Get Social:

Graphic Designer Viktor Hertz Redesigns Annoying Progress Bars Into Clever Pop-Culture References

Viktor Hertz - Graphic Design Viktor Hertz - Graphic Design

The hilariously witty graphic designer Viktor Hertz takes the ever-annoying, monotonous progress bar and turns it into an image full of funny graphics that cleverly reference things like The Walking Dead, Star Wars, and existential questions. Each “progress bar” is turned into similarly shaped objects such as a chocolate bar and a cigarette. Even the buttons are now comical pop-culture references and decisions like “use the force” or “join the dark side.”  Instead of just the decision of clicking “okay” or “cancel,” we now have interesting choices to make. Some of the buttons are not unlike video games, such as The Walking Dead progress bar asking us if we want to use a knife or a headshot to ward off the impending crowd of zombies. Other buttons are possible real life decisions such as whether or not to quit smoking. Nevertheless, the shapes and phrases Hertz offers us in these unusual graphics are much more appealing than the irritating and disruptive real life progress bars.

Being a talented graphic designer who has created many posters and logos, this fun side project takes Hertz’s love of icons and symbols and turns them into silly pictograms. These amusing images remind me of what someone might doodle in school when they are bored, just to entertain themselves and get through the day. If only computers really did use these graphics instead of the normal, mundane “progress bars” and other delays that cause such a nuisance in our everyday lives.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

We Are Made Of Flowers: Marcelo Monreal Fills Celebrity Portraits With Beautiful Floral Arrangements

Marcelo Monreal - Photography, Collage Marcelo Monreal - Photography, Collage Marcelo Monreal - Photography, Collage Marcelo Monreal - Photography, Collage

Marcelo Monreal is a graphic designer and creative director based in Santa Catarina, Brazil. In a project titled Faces [UN] Bonded, Monreal opens up the faces of actors and models and fills them with flowers. Although some of them might be hard to identify from within the ferocious bloom, you’ll see the faces of Julianne Moore, Cara Delevingne, Christopher Walken, and more. By splitting the model’s/actor’s faces along the fine curvatures of their jaws and down the center, the artist accentuates their physical features. The flowers reveal a deeper, more internal vitality.

The idea for Faces [UN] Bonded comes from a very important memory for Marcelo: an insight passed down from his late mother. As he explains in this interview with Dettona, when his mother was dying, they worked in the garden together, and she told him “we are made of flowers” (Source). Marcelo now continues this understanding of human vulnerability and beauty by filling photos with floral arrangements. He seeks to “think, experiment create, recreate, learn, destroy, rebuild” in his work, encouraging all burgeoning artists to explore their potential in a similar, imperfect, and blossoming ways.

Visit Marcelo’s Facebook page and Instagram to view more.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Samuel T. Adams

Stacked, packed, and tacked collages by Samuel T. Adams.

Currently Trending

Melanie Authier’s Contradictory Space

Melanie Authier’s paintings bring together visual contradictions into one imaginary space. By drawing upon the histories of abstraction and the strategies of representation, she presents improbable environments. A sense of disorientation comes about through the way in which colour, texture, line and shape compete for room within the canvas.  Each work presents a brimming jostle of oppositions that the viewer is invited to bring into a certain order.

Currently Trending

Shane Sakkeus

Some really cool work from Shane Sakkeus. I especially like how he exhibits his work online, check out his website!

Currently Trending

Julien Breton Creates Brilliant Calligraphy In The Air Using Colored Light And Expressive Dance

"Fraternité - Brotherhood," Arabic calligraphy. Jodpur - India  (2012).

“Fraternité – Brotherhood,” Arabic calligraphy. Jodpur – India (2012).

"Dead's Place," Abstract calligraphy, New York - USA (2012).

“Dead’s Place,” Abstract calligraphy, New York – USA (2012).

"La beauté - The Beauty," Arabic calligraphy, Tetouan - Marocco (2015).

“La beauté – The Beauty,” Arabic calligraphy, Tetouan – Morocco (2015).

"Compassion," Arabic calligraphy, Issé - France (2014).

“Compassion,” Arabic calligraphy, Issé – France (2014).

In a stunning series of images that blend photography, calligraphy, and performance art, Nantes-based artist Julien Breton (aka Kaalam) uses light and dance to “paint” beautiful and fleeting characters into the air. Inspired by a combination of Latin and Arabic writing styles, each piece is captured on long-exposure film while the artist creates his inscriptions using colored lamps and careful, intention-filled movements. As a living, artistic response to the environment, the designs are matched in compositional harmony to the surrounding backdrop, be it an underpass in New York, an abandoned building in France, or a magnificent hall in India. Each performance lasts several minutes and is then transformed into a single frame, transcending the boundaries of time and our perception of light.

On his biography page, Breton is quoted as explaining his choice of medium, which is rooted in a synchrony of bodily and spiritual practice: “a white sheet is too limiting. To paint on a canvas, however large, means in any case a limit within which I do not feel myself free to express my whole being. Only light is really infinite. The only limit is the air” (Source). Exploring infinitude, Breton’s images demonstrate the seemingly contradictory nature of light; it is bright and endless, yet also fleeting and enveloped by darkness. Both presence and absence are at play in the photographs; the artist disappears while his physical, expressive “trace” (the writing) remains behind. In these pieces, subjectivity and self-expression become greater, geometric portraits of universal energies.

All photographs by David Gallard. (Via designboom)

Currently Trending

Laylah Ali Continues To Comment On Society With Her Stick Figures

laylah ali paintinglaylah ali paintinglaylah ali paintinglaylah ali painting

The stick figures of Laylah Ali are like no other. In her latest show The Acephalous Series which means “headless” she continues on her path of creating a new population of figures with strange expressions and round heads. Her newest resemble vegetables of the cucumber and celery kind. Whereas her former works have studied race relations, torture and hierarchy her newest seem to comment on the state of farming and the food industry. In a number of pieces there seem to be deformities of sorts which could be alerting to chemicals which are rampant in food that isn’t organic. A hybrid baby figure lurking in some might also symbolize sickness affecting unborn and young things. Its sometimes hard to tell with work of this nature what it all means but that’s what makes it both fun and enjoyable. It’s a challenge the artist gives the viewer by making something entirely original.

Ali has been on the international art radar for sometime. She participated in the Venice Bienniale in 2003 and Whitney Biennial in 2004. Her work as a whole is attributed to various types of art stemming from ancient hieroglyphics to comic book serials. She speaks about social issues affecting men, women and minorities using everyday objects such as gym balls, sneakers and sticks.

Currently Trending

Artist Reconnects Illegally Cut Trees To Their Stumps

Philippe Handford installation8 Philippe Handford installation2

Philippe Handford installation7

The site specific installations Reconnected 1 and Reconnected 2 by artist Philippe Handford can be found on England’s Pendle Sculpture Trail.  The pieces are a sort of memorial to the area’s gruesome past.  In 1612 Pendle Hill was the site of a witch trail that ended with the execution of ten people.  Handford began his work with illegally felled tree.  He reconnects the trunk each tree to the stump supported by metal hardware.  The trees, though fallen, don’t seem entirely dead or gone.  They strangely bend to the toward the earth as if resting.

Currently Trending