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Patrick Hruby’s Technicolor Rainbow

I’m really digging these poppy, transparent illustrations by Patrick Hruby!

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Keith Lemley’s Eerie, Neon Ax Installation Explores Memories Of The Forest

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Keith Lemley is an American artist who builds sculptural, light-based installations that explore the crossroads between nature and technology. Featured here is “The Woods,” comprising a dimly-lit room with illuminated axes lain against chopping logs and cracked cement walls. The scene is eerie yet serene, mixing bright-light modernity with the dark, cobwebbed corners of rustic life. The lights bring a sense of warmth and presence where there is otherwise cold stillness, calling upon our own memories of the forest while also estranging them with urban glamor. In the following statement, Lemley describes his desire to transcend time and environmental boundaries:

“My work is about seeing the unseen—the invisible presence which exists in our minds and surrounds all objects, experiences, and memories. Working in my studio in rural Appalachia, I have developed a keen interest in being part of and observing natural systems, time and the process of life and death, and an aesthetic sensibility synthesizing the organic and the machine.” (Source)

Other works by Lemley similarly explore the beauty of the natural world, manifesting it beyond normative representations; “Arboreal” is a speculation on the geometry inherent in nature, whereas “Past Presence” uses light to enhance the ragged dynamism of driftwood. Lemley’s goal is to shift our perspectives on the environment, and he does so by fulfilling the adventurous spirit and infusing physical images with the resonance of personal experience. Lemley’s installations renew familiar landscapes with meaning and excitement; as he writes, “one [ultimately] walks away more self aware and delighted in everyday visual ephemera and the experience of being a living, breathing being” (Source).

Visit Lemley’s website to view more. (Via The Jealous Curator)

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Kay Rosen’s Architectural Wordplay

Chicago based Kay Rosen manipulates text and typography to change, alter, and redefine the meaning of various words and phrases. Her manipulations transform not only the meaning of the texts but also act as typographic illustrations on a grand scale. (via)

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Allen Brewer

Beautiful drawings from the skillful hand of Minneapolis based illustrator Allen Brewer.

Those are some nice glands.

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Maksim Hem


Collage artist Maksim Hem aptly titled this quiet series of works “Untitled Colours.” The name lends itself to the idea of objects overlooked, because they don’t scream and shout to get your attention. Hem’s restraint does not imply a lack of feeling but rather an attention to detail that is unnecessary to decorate. It’s like watching the Discovery Channel over Bravo–the life and times of baby cheetahs are just such a welcome change of pace.

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Laurence Aëgerte Photographs Of People And Objects In Front Of Classic Paintings


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classical paintings

Laurence Aëgerte‘s conceptual photography series, “Hermitage, The Modernists” depicts staged people and objects in front of classic paintings – by  artists like Van Dongen, Kandinsky, Matisse, and Picasso – that were on view at the Hermitage Amsterdam during 2010. Aëgerte’s series complicates the expectation of the experience of iconic works by turning them into photographic palimpsests – the patterns, textures, and colors of the people and objects are juxtaposed against the paintings-as-backdrop that frame the foregrounded subject, elevating the layers of significance of the original painting.

Aëgerte says, “I wanted to investigate our individual relation to art and our perception of iconic artworks. The more the icon is alive in our mind—by means of reproductions and stories around it—the higher is the intensity of the expectation to be confronted with its reality. But what can we really experience of it? When our vision of a work of art is altered, it becomes a reversed mirror—anchored in our present time. By layering the images, I seek the in-between spaces and bits of time that occur in the process of looking.”

“Hermitage, The Modernists” is currently on view at the Hermitage Amsterdam until February 20. (via this isn’t happiness and whitehot magazine)

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Eyal Gever’s Explosions Dissected On Acrylic Panes Reveal The Layers Of Destruction

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Orthographic Slices of Nuke Sim from Eyal Gever on Vimeo.

Artist Eyal Gever mixes two and three dimensions to capture the movement of destruction.  For these installations Gever begins with a three dimensional model of an explosion that is split into ten layers.  The layers are transformed into inkjet prints on acrylic, hung, and lit from underneath.  Combining the ten layers gives the piece a strange sort of depth and seems to freeze time.  Viewing the sculpture, though motionless, you begin the anticipate the motion and unfolding of the explosion as if it were a running algorithm.  Gever explains the technology and concept behind his work saying:

“My sculptures are created from software I have developed. I am influenced by the destructive impact within our environment. Uncontrollable power, unpredictability and cataclysmic extremes are the sources for my work. They inspire, fascinate and remind me of the constant fragility and beauty of human-life. Beauty can come from the strangest of places, in the most horrific events. My art addresses these notions of destruction and beauty, the collisions of opposites, fear and attraction, seduction and betrayal, from the most tender brutalities to the most devastating sensitivities. I oscillate between these opposites.  Using my own proprietary 3D physical simulation technologies, I have developed computational models for physical simulation, computer animation, and geometric modeling. Combining applied mathematics, computer science, and engineering, my work captures and freezes catastrophic situations as cathartic experiences.”

Check out the videos above and after the jump to see how the three dimensional images are sliced.

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Kim Jae Il’s Uses Negative Space to Create An Imaginary Landscape Of Bubbles

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The artist Kim Jae Il is playing a game, using a make-believe print effect to entice the eyes to get lost into the pattern; voluptuous lines of textured round drops running on the canvas. This is the beautiful visual Kim Jae Il is giving us. If watched from far away  the viewer is mesmerized by the scenery, colored water bubbles creating a spiral, loosing itself within the white background.

The bubbles seen are in fact the opposite of a texture. They are the result of an image incised into a surface, the negative space accentuating the hollow shape. This technique is called intaglio. It’s a print technique where the lines to be printed are cut into the base material. Kim Jae Il is using three dimensional sculptural expressions blended with two dimensional pictorial expressions. The cubic and plane layers are meant to push forward the perspective and fabricate an optical illusion.

Kim Jae Il’s intention is to turn the most ordinary into a dynamic mode. Using the motion as a vanished mirage; leaving a vague trace that can only be remembered. The artist wants to “engrave his own vestige”. He gracefully invites us to dig into his art, not just to admire it from far. Because like this vibrating world that we are living in, there’s more that can be decrypted.

Kim Jae Il is represented by Lilac Gallery in NYC.

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