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Scott Chasserot Uses Art And Science To Find People’s Ideal Image Of Themselves

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Original Ideal from Scott Chasserot on Vimeo.

In his project Original/Ideal, British photographer Scott Chasserot tries to answer the question “What would we change about ourselves if no one were looking?” Using photography, image manipulation software, and an Emotiv EEG brain scanner, Chasserot’s project attempts to discover each individual’s ideal self-image without having the subject utter a word. It’s an interesting combination of art, science, and perception.

The first step of the process is to remove or reduce accessories and enhancements from the subject being photographed. Makeup is removed, hair is pulled back, clothes are adjusted so as not to appear in the frame—the goal is neutrality. The photograph is taken, then manipulated into 50 versions, each with tweaks to facial features, head shape, coloring, and more. The subjects are then hooked up to the Emotive scanner which records brain activity while they are shown the altered images. The scans are examined for signs of “engagement”—particular mental focus which Chasserot interprets to be a positive reaction. The image that produces the most positive brain reaction is thought to be the subject’s ideal version of his- or herself.

“What do we find instinctively beautiful in the human face, and how does this translate to self-image?”

It’s interesting that Chasserot equates an unvoiced preference to instinct. After all, even though the person’s reaction to his or her images is ungoverned, societal influences, cultural ideals, and pre-existing ideas about attractiveness are all learned, not instinctive.

“The methodology is still in pilot study phase,” Chasserot told The Creators Project. “There is plenty to be improved upon. The ‘Ideal’ image is simply the one with the greatest positive reaction immediately after presentation and that cannot be distinguished from any theoretical, specific ‘ideal self’ reaction.”

In the photos below, the original image is on the left and the chosen “ideal” version on the right.

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Beth Livensperger Gets Reflective

Beth Livensperger’s painterly canvases are full of confusingly convincing visual miscues.  Fluorescent lighting, mirrors, and expanses of reflective glass complicate vision by blinding, doubling, and flipping what we see.  Livensperger uses these illusions in ways which prompt the question “what exactly am I looking at?”  She makes us pay attention to places we would normally ignore, like store fronts, wood shops and laundry rooms.  In the process bringing us into a one on one confrontation with our sense of sight.

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Artist Interview: Chris Hood’s Process And Paint

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This week we chatted with NYC-based painter Chris Hood to find out a little bit more about his most recent work—abstracted mixed media and traditional oil-on-canvas pieces—that pull from a variety of contact points in visual culture. Hood’s curious arrangement of imagery feels as though it’s connected to some larger narrative, and it’s interesting to see what inspires his process. Full interview after the jump.

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Jonathan Robert LeBlanc

Landscape photography is a fickle mistress.  Jonathan Robert LeBlanc’s photographs weave an elaborate tapestry of cramped urban decay and endless country skies- facing history with little or no irony.

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Russell Powell Paints Detailed Portraits On His Hands And Then Stamps Them On Paper

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First grade school teacher Russell Powell takes a favorite children’s past time and has turned it into something awesome. Using ordinary acrylic paints, he builds up realistic portraits of celebrities, musicians or cultural icons on his palms, then while the paint is still wet, he stamps them onto paper. He calls the process ‘hand stamping’ and has no doubt developed his skill over the 14 years he has been teaching kids to explore their own creativity.

Powell is able to utilize the lines, textures and indents of his hands to add to the detail of the faces he paints. He has stamped the faces of many – from TuPac, to The Girl With The Pearl Earring; from Kurt Cobain, David Bowie and Gwen Stefani, to the Dalai Lama. Powell has also been working on some original artworks – or rather faces that he creates as he paints. His pieces usually have a empathy about them; it is easy to see the San Jose based artist is a lover of people, characters and their humanity.

He can see more of his people studies on his website Pangaean Studios. (Via Bored Panda)

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Magic Eye: Ari Fararooy’s Surreal Self Portraits Made With Mirrors Will Play Tricks On Your Eyes

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Just like you shouldn’t trust everything you read on the internet, you shouldn’t believe everything you see. L.A based special effects artist Ari Fararooy‘s latest photographic series is a perfect example of this. Using a tripod, mirrors, a self timer and ‘a few digital manipulations’ he has created a very surreal, and futuristic set of self portraits. He went to Joshua Tree National Park wanting to carry on his creative twists on the latest ‘selfies’ craze.

The goal was to experiment with reflections and explore the various ways I could creatively photograph myself. (Source)

He also had this aim in mind while attending the Burning Man festival in 2014. After he found himself in the strange environment that is the desert, surrounded by many creative people, he began clicking his shutter and coming up with some very inventive camera tricks, involving glow sticks, long exposures, strange perspectives and wide angles. You can see that series here.

His photographs are just as surreal as a Dali painting, but he uses modern technologies and a different set of skills. Be sure to see the extent of his talents to transform the ordinary into the extraordinary on his Facebook and Instagram pages. (Via Fubiz)

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Daphne Wright’s Morbid Animal Sculptures

Daphne Wright is known for her unsettling yet poignant sculptural installations which use a variety of techniques and materials including photography, plaster, tinfoil, sound, voice and video. She has also worked on larger scale public art projects, collaborating with artists across disciplines; architects, writers and theater professionals to create works which deal with the indescribable.

Stallion (pictured above) is a full size cast of a dead horse. Lying upturned in the gallery space the power and strength of the horse seems to have collapsed with the fall of the animal on the gallery floor. At first sight the composition brings to mind a horse rolling in grass yet, on closer inspection we see the skin of the body has been peeled back revealing sinuous tendons and raw flesh. The familiarity of the animal and its playful association slides into an anatomical study colored by identifiable emotions.

Equally complex in its layering of suggested meaning is another animal cast – the delicate body of a rhesus monkey. Cast at a Primate Research Center Wright’s monkey is sensitively displayed lying on its side. The cast holds the body, permanently capturing the flesh in solid form. Covered in a fine layer of embroidered ‘hair’ its face, hands and chest recall the living animal yet the needlework gives a strangeness to the small figure. The face of the animal has been colored by a painter of religious statues, giving the monkey a touch of the other worldly.

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Liza Lacroix’s Tormented Abstract Portraits

 

Interesting paintings done in oil on lexan from Brooklyn-based artist Liza Lacroix. Portraits rendered in lush, swimming applications of color, the works maintain a haunting distance and obscurity. Our faces are the most expressive elements of our bodies by far, and somehow Lacroix’s denial of direct access to such expression makes you want to stare at these tormented paintings even more; to try and uncover the meaning that’s hidden in plain sight.

The artist opens Works, a solo exhibition, this Thursday, 7-10 PM at Candamill Gallery, 89 Mercer St. NYC.

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