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Michael Massaia’s New Jersey

Michael Massaia is strictly a large format photographer making classic Platinum/Palladium prints.  This process creates beautiful results especially for his series “In the Final Throes- New Jersey.”

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Photographs Of Sudan’s Indigenous Dinka Group

This seminal volume on the indigenous African Dinka group is a landmark documentation of a vanishing people in war-torn Sudan. World-renowned photographers Angela Fisher and Carol Beckwith have devoted their lives to documenting the rapidly disappearing ceremonies and cultures of the indigenous people of Africa. In breathtakingly poignant images, they present a story that started with their first visit to the Dinka thirty years ago. Living in harmony with their cattle, the Dinka have survived years of war only to find their culture on the brink of vanishing forever. Where the White Nile River reaches Dinka country, it spills over 11,000 square miles of flood plain to form the Sudd, the largest swamp in the world. In the dry season, it provides abundant pasture for cattle, and this is where the Dinka set up their camps. The men dust their bodies and faces with gray ash—protection against flies and lethal malarial mosquitoes, but also considered a mark of beauty. Covered with this ash and up to 7’ 6″ tall, the Dinka were referred to as “gentle” or “ghostly” giants by the early explorers. The Dinka call themselves “jieng” and “mony-jang,” which means “men of men.”

Angela Fisher and Carol Beckwith have spent a lifetime studying the peoples of the Horn of Africa, and have published their photography in a series of acclaimed books as well as major magazine features in Time, Life, Vogue, Marie Claire, and Elle. They exhibit and lecture widely at prestigious venues such as the American Museum of Natural History, The Smithsonian Institution, and the Royal Geographical Society in London.

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Andrew Lewicki’s Extreme Transition

Andrew Lewicki sculpture

LA sculptor Andrew Lewicki built this bad ass half pipe for a skateboarding themed group show at the Torrance Art Museum. Check out a few more skating themed works as well as a oreo cookie manhole and gold color crayon gold bar sculptures after the jump.

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Christoph Ruckhäberle’s Vintage Geometric Figures

Good buddy and painter extraordinaire Alison Blickle turned me onto the work of Christoph Ruckhäberle the other day and my mind was immediately blown.These paintings are completely bizarre and incredibly beautiful. Everything from the choice of color, the abstraction of the human body, and the strange vintage imagery sets it aside from work that you see on most gallery walls!

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Studio Visit: Trudy Benson and Russell Tyler

Trudy Benson and Russell Tyler are a married, power-painting couple. I first found out about Trudy maybe 3 years ago. My friend friend showed me her work via the internet and I was very impressed.  A couple months after that I went to New York and got to check out her show at Freight + Volume and was blown away.  Recently I got in touch with Trudy to see if I could come visit her studio- I took the opportunity to check out her work and as well as Russell’s.

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Alex Takacs


Alex Takacs is an LA based artist. His work is a fresh spin on current illustration. His use of minimal color and line detail work reminds me of retro magazine illustration but he puts his own little twist to them, making the viewers wonder the narrative story behind each piece. Not only is Takacs an illustrator but also is part of a collaborative group  known as the Young Replicants. Young Replicant is a teenage directors label and design collective featuring Takacs as well as  Joe Nankin, Adam Kauper, and Jackson Seidenberg. Recently, they won a fan video contest that was for  M83 single “We Own the Sky“!

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Ulric Collette Splices Together Family Members To Compare Physical Similarities

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Son / Father: Nathan, 7 & Ulric, 29

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Cousins: Justine, 29 & Ulric, 29

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Brothers: Christophe, 30 & Ulric, 29

The series Genetic Portraits almost works as a casual study.  Quebec based photographer Ulric Collette seamlessly blends the faces of two relatives to create one portrait that is hard to look away from.  The resulting photographs highlight the differences an emphasize the similarities between siblings, children, parents, and cousins.  It is nearly as if the images are a visualization of the genetic traits traveling between generations.  Genetic Portraits is also an absorbing record of time’s effect on physical appearance.  Eye  s, for example, appear to be near exact copies between father and son, separated only by the wear of thirty years.

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Stunning Photographs Made Entirely Of Disease-Causing Bacteria


During his graduate studies in microbiology, artist Zachary Copfer invented a new type of photography, one grown entirely of living bacteria. By exposing sections of microscopic organisms to radiation, he accelerates their growth, allowing them to multiply and compose vivid photographic portraits. Copfer’s subjects include both artists and scientists who inspire him; famous images Albert Einstein and Pablo Picasso are replicated in Serratia marcescens, a human pathogen often associated with infections of the urinary tract and respiratory systems. The portrait of Stephen Fry is made of bacteria found in the actor’s own body.

Copfer’s portraits closely resemble the art of Roy Lichtenstein; his faces bear the same comic book-style polka dots made famous by the legendary pop artist. Also like Lichtenstein’s paintings and prints, they are duplicates of mass-produced, iconic public domain images. But quite unlike the work of Lichenstein and his colleagues, Copfer’s images are imbued with an undeniably unique and human tenor. These bacterial cells, some drawn from the bodies of the subjects they portray, are corporeal and therefore inevitably personal. In contrast the ink used by the pop artists, these cells will someday die. Though iconic, these portraits are ultimately of mortal men, and the fact that they are rendered here in disease-causing bacteria only underscores that fact.

In addition to portraiture, Copfer experiments with photographs of celestial bodies. Here, in glowing green E. coli genetically modified with GFP, the vast cosmos are paradoxically formed from the microscopic, reminding us that in the end, all matter great and small is profoundly interconnected. Take a look. (via Jezebel)

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