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Miniature Scenes of Industrial Japan Sculpted Using Human Hair

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Japanese artist Takahiro Iwasaki, seen previously meticulously carving topographical maps from electrical tape, has created a new body of work that’s equally as detailed. This time, the artist uses cloth fibers, human hair, and dust to depict miniature scenes of large refineries and power plants. The works were apart of an exhibition at the Kawasaki City Museum earlier this year entitled Out of Disorder.

The charcoal-colored landscapes look like they’ve been under a lot of pressure and are on the edge of collapse. This inspiration came from the industrial rise of Japan, and Iwasaki used satellite images from Google Earth to recreate its old cityscapes. He began forming these sculptures by first soaking towels in ink and then dirtying them to create rags, serving as the base for the delicately-constructed generators and gantry cranes; it’s meant to signify the lands that were leveled in the WWII air raids. These gritty and melancholy scenes depict an era of post-war Japan that is now past, but still recalls the labor and sweat that went into it. (Via JunkCulture, Spoon & Tamago, and Azito Art)

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Ji Yeo Questions Female Beauty With Photo Series Of Women With Eating Disorders And Hollywood Models (NSFW)

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Brooklyn-based photographer Ji Yeo  creates Somewhere on the Path, I See You, a project in which the photographer captures two different types of women: one with extreme self-regulation and distorted notions of beauty that suffer from eating disorders, and the other women are aspiring actresses and models living in Hollywood, California, who are interested in the process of being represented because they carry dreams of fame.

By carefully selecting various body and personality types ,Yeo creates a sample of photos (and people) that further examine larger societal issues regarding ideas of beauty, self-definition, and self-respect.

By forcing viewers to confront images of women who by definition had been judged continuously by themselves, it brought focus to the viewers natural impulse to judge. In doing so it implicates them in the complex relationship we have with making aesthetic judgments.

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Evol’s Electric Box Interventions

I first saw these a few months back and slept on posting them. But after bumping into them again I had to share them with my fellow cult members.  Street artist Evol has redecorated those ugly electric boxes and other utilitarian outdoor structures into mini skyscrapers and apartment complexes. My favorite piece is the planter that is turned into a section 8 housing unit complete with tiny graffiti. See that and more after the jump!

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Kirsten Lepore’s New Stop-Motion Animation Has A Handcrafted Feel That Has Been Long Lost In Animation

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Move Mountain from Kirsten Lepore on Vimeo.

Move Mountain is the latest stop-motion animation by Kirsten Lepore, a Los Angeles based director and animator. We’ve featured films by her before, and Lepore’s newest work does not disappoint. She describes the short film as “A girl journeys through a vibrant, pulsing, macrocosmic landscape, but a precipitous incident compels her to venture up a mountain in an attempt to save herself.” The story itself is a surreal tale, and at one point oscillates between dreams and reality. It also shows us that  at any given time, we are at the mercy of our environment.

The film is Lepore’s Master’s thesis from California Institute of the Arts and took her two and half years to produce. The use of handcrafted characters and fully modeled sets is really impressive. With the current trend being slick-looking techniques, it’s nice to see evidence of the hand in this film. (Watch the behind the scenes video after the jump.)

In addition to Lepore’s own character designs, she’s enlisted the help of animator friends, including the likes of Julia Pott, Lizzy Klein, Ethan Clarke, and more. They make one of my favorite scenes in the film, which is an unexpected but welcome surprise.

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Erika Yamashiro’s Mushroom Capped Fantasy

In Japanese artist Erika Yamashiro paintings and drawings pretty angelic girls live in a fantasy world full of small cuddly critters and  magical mushrooms. These worlds are where  young girls go to escape reality and find the place that they inhabit in their sleep.

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jeremy blincoe’s Fleeting Embrace

Australian photographer Jeremy Blincoe’s Fleeting Embrace series places children in phenomenal settings and situations.

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2D-3D-4D!!!

 

 

Alex McLeod creates representations of reality using 3d imaging software. I’m not sure what his exact process is but the images simultaneously look real and fake… It’s interesting enough work for me to be officially intrigued….

 

 

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J. Frede’s Heirloom’s Of Personal Memories

Los Angeles based artist/sculptor J. Frede‘s recent body of work, “Heirloom” was shown last month at Pirate Contemporary Art in Denver, CO alongside painter Amanda Gordon Dunn‘s latest paintings.  J’s Heirloom collection consists of 13 new sculptures that investigate the objects he uses and  the artists personal memories attached with those objects and the objects he uses where he has no previous history with.  An excerpt from Frede’s artist statement explains it best:

“I am interested in the idea of objects holding the past while hiding their past. The memories we associate with our grandfather’s watch or the blanket our mother made us, we can have strong reactions at the mere sight or smell of items whose history we can recall and these same objects are static to anyone else who sees them with no personal association.”

A reoccurring object J used in several sculptures is rope taking the place of a broken or missing piece in an item in a way that seems to embody or hint at a personified ghost.  J possibly adding narrative to what the object signifies to him from his past, or adding his own imagined explanation to what the objects might of meant to someone who once cared for those treasured heirlooms.

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