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Qiu Minye Captures Light And Time Standing Still In These Glowing Photographs

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In his new show “My GodQiu Minye presents us with a new way of seeing. Well, he at least offers us a new way of experiencing objects and the recording of those 3-dimensional things with photography. By painting with light, Minye has suggested different forms of objects that could be real, and then photographed them, resulting in haunting, iridescent, airy images. Whether it is an outline of several figures huddled together watching something in the distance, or an ambiguous geological shape, mythological creatures or floating forms of babies, these snapshots all belong to another space and time.

Minye’s playful images all have a gracefulness to them, and more than most photographs seem to have successfully frozen a moment in time. By removing any fussy details (whether it is light, shadow or color) that may anchor an object in the mundane, he has elevated the idea of the object/subject to something majestic and mystical. The fish for example seems to spitting sparks of fire and is caught in an ethereal state – in a way we don’t see our everyday fish. Minye has managed to capture some sort of life force or see-able movable energy and it is a very calming thing to witness. He has a very existential approach to his art. He poses numerous questions when speaking about his past photographic projects:

What part of humanity is lost in time? How can we transform these moments into eternity? There are always two worlds, the world of yesteryear that has collapsed and the real world. Here, it is to travel between the two. (Source)

Minye seems to be coercing a particular response out of his audience – suggesting we look at the things surrounding us in an abstract, philosophical way – where it’s more about the idea of the thing rather than the tangibility of it. (Via Designboom)

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John Pham’s Streamlined Tron-Like Paintings

John Pham is most well known for his Graphic Novel Anthology Sublife as well as his work on Cartoon Network’s Problem Solverz. His personal work consists of vibrant gouache paintings that simultaneously reference modern design ethics and vintage computer imagery. Pham’s Tron –like environments exist as streamlined versions of Atari 2600 graphics.   

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Richard Amsel

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Richard Amsel (1947-1985) was a commercial artist famous for his movie posters, which include Raiders of the Lost Ark, Chinatown, and more. Having been discovered at 22 (edit: 21) when he made a successful proposal for the poster of Hello, Dolly!, Amsel had a fruitful career applying his hyper-realistic painting style to not only movie posters but album covers, book covers, and TV Guide covers. Amsel passed away in 1985 from AIDS.

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Katie Turner’s Bored Teenagers

 

Katie Turner’s colorful illustrations are a lovingly scribbled cosmos of cute dudes, old action figures, bedroom hangouts, super heroes, and people generally having a good time. 

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Daniel Zvereff’s Stunning Photographs Of The Arctic Come In Unexpected Hues Of Violet,Red And Blue

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Discontinued film stock has become an obsession amongst fine art photographers, and pretty much everyone else (at least the imitation of it even–think instagram filters). New York-based photographer Daniel Zvereff is no exception. In one of his recent series, Introspective,  Zvereff uses some of the last remaining supply of expired Kodak Aerochrome film in 120 format and takes it to the Arctic–a place as endangered as the film itself.

A travel journalist and photographer, Zvereff looks for the picturesque and the mundane- a good mixture of the two brings forth an interesting and stunning collection of photographs from all over the world- including the ones found here, which were taken in very remote parts of the Arctic.

The usage of the expired film showcases brilliantly unusual but beautifully colored mountains, graveyards, and highways in the brief, verdant Arctic summer are stained in otherworldly pinks and purples.

The now discontinued Aerochrome, was originally developed for the military to help them detect camouflage from helicopters: It responds the chlorophyll in plants and reverses green colors into lavenders and magentas and browns into deep blues.

“The Arctic will essentially be the next frontier for mining natural resources, and with a warming climate it’s safe to say it will soon be transformed as we know it, forever, It only seemed appropriate to photograph its incredible natural beauty using a film that is no longer in existence.”

(via FastCompany)

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Eiko Ojala’s Delightfully Minimal Cut Paper Illustrations

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Eiko Ojala

Eiko Ojala (whose cut-paper illustrations were previously featured herecrafts quietly-detailed work which straddles the lines of art, design and commercial illustration. Beginning with hand-made illustrations, Ojala then combines physically cut, layered paper and occasionally digital to continue reducing the images until they are clear, concise and minimally fantastic. Subtlety seems to be the strongest method of delivery for the Tallin, Estonia-based illustrator and graphic designer, who describes himself as one who ” likes to study the forms of shapes, and to work closely with light and shadow. He likes to keep his illustrations minimal and well-advised.”

This most recent blue series was created for Intel as an effort to show the insides of anything, and seems a perfect match for the illustrator’s deceptively simple trademark style. Ojala has been increasingly recognized for his commercial efforts, having been been nominated in 2013 for a Young IIllustrators Award at www.illustrative.de, a YCN professional Award and ADC Young Gun. (via hi-fructose)

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Lauren Clay- Book 5 Featured Artist

These amazing sculptures by Lauren Clay are composed completely out of thousands of pieces of hand cut paper. She uses the most delicate, humble material and through obsessive craftsmanship creates shimmering anti-monuments to art’s glorious past. If you love her work (of course you do!) and want to see more (why wouldn’t you?!) we have a 15 page feature including tons of beautiful images and an interview in Beautiful/Decay Book 5. Pick up a copy, they’re going fast!

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Stunning Photographs Of A Landfill Mansion Made Out Of Trash

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Mark Andrew Boyer, a Graduate student at UC Berkeley’s Journalism school, met Bob Anderson (the man featured on Boyer’s photographs), a former professional boxer, while on a walk through The Albany Bulb, a landfill situated on a fist-shaped peninsula that juts into the San Francisco Bay.

The Albany Bulb, serves the community’s poorest, as many homeless men and women call it, home.

 “I was walking on the shore and heard some hammering in the distance. I followed the sound, and there was this guy building this huge structure.” -Boyer

That guy, as Boyer recalls him, is Bob Anderson, a man who has lived in the landfield since 2011 when he was forced to move out of his Berkley home after his mother’s death-since then he has become homeless. Before that, Anderson had been a professional boxer living and fighting in Las Vegas.

Bob is certainly not your average homeless man.

Anderson’s current place stands strong and tall amongst the highest of trash mounds found at The Albany Bulb. Its astonishing look- one that contains unintended artistic merit- captured the eye of Boyer whom was later compelled to photograph the life of Anderson is his landfill mansion.

The journalist spent a week with Anderson photographing him and his three-story domain, which upon closer inspection was even more amazing than it looked from the outside.

“There could be a shipping pallet next to a mirror next to a piece of plywood next to a mandolin that he’s shoved in between the cracks. It’s a really interesting mix of objects, it’s ever changing. Every time I went back it looked completely different. I went out for a walk once and he had stuck a wind surfing sail on the top of it.”

(via Slate)

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