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Miran Kim’s Boy In The Water

Miran Kim has some interesting narrative paintings with a slight surreal bent.

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Murray John

“Goodbye London” is the new music video from Luke Jackson, directed and animated by London-based animator Murray John. It combines stop motion photography of London with some nice hand-drawn animation added with After Effects. “I set out to capture the bitter sweetness of London life, using urban sketchy drawings on walls,” says Mr. John.

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Last Day To Get Featured In The Next B/D Book!

That’s right folks! Today is the very last day to submit your work to our Future Perfect Book sponsored by the good folks at Prius Projects. We’ve already received hundreds of submissions but we still have room for your work so stop what you’re doing fire up your camera, paint brush, pencils, or computers and help us create a better tomorrow filled with positive creative energy! Get all the details, submission forms, guidelines, and a nice sampling of  submissions on the Future Perfect website!

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Ward Roberts’ Billions

One may find the concepts explored in Ward Roberts’ Billions series confronting, given that the images within this series represent a fast-forming reality, predicted to be the dystopian future not so long ago. But the present is never perceived as the future we envisaged in the past. We move along the arrrow of time as stationary observers, watching the world transform before our very eyes, yet rarely aware of our transition into ‘the future’.

Billions removes us from this stationary reality for a brief moment, lifting us to the surface for air. From this detached place, these images allow us to see our world, yet we feel neither comfortable nor uncomfortable about it. We find the challenges of cognitive mapping, the loss of individualism, that theorists like Fredric Jameson were concerned with. But we seem not to feel alarm. Perhaps we have evolved along with our ideas, with our effects on the world and its dynamic entropy. Our minds have unconsciously integrated what was, through past eyes, a forecast of chaos. In our times, the concept of a billion no longer overwhelms us. As these photographs show us, we can stay solid and identify connectedness between floating transparencies. We now recognize a new kind of whole. It is a work that allows you to recognize your world and your place within it that is truly effective.

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Jenny Odell’s Google Map Landscape Photographs

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Interested in landscapes, San Francisco artist Jenny Odell spends quite a bit of time looking at places viewed from above on Google Maps. Searching for industrial forms and shapes that, when combined create an unusual and striking kind of landscape.  Odell then creates digital prints, the likes of which have even been exhibited in the Google Maps headquarters.  Of her work Odell says:

Much of the strangest architecture associated with humanity is infrastructural. We have vast arrays of rusting cylinders, oil rigs dotting wastelands like lonely insects, and jewel-toned, rhomboid ponds of chemical waste. We have gray and terraced landfills, 5-story tall wastewater digester eggs, and striped areas of the desert that look as though they rendered incorrectly until we realize that the lines are made of thousands of solar panels. Massive cooling towers of power plants slope away from dense, unidentifiable networks on the ground and are obscured in their own ominous fog. If there is something unsettling about these structures, it might be that they are deeply, fully human at the same time that they are unrecognizably technological. These mammoth devices unblinkingly process our waste, accept our trash, distribute our electricity. They are our prostheses. They keep us alive and able, for a minute, to forget the precariousness of our existence here and of our total biological dependence on a series of machines, wires, and tubes, humming loudly in some far off place.”

Drawing attention to our dependent, but odd relationship with this infrastructure Odell is also exploring what it has to reveal about our habits, patterns and the elements of our everyday life.  She is also interested in viewing this infrastructure in a way where it takes on the quality of being the remains from a time and civilization gone by.  In other words, her images take on “tragic air: they look already like dinosaurs, like relics of a failed time from the perspective of a time when we will know better—or when we are no longer here.”

Catch Infrastructure, on view at the Intersection for the Arts, San Francisco until March 29th 2014. In April the exhibition will travel to SPACE Gallery in Portland, Maine and to NY Media Center in New York. In the summer it will appear at the Futur en Seine festival at the Gaite Lyrique in Paris.

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Justin Brown Durand’s Art Giants

Justin Brown Durand is an artist/musician from Northampton MA… and he has some seriously strange output.  Pink deformed giants dancing naked with swollen hands and little faces.  Twisted distorted characters that look a tad bit insane. See more of Justin’s work after the jump listen to his amazingly weird music too at Heart Pump Arts.

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Eco Conscious Street Art Made Out Of Grass And Moss

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Mosstika Urban Greenery is a NYC based collective of eco-minded street artists, using gorilla tactics to evoke the call of man back to nature. They believe that if everyone had a garden of their own to cultivate, we would have a much more balanced relation to our territories. It is with this notion in mind, that Mosstika, aim to collide the worlds of art and nature, creating havens of unexpected greenery, within the colder harsher environment. Together they aim to give green guerrilla tactics a new twist by creating works meant to be touched, in turn aiming to touch the souls of all that pass by. Mosstika strives to call back to mind a more playful existence, returning man to nature, even among the barren patches of urban existence.

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Cory Arcangel

I’m guessing that most readers of this blog are familiar with New York-based artist Cory Arcangel. He is, as far as I can tell, one of the more famous artists currently creating work in that bizarre intersection of technology, low-brow Internet culture, and art. And while I’m a fan of his work in general, I also realize his stuff can be rather hit or miss. So I was happy when I recently revisited his site and discovered his most recent work: Drei Klavierstücke op. 11, which I rather like. The piece is a recreation of Arnold Schoenberg’s composition of the same name, entirely constructed from amateur YouTube clips of cats playing piano.

On Arcangel’s page documenting the project, you can read more about his technical process (it involved audio analyzing software and custom perl scripts), as well as listen to a comparison of an original recording of the piece by Glenn Gould alongside Arcangel’s result. The second two parts of the video are after the jump.

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