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Kai Sekimachi’s Delicate Bowls Made Of Leaf Skeletons Can Take A Pounding

Kai Sekimachi - leaf bowls Kai Sekimachi - leaf bowls Kai Sekimachi - leaf bowls

Kai Sekimachi - leaf bowls

Although she is more known for her weaving and looming, artist Kai Sekimachi has shown she can branch out into other areas of expression with her impressive bowls made from leaves. Defying the very nature of the materials she works with, Sekimachi has come up with a way to make a flimsy leaf into a structure that can support heavier objects. By adding Kozo paper, watercolor and Krylon coating to the leaves, she is able to turn a skeletal transparent leaf into something that isn’t those things at all.

Having written numerous books on arts and crafts with her husband, Bob Stocksdale, she is an expert on many areas of handmade items and objects. The pair’s practices are both anchored in nature, and show their extensive knowledge as pioneers of American Craft.

Sekimachi creates distinctive pieces from natural materials such as linen, decaying leaves, shells, and grass, and pairs them with nature inspired motifs. (Source)

Sekimachi is not afraid to try her hand at new things, and proves repeatedly that she is a fast learner. After seeing a group of students weaving at the California College of Arts and Crafts in 1949, where she was also enrolled, the very next day, the curious artist spent all of her savings on a loom of her own. She then went and perfected her craft over the next few years.

The influential couple will be having an exhibition at the Bellevue Arts Museum titled In The Realm Of Nature from July 3 to October 18 in Washington. (Via Bored Panda)

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Hsiao-Chi Tsai Combines Fibers And Fashion To Create Eye-Popping, Wearable Art

Hsiao-Chi Tsai - Wearable Textile Art

Hsiao-Chi Tsai - Wearable Textile ArtHsiao-Chi Tsai - Wearable Textile Art

Combining fiber art, sculpture, and fashion, artist Hsiao-Chi Tsai creates beautifully designed wearable art using a variety of different textiles. He uses brightly colored fabric to construct intricate pieces that can be worn on your head and around your neck. The materials used are cut into floral-like shapes that flow organically around the person who is wearing it. A designer by nature, the artist bases these creations off his own illustrations. Because Tsai constructs his designs with such soft material, they appear comfortable despite their non-functional shape and placement. Each piece is creatively designed, utilizing asymmetrical forms and a unique color palette. Although this series, titled Wonderland, is not likely to go with anything in your closet, wearing one of Tsai’s pieces would definitely be a statement!

Creating sculptural, wearable art, this textile designer also forms brilliant installations using the same technique and style as his fashionable art pieces. Using the same textile material, Tsai builds large installations that loops, swirls, and hangs; completely transforming the spaces they are in. These pieces are much like his wearable art, using some of the same elements and cut-out fabric. Each installation is an explosion in its space, with endless gushing patterns. The surge of color in Tsai’s installations can turn any sterile space into a wonderland of cascading fabric flora. Both his wearable textile art series and his installations are uniquely sculptural and are created cleverly with an unlikely material.

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Jim Bachor Patches Potholes With Colorful Mosaics Of Ice Cream

Jim Bachor, Treats in the Streets - Mosaic Jim Bachor, Treats in the Streets - Mosaic Jim Bachor, Treats in the Streets - Mosaic Jim Bachor, Treats in the Streets - Mosaic

Surprising, colorful patches have been appearing on the scarred roadways in Chicago. In an effort to bring art and beauty where once there was neglect and deterioration, artist Jim Bachor embarked on a project to fill potholes with mosaics of ice cream. Named “Treats in the Streets,” each lighthearted piece blends seamlessly into the cracked asphalt. The best part is, as sturdy pieces deriving from an ancient (and enduring) art practice, the mosaics will likely stand up to the test of time. Bachor speaks on his passion for the medium:

Using the same materials, tools and methods of the archaic craftsmen, I create mosaics that speak of modern things in an ancient voice. My work locks into mortar unexpected concepts drawn from the present. By harnessing and exploiting the limitations of this indestructible technique, my work surprises the viewer while challenging long-held notions of what a mosaic should be. Like low-tech pixels, hundreds if not thousands of tiny, hand-cut pieces of Italian glass and marble comprise my work. (Source).

