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Antonio Ladrillo

I’m loving these clunky illustrations by Barcelona based  graphic artist Antonio Ladrillo.

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Alex Ebstein: Honestly Interesting

Until recently I was unfamiliar with the artist Alex Ebstein, but I am glad to have rectified my lack of awareness.  There is an honesty to Ebstein’s work that I find readily engaging.  The use of yarn or string in an artist’s practice can often shift the aesthetic towards a decidedly crafty end result, but Ebstein manages to use the material with such purpose that it might as well be a drawn line in an architectural blue print.  The effectiveness of the work hinges on her ability to merge direct compositional tactics with a more playful approach to the selected materials.  Ebstein’s use of string also elevates the intentionality of her mark marking, and then quickly reasserts itself as a method of creating illusory depth in what would otherwise be relatively flat pieces.  Taught angular moments combined with purposefully relaxed textures start a visual conversation that I am more than happy to participate in.

I could have just included the ‘eye chart’ pieces because I found them extremely aesthetically pleasing, but the back-story provides a bit of insight that I think most would enjoy.  Think of it as a ‘Director’s Commentary’ for the work.  Courtesy of Miss Ebstein, “…then for the eye chart pieces. They are more of a weird reflection on (and obsession with) eyesight and my existing eye problems that force me to visit the doctor every month. I’ve had four eye surgeries in three years… I am always nervously checking my vision against things, one eye at a time, so these drawings were kind of my own dark humored joke about being an artist and constantly worrying about my vision.”  I am of the belief that ‘going blind’ is one of (if not) the most terrifying things any artist could imagine, and I appreciate the candor with which she addresses what could be an immobilizing reality to those with a more pessimistic outlook on life.  Ebstein will be starting grad school this fall, and I am eager to see how this focused environment will affect her work.  I also encourage anyone interested in contemporary art to check out the consistently interesting programming at Nudashank – a gallery she co-runs with Seth Adelsberger in the Baltimore area.

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William Mortensen’s Photographs Of Witchcraft And Debauchery From The 1920’s Were Ahead Of Their Time

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Photographer William Mortensen (1897-1965) was known throughout his life as someone who took pictures of Hollywood Stars. These were during the 1920s and depicted celluloid figures in a pictorialist romantic style. In his spare time, Mortensen would create images featuring semi-nude women engaged in various acts of witchcraft and debauchery.  Mortensen’s practice of creating elaborately staged scenes and technical effects were ahead of their time. They set certain standards and became popular trends in fine art photography still valid today.

By using different elements in his pictures, Mortensen also turns these unique creations into storyboards filled with narrative. There’s movement and action in these stills which add to their beauty.

Despite the apparent influence, Mortensen would have great debates with Anselm Adams, the great naturalist who would call him a heretic and the anti-Christ. Funny be known now and probably back then too that the anti-Christ would always be much more interesting a subject to ponder in the realm of ideas.

The exhibit, curated by Stephen Romano at the Museum of Morbid Anatomy in Brooklyn, NY focuses on a series called “A Pictorial Compendium of Witchcraft.” The exhibit “Opus Hypnagogia : sacred spaces of the visionary and vernacular.” is a curated collection from The Museum of Everything, London.

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Best Of 2012: Soey Milks’ Ladies

Can’t find much info about Soey Milk but I love these delicately drawn and lush paintings of white haired ladies who look like they are about to cast a spell on you. (via supersonic electronic)

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Disturbing Typeface Imitates The Human Body


For his series Evolution of Type, the artist and graphic designer Andreas Scheiger creates living, breathing fonts; his ABC’s might be dissected like a human limb, revealing boney spines and straining ligaments. With surgical precision, the flesh of his curvy S is pulled back in a manner that is both grotesque and sensuous. In this strange marriage of art, language, and science, the artist is inspired in part by Victorian sentiments and the emergence of Charles Darwin’s On The Origin of Species and the theory of evolution, which spurred medical debate and disillusioned many a spiritualist.

