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Andrew Knapp’s Photographs Of Hide and Seek With His Dog

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There’s a dog in every one of these photographs. Do you see it? Based on a famous game, Andrew Knapp and his border collie Momo find a variety of places to play hide and seek. Urban areas, grassy parks, graffitied walls and rocky terrain are just some of where you can spot Momo (or at least try). Knapp and his furry friend play this ongoing game called Find Momo with the fans of their blog around the world.

This light-hearted and amusing series is reminiscent of the Where’s Waldo books that many of us enjoyed as kids. Momo is good at hiding, and it’s genuinely difficult to spot him in some of these photographs. Further adding to the feeling of nostalgia, Knapp applies a vintage filter to his images, and they look like they are memories of another time.

If you didn’t know the premise behind them, you can still enjoy these images for the quirky American landscapes that they are. (Via DeMilked)

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Anne Wölk

German artist Anne Wölk uses film stills as her main source of inspiration for these surreal paintings that are in a permanent state of flux.

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Don Brown’s Sculptures And Photographs Of His Muse

For his recent show at Almine Rech Gallery Don Brown  has produced his sculptures at a scale that is significantly larger than usual. Questions of scale are essential in the long process involved in the preparation of these works. The artist initially fashions a detailed clay maquette that will serve as the prototype for a much larger cast. Following enlargement and refining, the sculptures are then produced in either acrylic composite or bronze, but also, although rarely, in silver. The making takes several months, and the pieces are finally covered in a layer of gesso.

For years now Don Brown has been photographing his sculptures against a white background in daylight in order to document his work and bring out elements. By enlarging the prints, he gradually discovered in the flat representation of a volume a certain autonomy that is both powerful and subtle: “It’s as if everything is concentrated in a single view and the surface is uninterrupted” (D.B.).

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Cute Or Crude? Lisa Yuskavage’s Oil Paintings Are Cheeky And A Bit Controversial

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Painting something like Lolita crossed with David Lynch crossed with a crude porn site, the works of Lisa Yuskavage seem to have people divided. Her luscious images of nude women and girls have been described as both vulgar and earnest, affectionate and alienating. She has developed a unique style that blends Renaissance techniques, landscapes, still lifes, cartoon-like figures, porn and religious iconography that both delights and disturbs viewers. Yuskavage’s world is full of innocent yet flirtatious vixens parading around in their undies and getting into mischief in meadows or apartments. Her characters seem a bit narcissistic, and self loving, and in some cases maybe even self loathing. Yet they are definitely interesting and magnetic; a commentary on the complexities of the modern woman and her sexuality.

Drawing on her own childhood experiences, Yuskavage explains her encounters with, and understandings of sexiness and power:

As a little girl, in Catholic school, they were the first feminists I met. It seems counterintuitive, but these women rejected the normal system of life. The ones that taught me were quite smart. When I came to my senses, I realized it would actually be awful for me to live that particular life. I guess I liked the idea of a calling, the intensity of it. (Source)

Works from the last 25 years of Yuskavage’s career is now on show at The Rose Art Museum of Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts. Be sure to visit and make up your own mind if you love or loathe her style and content. Her solo show Lisa Yuskavage: The Brood is on display from September 12 to December 13, 2015 at David Zwirner Gallery in NYC.

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Leah Rosenberg’s Stacks Of Dried Paint

Leah Rosenberg lives and works in San Francisco. Using layer upon layer of dried acrylic paint she creates colorful monuments that blur the line between painting and sculpture. These luscious slabs appear to be wet, ready to curl and swirl at any moment. In her own words these “…bodies of work combine systems of accumulation and elements of layering to explore how our experiences, emotions, and memories build up over time.”

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Last Chance To Subscribe & Get Book 6!

Hey B/D Member! As you may have heard, the Beautiful/Decay book series highlights the most extensive interviews, and in-depth features with upcoming artists today. And in with the latest arrival of Book:6 upon us, this is your last chance to start your subscription and not miss out. With 164 ad-free pages of image heavy articles and collectible art inserts, this hand-numbered book is a source of inspiration you can re-read time and time again. So don’t, wait until it’s too late,subscribe today!

 

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Made With Color Presents: Roni Feldman, Visual Explorer

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Premiere website builder Made With Color and Beautiful/Decay team up each week to bring you some of the best contemporary artists and designers using Made With Color to build their sleek websites. Website builder Made With Color helps artists create well-designed and mobile/tablet responsive websites in a few minutes without having to touch a line of code.This week we are pleased to present the work of Roni Feldman.

Looking at art is a lot like being a treasure hunter or explorer, except the riches lie in hidden meaning and unexpected form.This rings true especially when viewing the work of Los Angeles artist Roni Feldman whose fascinating paintings are a visual game of hide and seek. As you look closer at his paintings faces and bodies appear and disappear creating a wondrous abyss of camouflaged narrative. In his portraits famous explorers of the mind and cultural icons are juxtaposed with various explorations of paint asking the viewer to become a visual explorer themselves.

Feldman’s allover black paintings appear to be black and white but are actually created from glossy, transparent varnish airbrushed onto a matte, black surface. The figures may be invisible from certain perspectives, but are revealed as the viewer moves through the gallery space.  Much like how all colors of paint combine to form black and all colors of light make white, his numerous, luminous figures meld into an abstract field.  Tension forms between individual and crowd, uniqueness and difference, abstraction and representation.

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Georgia Russell Uses Her Scalpel On Images Of Naked Bodies To Bring Them To Life

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A naked body lacerated by regular and organized cuts. The paper sculptures of Georgia Russell are full of expression and poetry. Using just her scalpel to create motion on two dimension pictures.

She collects magazines and newspapers. And browses flea markets to find books to cut. Originally from Scotland, she moved to France after graduating and that’s when she started tearing out books she found on the docks of the Seine in Paris. The artist found in the act of cutting that she was liberating the books from their sculptural forms. Humanizing and creating a connection between the books and the viewers.

Georgia Russell is drawing with her scalpel. The repetitive patterns she designs on the paper look like brisk brushstrokes. Blending with the background, creating texture mimicking feathers blown by an imaginary wind. She gives a voluptuous movement to the cutouts. Circles and waves are embracing the position of the naked bodies.
The artist thinks of cutting paper as a mean to express her feelings. A freedom of speech she uses to captures strong emotions into her pieces. The notion of destruction is omnipresent in her interpretation of the use of the scalpel. However, it’s a positive one. From an abandoned piece of paper and her scalpel, she transforms her turmoil into an organic and vibrant art piece. (via INAG)

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