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Scottish Electro-Pop Trio Chvrches

Chvrches’ Lauren Mayberry performing at the Echo on March 12, 2013 – Photo by Raymond Lew

You could have blinked and missed getting tickets to this hotly anticipated show by Glasgow’s Chvrches at the Echo in Los Angeles last week. Opening the show was France’s Isaac Delusion who played very danceable music to the early arrivals and Denmark’s Karen Marie Ørsted aka stirring up the crowd with her karate styled dancing and ponytail flipping… yup, I’m obsessed with her… check out the video for Pilgrim to see for yourself.

With a pumped up and lively crowd waiting, Chvrches took the stage and played a tight set starting with one of my favorites, Lies. Since this was only their second show ever in the US, their first being the night before at San Francisco’s The Independent, the excitement level was pretty high throughout the show. Other standout songs was their new single Recover as well as the very catchy, The Mother We Share that ended their short, but sweet set.

Definitely a band to keep an eye on, even with the buzz, they delivered a knock out performance. Check out the video for Lies and remember to act fast when they come back to town because I’m sure it will be another quick sell out. You can pre-order their EP, Recover from iTunes out on March 26th.

 

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Kristen Keegan

Mischievious paintings by .

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Korehiko Hino’s Buggin Out

Korehiko Hino’s paintings and drawings of bug-eyed  figures remind me sci-fi movies where aliens come down and put humans under a trance right before they probe them.  They are frozen in time, with no clues of whether they are about to die or if they are in an eternal state of euphoria.

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Book Review: Creative Space & Keegan McHargue


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B/D was lucky enough to receive two new books in the mail today. Here’s me and Fei in the office with completely anonymous bookfaces hanging out with our boss, who happens to be a wizard and was so excited by them he conjured an ephemeral ball of light for the occasion. Anyways, the first is Keegan McHargue’s “Foibles,” from Seems Books, and the second is “Creative Space” by Francesca Gavin from Laurence King Publishing.

 

More descriptions and images after the jump!

 

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Liu Zhi Yin

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Liu Zhi Yin, an emerging artist from China, recently earned her Masters at the Luxun Academy of Fine Arts and has been exhibiting her sculptures in group shows. Liu Zhi uses fiber glass or bronze to construct sculptures of female characters that exude humor, but more than anything else, femininity in every sense of the word. Regardless of either awkward pose or expression, the movement and form of her pieces executes the constant sophisticated finish.

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Interview with Videos Collide artist Jeremy Bailey

Real-time software performance "Future of Theatre"

There is never a dull moment in Jeremy Bailey’s performances – I’d like go ahead the deliveries of his stand-up/software demos/karaoke sessions as the funnier “artistic” Steve Jobs. In “The Future of Theatre” debuting tonight, he plays “this hopeless and foolish slave trying desperately to conjure his machine to do increasingly absurd tasks of questionable use. Computers are the new chauvinist modernists.”

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Brittany Zagoria

Brittany Zagoria‘s deeply personal  and emotional paintings do battle with her inner demons.

“My paintings reflect my subconscious need to demonstrate the existence of evil in others. I grew up with a mentally ill mother, whose physically and verbally abusive actions towards me were relentless, cruel, and, most crucially, without reason. The arbitrary nature of her attacks left me feeling scared, insecure, and especially perceptive of the inherent capacity for monstrosity in all individuals. Through painting portraits of people I have known, I have become aware that my perceptions of others and my relationships with them have been greatly skewed by emotional tumult from my past. A finished portrait is evidence of my raw, childlike way of perceiving each subject. Judgmental and distorted, they are artifacts of my disturbed perception of the world that render tangible my personal, psychological confrontations; the process of painting turns a critical eye toward subject and painter alike. Often grotesque, monstrous and condemning, the final product constitutes my ultimate judgment of human relations.”

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Nathan Vincent’s Six Foot Crocheted Doily Warns ‘Be Good For Goodness Sake’

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Be Good for Goodness Sake broadcast

Santa is not the only one you telling you to be good for goodness sakes. In today’s word, that is, in today’s virtual, and real life panopticon, you have no other choice but to be good for the sake or yourself, your life, your job, etc. Your success as a human being depends on your good (or bad?) pubic, and well documented, behavior. Everyone is watching, everyone is judging.

“Be Good for Goodness Sake”,a three-person show featuring works by Nathan Vincent, Iviva Olenick, and Kathy Halper at the Muriel Guepin Gallery in New York, explores ideas of surveillance and public performance in the age of the virtual panopticon (intagram, facebook, etc).

Taking its name from Vincent’s large-scale work installed in the gallery,  “Be Good for Goodness Sake” pushes audiences to question their stance on surveillance and privacy in the age of social media.

Nathan Vincent’s six-foot crocheted doily acts as Big Brother and it invites the spectators to to sit on a bench flanked by security cameras, while Kathy Halper and Iviva Olenick create embroideries that question the psychosocial impacts of intimate over-sharing via social media. Inspired by her own Facebook feed, Olenick uses embroidery and watercolor to render her own “selfies” and portraits of others. Halper’s work similarly questions the disappearing space between public and private online through embroidered drawings of found images from teens’ Twitter and Facebook accounts.

The exhibition, “Be Good for Goodness Sake” will be on view at the Muriel Guepin Gallery in New York until January 19th, 2014.

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