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Stina Persson

Stina Persson

 

Stina Persson is an incredibly talented illustrator hailing from Stockholm, Sweden. I’m a huge fan of her rich, full color palette paired with seductive, free-flowing lines. Even the way she handles cut paper is so sophisticated! 

 

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JULIAN WOLKENSTEIN’s Facial Symmetry

They say that facial Symmetry equals beauty. Well Photographer Julian Wolkenstein has put this theory to the test with both her  Symmeytrical Portraits and his Echoism website where you too can see what you would look like with a perfectly symmetrical face.

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Jules Julien

Jules Julien’s portfolio is full of beautifully rendered digital illustrations, playful typography, and a couple mural and poster campaigns for good measure.

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Book 2 is back online!

21567_247284116986_19535656986_3718310_397842_n Good morning, dear readers.  Remember that one nightmare you had when Book 2 was sold out online?  Now you can wake up to a bright new day, because we restocked our online store. So feel free to head on over, and if you feel like it, purchase a copy of Book 2: What A Mess.  Please keep in mind – only 1500 copies were printed… so grab one while it’s still available!  We love you.

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Mutated And Deformed Anatomy: The Sculptures Of Alessandro Boezio

Alessandro Boezio - Clay and Fiberglass

Alessandro Boezio - Clay and Fiberglass

Alessandro Boezio - Clay and Fiberglass

The work of artist Alessandro Boezio is somewhere between a cross of beautiful, anatomic sculptures and a science experiment gone wrong. Created from clay and fiberglass, Boezio’s sculptures take on a strange life form all of their own. The mutated anatomy included in his work display hands with misplaced digits, spidery entities with fingers used for legs, and limbs with mismatched body parts. The artist has an amazing talent in sculpture as his hands and feet, which he mainly focuses on, are incredibly life-like. At first glance, you may not see the odd mutation of the individual hand. However, the uncanny feeling soon forces you to reckon with its disturbing deformation.

The sight of unattached body parts formed into stand-alone creatures can be quite unnerving. As some of Boezio’s hands are missing many vital fingers, many have a plethora of digits that give them a new life. The fingers become spider-like legs that allow the sculptures to become creepy-crawly creatures that can spin a golden web. They become centipedes made up of our own body parts that inch across the floor. The larger the limb, the more peculiar and abnormal each piece becomes. Boezio’s most life-like sculpture includes a fleshy, peach color to resemble skin, and displays legs and feet in place of fingers. The hand’s tone is incredibly similar to life, which makes the mutation all the more bizarre. Unbelievably, you can even see the veins and hair on the hand. Boezio’s detailed artistic skill is just as incredible and shocking as the misplaced anatomy in his work.

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Amanda Burnham’s Fractured Installations Of An American City

Amanda Burnham - InstallationAmanda Burnham - InstallationAmanda Burnham - InstallationAmanda Burnham - Installation

When artist Amanda Burnham first moved to Baltimore, Maryland, she didn’t know anyone. So, she spent a lot of time in her 7th floor apartment that had interesting views of the city. The time spent observing and recording her surroundings later informed her temporary, site-specific installations that are a patchwork representation of Baltimore. Burnham draws and paints street signs, fire hydrants, architecture, and store fronts, piecing them together in a manner that’s fractured yet cohesive. Taking elements of a neighborhood (or neighborhoods), she fashions her own view of the city, creating work large enough for a viewer to walk around and between. In an interview with Dwanye Butcher of Visual Baltimore, Burnham explains why she chooses to work this way (and why she reuses paper and boxes):

The idea of things being layered and pieced together is important to me. I see this city, and really all cities, as these giant ad-hoc organisms – collectively authored, chop-a-bloc, joints exposed – an ongoing melange of edits, adjustments, negotiations. I hope to suggest that with the deliberately collage-y, visually dense, maximalist aesthetic of my drawings.  I also love paper and what it does when treated as an object – the shadows it casts, the way tears and cuts are line. Most of the paper I use is really cheap stuff – low grade drawing paper that comes in rolls, kraft paper, packing materials. Boxes. That’s important because I’m not rich, but also because I see it as conceptually significant – resourcefulness is an ethic I sometimes see evidenced in the forms of the city, and it’s one I really respond to.

Burnham not only takes the outdoors indoors, but creates a whole new environment in a matter of a few days to a week. Lighting, astro turf, and electrical tape craft an ambience that’s unique to the city.

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Jennifer Sanchez

Jennifer Sanchez paintings

Jennifer Sanchez makes some nice paintings. The style might be a bit too reminiscent of Beatriz Milhazes work but still worth taking a look at.

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Liam Henry

LiamHenry3England’s Liam Henry takes wonderful film photographs.  They give a feeling of chilly, sparse, wooded exploration and wandering.

Check out more work at his site and his flickr.

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