“Treats in the Streets” is also occurring in Finland. In a similar project, Bachor covered potholes with mosaics of flowers. To see me more of his clever and contemporary work, check out Bachor’s website, Facebook, and Instagram.

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Strange Beauty: Jen Mann Celebrates Faults And Flaws In Her Latest Hypnotizing Paintings

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Jen Mann‘s oil paintings are sublime, dreamy, quiet and hypnotizing. They are awkward, special moments of men and women turned into striking portraits. Her luscious brushstrokes and amplified colors are able to turn a mundane moment into something ethereal and magical. Mann also celebrates the flaws and imperfections of her models. Instead of smoothing them over, she embraces them, even exaggerating them – whether it is the freckle under an eye, or the wrinkles in someone’s lips. And that is the thing that elevates the moment into something timeless. Mann says about her paintings and the moment frozen within them:

[They represent] something that is kind of ….lost. [Something] we don’t really look at in our society – we only look at perfect moments, like a manicured facade. (Source)

She explores the idea of identity, how we present ourselves, and who we are. Her paintings represent a ‘lost reality’ rather than the actual reality. They are more about the moment we share together in the world outside of ourselves, and less about the actual person. In a way she is trying to capture the existential image of her subjects – perhaps they are more like a spiritual portrait. She continues:

I’m trying to imagine how I would see an image or a moment as a child. And how hyper saturated and amazingly fun everything was when I was little. The days were longer, the summer was better. Everything was just fantastic… as we grow older, we are less naive. (Source)

Her portraits do feel like recalling a happy memory – like watching an old friend or sibling playing in slow motion in the orange light of a sunset. They are sensational images – emotionally charged, hyper-real and almost surreal. Make sure you continue to get lost in the dreamworld of Jen Mann in the images after the jump.

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Tattoo Artists Ink Over Mastectomy Scars With Empowering And Personal Designs

P.Ink - mastectomy tattoos P.Ink - mastectomy tattoos P.Ink - mastectomy tattoos P.Ink - mastectomy tattoos

Tattoos have been personal and symbolic to a lot of people for a long time, and these tattoos mean a whole lot to these women for a very heart warming reason. P.ink is a collection of artists who team up with breast cancer survivors and ink designs over their mastectomy scars. The aim of the group is to help women who have won the battle with cancer feel happy to look in the mirror again; so that they want to look at their breasts once more, and not only to be reminded of the pain and suffering they have experienced.

For most of these women who choose to get tattooed, the inking process represents gaining control back over what has happened to their bodies. Not only do the images cover the physical scars, but they also lessen the emotional and psychological scars the cancer has created.

Launched in 2013, along with Molly’s story, P.ink has bought together 47 artists and 48 survivors, in over 12 locations around the United States in the few years it has been operational. With over 2.6 million breast cancer survivors in the U.S alone, it was clear a lot of women needed a way to celebrate their battle with the disease. Over 56% of those survivors are left with visible scarring and often no nipples, and adding tattoos to the area after surgery is a beautiful way to turn something that was avoided into something worth celebrating and showing off.

