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The countdown towards Book 3 has begun! In case you missed it, we showed a little iPhone sneak peak last week at the proof from our printers. It has officially been approved, which means our lil book-babes are being born as we speak, and will be arriving in just a few weeks! This one is filled with hundreds of new artists and is a great source of inspiration to anyone creative. Be sure to subscribe today so you don’t miss out…and of course save 33% off cover!

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Designer Fashion Transformed Into Grotesque Consumerism Critique

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The artwork Andrea Hasler if nothing else is a critique of consumerism. Her Burdens of Excess series resemble the strange blend of designer fashion and a slaughterhouse.  Fleshy blobs bulge between straps and buttons nearly turning the high fashion accessories into bizarre creatures.  Zippers and stitching even begin to seem like biological features. Still, our “natural” biological sides as human is a jarring contrast to ideas as contrived as fashion, luxury, even money.

The press release from her recent show at Gusford Gallery in Los Angeles states:

“Hasler’s work focuses on constructions of identity and collective desires, and is characterized by a tension between attraction and repulsion. The works in the Desire series, in particular, focus on the obsession of projections of affluence and glamor. Reworking designer bags, shoes, and accessories into organ-resemblant sculptures, Hasler’s works engage with the psychological aspects of consumerism, blurring the lines between what you are and what you must have.

Through the transformation of GUSFORD’s Melrose Avenue gallery space into an indulgent, glamorous shop, Hasler’s installation embodies the epitome of luxurious excess, and looks to a dystopic future, where branded organs may one day be the ultimate fashion accessory.”

Watch a video of her installation at Gusford Gallery as well as a short interview with the artist after the jump.

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Motiongraff Visits Nicholas Gazin

The good folks at Motiongraff visit Kooky NYC illustrator Nicholas Gazin for a stop motion photographic tour of his illustration process. You can also find Nicholas’ work in our current book, Beautiful/Decay: Future Perfect. Watch the full video after the jump!

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Sea Wreckage or Art? Mary O’Malley’s ‘Porcelain Crustaceans’

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Mary O’Malley’s Bottom Feeders is a series of oceanic ceramics that look as if they were discovered among sea wreckage. These “porcelain crustaceans” appear delicate and dangerous, as the aquatic life that crawls among the porcelain seems as if could consume and become the dish itself. Inspired by her home by the sea, O’Malley created this series with porcelain, red Iron oxide, 22 karat gold luster, and a cone 6 glaze that shes makes herself using a recipe called Alfred White. She enjoys creating work that juxtaposes seemingly disparate imagery or ideas, such as the series of urns she created that she intended to be humorous. Of this series, she says,

“What interested me with this series, is by applying the creatures to plates and bowls I was reminded of naturally occurring circumstances where nature takes over man made scenarios. Humans are constantly vying for power against the natural world but we can never quite seem to win. Once I started to create these pieces I then started to notice the same pattern going on in the world around me: moss growing on a concrete wall, barnacles growing on the side of a dock, tufts of grass poking up through cracks in the sidewalk, etc. Maybe I am interested in this series because it is a truer representation of the world we exist in.” (via)

Be sure to check out O’Malley’s Etsy shop, where you can purchase some of her work. She currently lives in New York.

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Endia Beal’s Portraits Of White Women With Black Hairstyles

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Photographer Endia Beal has created corporate-style portraits of white women with hairstyles often worn by black women for her series, “Can I Touch It?”. Beal was first inspired to do this project after interning in the IT department at Yale while she was there earning her M.F.A. At the time, Beal, who is tall and black, was sporting a large red afro. She stood out among her mostly shorter, white male colleagues, and one even mentioned to her that a rumor was circulating around the office that the men were curious about her hair and wanted to touch it. She eventually asked some of her male colleagues to touch her hair, and even pull it. A week later, she recorded their reactions. She wanted the men to experience something new, and they were admittedly uncomfortable.

She next sought out middle-aged women who work in the corporate world for “Can I Touch It?”. “I wanted people that had a certain idea of what you’re supposed to look like in the workspace, because it would be a challenge for them to understand what I experienced in that space…And to a degree, many young white women have shared that experience, but for older white women it’s an experience they haven’t necessarily had.”

“I said, ‘I am going to give you a black hairstyle,’ and they were like, ‘You’re going to give me cornrows?’ ” Beal recalls. “And I said, ‘No, we’re going to do finger waves.’ ‘Finger waves? What’s that? You mean from the ’20s?’ And I said, ‘These are a little bit different type of finger waves!’ ”

She says the women were excited to learn something new and to show off their hairstyles. Through this project, Beal hopes to start a conversation among people who come from various gender, race, and generational backgrounds, especially within the rigidity of a corporate environment. She is currently in North Carolina continuing this project, and is considering having the women enter and work at their offices with these new styles, after which she would record their experiences. (via slate)

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Rejected Blood Donations From Gay Men Turned Into Intriguing Exhibit Of Medical Discrimination

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Blood Mirror is a collection of various works of art composed of blood donations from gay, bisexual, and transgender men which have been rejected by the FDA. The mixed media exhibit is made up of a short film by Leo Herrera which traces the story of nine gay men who have chosen to “donate their blood for art” given the FDA ban on donations from MSM( men who have sex with men). Their donations have been placed in a large cube through which light reflects on a panel painted with blood. The exhibit will include a sculpture, “Untitled”, composed of the blood collection tubes and blood bags of the nine men from Herrera’s short film. A “Blood Flag” will also be a part of the exhibit.

Aside from the vastly controversial aspects of using human blood as an artform, Blood Mirror has a strong political stance and strives to generate a dialogue surrounding the FDA’s regulations on blood donations. The use of blood in such an aesthetic manner provides not only strong visuals but also underlines a situation present within the medical world. The merging of the science and art worlds displays the necessity and beauty of elements such as blood give us the chance to think about the importance of speaking about things such as the right to donate.

Blood Mirror will be on display at the American University Museum from September 12th to October 18th.

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Giving Thanks for the entire cult of decay

 

We’re taking the day off to spend some much needed time with our friends and family and to give thanks for all great things that have taken place over the last year. We’re also thankful for all of you who support us each and everyday by subscribing to our book series, reading our blog, and taking part in our creative community. It’s going to be a great holiday season and we have lots of great projects ready to go to get you all inspired. So get off the computer (just for today), spend some time with the fam, and eat delicious food until you’re about to burst. Happy Thanksgiving ya’ll!

 

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Josh Dorman

Whisper (all images via Mary Ryan Gallery)

Whisper (all images via Mary Ryan Gallery)

Josh Dorman paints on old topographical survey maps, tinted with age and layered with meticulously arranged shapes and images, colors flowing within and outside of existing contours, combining histories and facets of the past to embrace a dream that is reflective and inquisitive of the real world. His current show at Mary Ryan gallery was a refreshing reminder of my great enthusiasm for all things collage, especially if it invokes looking at and thinking about the world with fantasy inducing stories while incorporating an undercurrent of criticism, passive yet incisive questioning, and a loss of order or norm.

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