevard and its people. Check out his website and Facebook page to learn more.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Fair Weathered Friends

Super fun video by Project Fathom for The Death Set. Illustrations by J. Penry.

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Joshua Abelow

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“My name is Joshua Abelow. It feels great to write my name. I love the way it looks in print. I like the way the “A” at the end of Joshua lines up with the “A” at the beginning of Abelow.  Like This: JOSHUA ABELOW” – Joshua Abelow writes about admiring his own name and his preference to use “Joshua” over “Josh”. Abelow writes often. He makes art, and most importantly lives life often. His works are dark, yet whimsical. Part autobiographical and occasionally asserting historical references, Abelow explores the process of making art and living with the pressures to perform as an artist, a friend and a lover. Works often make fun of themselves  and thrive on the failure of existing as beautiful hallmarks for all of art history’s future. If his essay “I Don’t Want To Name Name’s” is in fact honest, he started to make art for the right reasons, and will continue to do so for a long time. Another recommended read would be “DOINGDEKOONING” where he asserts the relevance of Paul McCarthy’s “Painter“. The importance of viewing both Abelow’s writings and visual works lies in understanding Abelow’s humble, honest  and somewhat naturally naive philosophy on life and the depth that exists within works far more involved than the headlines they announce.

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Japanese Artist Ishibashi Yui’s Unsettling Figures

YuiSculpture japanese Artist

 japanese Artist

 japanese Artist

Japenese artist Ishibashi Yui’s sculptures are both unsettling and serene. Using a variety of materials, such as wood, resin, cloth, clay, steel wire, and stone powder, she often depicts figures whose roots extend and project outward in many directions. These figures appear passive and complacent to these protruding branches, aware of the lack of control they have over this organic process. Some of these protrusions seem painful or unexpected, but ultimately inevitable. Often her figures are off-white, while their protrusions are green or red-hued. These figures are human-like, but their soft, round and white bodies give the viewer a sense they are also of the earth, resembling a plant’s bulb. Yui’s work makes us deeply aware of how we are intertwined with the natural world, and the balance and cycle of nourish and depletion that living and dying requires. (via hound eye)

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Sarah Sze Forages And Deposits A New Installation At Venice Biennale

Sarah Sze - Installation Sarah Sze - Installation Sarah Sze - Installation

Sarah Sze’s installations incorporate everyday items from toothpicks to light bulbs, and “Triple Point,” her most recent endeavor at the Venice Biennale, is no different. Ladders, paper scraps, aluminum rods, sleeping bags, and other finely scavenged items collect and assemble to create a whole new type of machinery: a thinking one that has to do with re-assessing value and investigating the romanticism of objects at play with one another in this never-ending Milky Way of constructs.

According to The New York Times, Sze “wanted the installation to bleed out into the environment.’’ This is relevant to not only the pavilion itself, where the bulk of her work sprawls from room to room and outward onto the exterior landscaping, but also the neighboring community.

Blazing a cryptic trail, before the opening, Sze deposited a series of fake rocks (aluminum structures wrapped in photographs of rocks) sporadically in unexpected places, sometimes, with local businesses, who now house them in unconventional spaces, often along with their own imaginative origin stories. The intention is to lead patrons into the exhibit slowly, almost subconsciously, as though foraging their own trail into the surprising wilderness of Sze’s art.

More images of the installation and a video after the jump.

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