Scheiger’s work is profoundly influenced by seminal Vicorian text The Alphabet and Elements of Lettering, written by Frederic W. Goudy, the designer behind famous typefaces like Copperplate Gothic and Goudy Old Style. Schneiger imagines the literal manifestations of Goudy’s analogies, which compared lettering to animated organisms; like creatures extinct and in existence, language too has a history, bringing with it the ability to record and preserve human thoughts and discoveries.

Within Schneiger’s imaginative font, E’s are skinned to reveal a muscular-skeletal system; deeper still, is a network of red and blue veins and capillaries that transport oxygen to some unknown organ. Much like actual bodies, these letters are capable of deterioration and decay; a G appears lifeless, mounted like dinosaur bones. Similarly, a P gets trapped and preserved in amber, and a prehistoric J is fossilized in stone. The terms “the life of language” or “the body of text” become spell-binding realities in this whimsical and thoughtful series. Take a look. (via KoiKoiKoi)

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Cris Bruch at Elizabeth Leach Gallery


Cris Bruch’s work might be found on a more tasteful version of planet Pandora. His shapes have this mysterious, organic quality that I imagine existing on an alien planet populated by giant blue people who are really into saving the environment and stuff. His exhibition at Elizabeth Leach Gallery, Gather and Wait, from July 1st – August 28th explores the artist’s creative process through a series of drawings, photographs of works in progress, and completed sculptures.

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Allan Peters Combines Vintage Flare With Contemporary Pop In His Dynamic Branding And Logos

Allan Peters

Allan Peters

Allan Peters, a Minneapolis based designer is a man of many hats (to say the least). Ever since he was a kid, Peters has always coped with an overwhelming passion for drawing, hoping to one day make a career out of it. Not surprisingly, Peters is currently working for Target as an Associate Creative Director and has been doing so successfully for the past 6 years. Along with being a Creative Director, Peters also manages his own design firm, Peters Design Co., as well as manages his highly successful blog with more than 100,000 page views each and every month.

Although Peters is excelling in our highly-contemporary, modern world, he has an obsession with good old-fashioned hard work. He reserves a special place deep down for design works that were created by hand for one specific customer, contrasting that with the mass-produced work done today that is highly impersonal and churned out by the hundreds.

This is where Peters found his calling—vintage design. A large majority of his work features antiquated elements of retro nostalgia.  He seamlessly blends hand drawn script fonts with contemporary illustrations that take you back in time without feeling dated. These designs work on everything from window designs and store displays to flyers and branded products giving his clients a unique edge that stands out in todays world of generic logos and mass produced design. Here’s a selection of some of our favorite logos designed by Peters between 2006-2015.

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Li Xiaofeng Assembles Shards Of Ceramics Piece By Piece To Create Elaborate Clothing You Can Wear

Li Xiaofeng - Sculpture 34Li Xiaofeng - Sculpture 30Li Xiaofeng - Sculpture 31Solid armors made out fragile pieces of porcelain. An unusual combination put together by Chinese artist Li Xiaofeng. He collects shards of ceramics in his studio in Beijing and after he drills holes on the surface of the pieces, he assembles them one by one with silver metal wire. All these sculptures can become wearable when a piece of leather is sawn underneath the ceramics which makes the process even more interesting. 

The illustrations on the shards are traditional from the Ming Dynasty. The blue and white drawings are representative of the Imperial tastes and are rare, as they are the more complicated to produce. Within the Chinese heritage, some of the colors have an underlying meaning: the red color represents blood and life, the blue color called ming blue, represents vigor and vitality.
Li Xiaofeng likes to envision his art work as “rearranged landscapes”. Up close, the pieces of shards create an uneven surface and from far it’s a mosaic sculpture with fine lines. “Ceramics are used by the Chinese to eat rice. I break them into fragments to cover the human body, looking for the relation and the dialogue between the body and the shards. Both have to be compatible. Big or small, the shards must suit the form.”

Li Xiaofeng wants to connect tradition and innovation,” In China, ancient ceramics tell long tales. The neck of a vase, for example, is not just for function, but is an expression of status and beauty.” His sculptures don’t just represent a piece of clothing; it’s an irregular assembled silhouette meant to immortalize China’s most precious memories.

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