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Blair Whiteford’s Fragmented Paintings

Blair Whiteford lives and works in New York. His fragmented paintings blur the line between figuration and abstract expressionism like the Bay Area Figurative Movement in the 1950’s. In his own words, “I am interested in the way that a body interacts with its surroundings. The images that I create depict bodies and spaces that are constantly being altered by a hypothetical understanding of the space that the figures are experiencing. While creating my recent body of work I have been particularly interested in the space that exists in between non-objective abstraction and representation, allowing the two to transform into one another throughout the paintings.”

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Robert Tirado

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Robert Tirado describes his artworks as “consequence to the experience of traditional art techniques, which sometimes gives it a perfect balance between the particular look of digital work and the expression of real life painting”  This up-and-coming artist explores an array of different mediums for his illustrations. AEI.UO is his new experimental project that puts together digital illustration, painting and graphic design, which  intends to “break through with patterns in so-called digital art.”  Tirado also has an upcoming solo show in Valencia, Spain at La Booktique Del Diseño on June 18th! So if you so just so happen to be in Spain on June 18th check it out! His work is definitely  something I would want to check out in person.

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John Kleckner

John Kleckner’s tortured wizards all look like they have imbibed a forest full of bad acid trips.

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Robert Schlaug’s Glitchy Landscapes

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German photographer Robert Schlaug creates Limited Area, a series in which we get to know landscapes, not as the usual sublime, endless terrains, but simply as a place that is contained and eventually terminated. In essence, Limited Areas reflects the “limits of human experiences via everyday landscape photographs.”

“Sometimes we feel we’ve run into a wall or stand in front of a precipice, not knowing how to proceed further. Or suddenly there opens up before us an insurmountable wall, and we know no way out. Even our thoughts and our imagination constantly finds their limits.”

By digitally manipulating the images, Schlaug re-creates something that we are used to seeing in our computer screens- a corrupted file, a glitchy image. Precisely, he drags down streaks of color across each section of his photographs; the result, a visual experience that he hopes will “raise awareness in times of total sensory overload.” His images, turn into colorful abstractions that will perhaps remind the viewer of the grand Abstract Expressionist works from the 1950’s. (via Phaidon)

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Video Watch: Vintage Graff Public Service Announcement From 1976 (We’ve Come A Long Way)

Check out this interesting PSA from 1976 that explores graffiti during a time when the art form had just blown up in public consciousness. This video really allows you to appreciate the status which graffiti has achieved today, even if we’re not all the way there yet. Though it presents many views on its subject, the piece comes off as biased. Make sure to look out for gems like “kids who write on toilet walls have psychological problems – let’s help them straighten out their heads.” Watch the 13-minute video after the jump.

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Tex-Server

Tex-ServerBased out of England, Marc Kremers is a designer/net-artist who manages to incorporate the same sense of schizophrenic randomness apparent in his works to all facets of his internet persona. The website itself is a long scrolling photo-dump of projects (flash clips, audio files, etc) and more or less half-formed thoughts. Personally, I think his website is really clever, it transforms the monotonous text and image portfolio into something more resembling a museum and Marc, posited as the curator.

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Jonny Sutton’s Photos Allude To Themes Of Pornography And Memory

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English photographer Jonny Sutton creates subtle but powerfully symbolic photography that alludes to various themes including the quotidian, sexual experiences, and memory.

Athough Sutton is interested in depicting scenes that are familiar to past personal recollections, the haziness and [sometimes] cinematic feel of his compositions make the viewer feel disjointed and distant to what they may otherwise feel very familiar with. Sutton’s recent series, Remains and Pornography, explore the memory of sexual experience through objects and familiar scenes that may trigger flashbacks to ones own past regarding sexual involvements.

Remains focuses on sex and the relationship it has with our surroundings. His photographs record the aftermath of a night of passion. By photographing what is left behind, the artist creates an interesting narrative that again brings the viewers to remember with hazy and distant thoughts.

His other series, Pornography, explores the themes of sexual documentation, pornographic films and violence, and the sexualization of children. In this case, Sutton uses a Barbie Doll and manipulates it in a way that presents the viewer with subtle, but obvious sexual positions. The artist’s prop here works as both the subject of his composition but also as a very important part of his concept and main messege. The dolls’ body, identifiable with the female form and a child’s innocence, is easily taken and manipulated to reenact sexual positions. This might be a reference to rape or a man’s power over a woman/child, however, its meaning is unclear and not explained by the artist himself. Nonetheless, it is certainly a logical conclusion to come to. Moreover, Sutton’s way of blurring the images leaves the spectator to witness a sequence of events that are blocked off and partially remembered [on behalf of whom is theoretically experiencing that manipulation,etc]. On the other hand, from an outsiders’ perspective, we acknowledge that the intrusiveness of the camera, or our gaze, in this case, is what makes the work the ultimate source of manipulation.

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Sam Burford’s Sculptures Made From Star Wars and Blade Runner Time-Lapse Photographs

Sam Burford lives and works in London. Inspired by such films as Star Wars and Blade Runner he creates photographic work in multiple media that encapsulate entire films within them. Take for example his sculpture made out of jesmonite that consists of a time-lapse photograph of Star Wars IV transformed into a surface relief. The film is condensed into an abstract pattern and presented as a three dimensional sculpture. In another piece a time-lapse photographic detail from Blade Runner is highlighted on hand printed film and allowed to curl for a dimensional effect. With his work he serves to reveal the optical patterns inherent in the moving image that can be captured with modern technology.

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