You can donate to P.ink now, or learn more about becoming a survivor participant. (Via Bored Panda)

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Amie Luczkowski Gibson Sculpts Mystical Characters Into Ceramic Planters, Cups, And More

Amie Luczkowski Gibson - Ceramics

Eye Vase

Eye Vase

April & May

April & May

Multi Eye Cup

Multi Eye Cup

Amie Luczkowski Gibson is an Australian artist who creates unique, otherworldly characters in the form of planters, cups, sculptures, and necklaces. Each piece is uniquely molded with its own bizarre facial features and expressions. Recurrent throughout the works are organic shapes and multiplicities, with numerous faces sprouting from the same head or clusters of eyes rippling across ceramic skin. Most of the faces appear contemplative, as if lost in a dream or seeing into another world, emanating a sense of neutrality, wisdom, and intangible mysticism. In a statement provided to Beautiful/Decay, Amie explained the main sources of inspiration for her imagery:

I love how different everyone looks and how there is such beauty in that. Beauty in difference. I get inspired by people’s face shapes, lines, scars — I make my pieces to be as unique as people are. I also get really inspired by the vibe and aura a person gives off more than anything. […] I don’t know how I would describe my work, really. Weird, ugly, and interesting is what most people say about it. Each work is usually based on someone I have seen or met, or just some people’s general energy.

Artists like Amie remind us of the importance of supporting independent artists. As a one-woman show, Amie spends an incredible amount of resources crafting her designs, which — given the time it takes to fire the ceramics — is a  process that can last days. Despite the tendency of our consumerist society to rely on and purchase mass-produced goods, Amie is working hard to produce art lovingly crafted by her own hands and individual vision.

Amie has recently relaunched her online shop, which can be visited here. You can also follow her on Facebook and Instagram.

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Rachel Wrigley Uses Magazine Pages To Create Abstract Sculptures

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It’s not new when artists try different techniques then combine them with more traditional ones. It only becomes more significant if new ground is broken in the process. In Rachel Wrigley’s case this is certainly true. Her paper sculptures created from pages taken from magazines are turned into organic forms which comment on the transience of nature. By utilizing a material which has already been used for another purpose Wrigley recycles an idea in a formal setting which speaks to several different notions. It reimagines the ready made image with hints of origami and paper cutting techniques taking on characteristics which resemble silhouettes of butterflies, snowflakes and flowers.
The recent work Wrigley has produced turns images of domestic spaces such as living rooms and windows into organic forms. It becomes a play off two sensibilities of idea and material which capture moments that reminisce a sliver of morning light streaming through the window blind highlighting only a portion of the room giving it a new and different perspective. These then become unique abstracted forms found and reimagined within the folds of a paper magazine.  (via lustik)

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Unforgettable, Haunting Photographs Of The Nepal Earthquake’s Aftermath

Probal Rashid - Digital PhotographyProbal Rashid - Digital PhotographyProbal Rashid - Digital Photography

On May 12th, the Nepal earthquake striked, killing dozen and injuring thousands. With a magnitude of 7.3, the earthquake was so large that it affected those living in India and Bangladesh. Documentary photographer Probal Rashid, who currently lives in Bangladesh, documented the aftermath through his lens. These photographs tell a heartbreaking story of those directly in the middle of the chaotic and horrific outcome of such an earthquake. Rashid masterfully reveals poignant images of mothers, fathers, and children living in the current state of their homes and villages. The emotions seen in his photographs strike you to your core, as you are shown a child looking right back at you in the midst of this catastrophe.

Allowing us to see a different aspect of the lives of the people affected by the earthquake, Rashid includes images of the remnants of people’s homes and belongings, creating a more intimate connection. A haunting photograph of the inside of a house in ruins displays an empty couch and chairs, with photographs of the family up on the wall. The city’s culture as well as its people was damaged, as we see a piece of beautiful architecture now almost completely destroyed. Rashid rightly has no sensor, as his photojournalism displays an uninhibited truth. Witnessing so much destruction, Rashid also finds compassion.  Although so much desolation can plainly be seen, there is also a sense of hope. The photographer also chose to capture people trying to help; citizen’s aiding one another.

As humans often identify with each other, it is always difficult to see photos with this kind of content. However, it is very necessary for us to see and understand what is happening to others in a place we may not know very much about. Probal Rashid provides us with a better grasp on how the earthquake has affected Nepal and its people in this unforgettable series.

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