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Marine Coutroutsios Constructs Brilliantly Colorful Abstract Paper Birds Inspired By the Native Australian Species Around Her

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Inspired by the beautiful wildlife around her, artist Marine Coutroutsios cuts and constructs intricate, abstract birds out of colorful paper. Relocating from Paris to Sydney Australia, where she currently lives and works, Coutroutsios’s work is heavily influences by her environment. This series of hers titled Australian Birds contains patterns and colors that are found in the Australia native species she sees in her everyday life. With names like Yellow Tailed Black Cockatoo and Pale Headed Rosella, it is no doubt that the artist has named them after the individual bird species that each piece aims to resemble. It is interesting that although these pieces do not resemble the shape of a bird, nor do they possess a beak or even a head, we can still see that they are unmistakably birds. Resembling a target shape, it is almost as if the bird has been flattened into a nearly symmetrical circle.

Throughout childhood, Coutroutsios was always creating something, whether it is through embroidery or origami, which accounts for her incredible skill in paper cutting. Always feeling a connecting with nature, she also creates her own environments with her paper installations full of brilliant colors and shapes. She does not only pull inspiration from nature in the sky, but also nature in the water. Make sure to check out her Ocean Series where she takes her circular shaped method of sculpture and applies it to swirls of cut paper, creating whirlpools of color. (via BOOOOM)

“Through my travels I’ve realized how much I feel connected with my environment. It keeps me grounded and humble regarding our place in this world. With my work I’d like to inspire and engage you to reconsider the value of your surroundings. I think beauty is everywhere and it’s a powerful source of energy.”

– Marine Coutroutsios

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Katerina Kamprani’s Uncomfortably-Designed Objects Make Your Life Worse, Not Better

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Good design is supposed to make life easier. Ideally, it’s beautiful, intuitive, and useful. This can be said for things like Apple products, for instance, but the same doesn’t apply to Katerina Kamprani’s The Uncomfortable project. The architect has applied the exact opposite principles to objects such as forks, watering cans, and rain boots.  Instead of helping improve our lives, they make it harder but being oddly contorted, ill-placed, and out of the wrong materials. This includes hairy dishes, a cement umbrella, and steps that lead to nowhere (paired with a door you can’t enter).

Kamprani (also known as KK) ponders if these designs are vindictive, or perhaps a helpful study of everyday objects. Her goal was to make them uncomfortable (hence the name) but technically usable and to maintain the essence of the original item. While they aren’t totally unusable, they certainly won’t improve your life. (Via La Monda)

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John Squire on Cy Twombly

I’m really into these TATE Britain Artist “Shots” lately. All under 5 minutes or less, they’re succinct little vignettes that are informative, yet still short and sweet. Here’s a bite of John Squire, an amazing musician and artist (from my hometown in England of Manchester) who was in the Stone Roses talking about Cy Twombly.

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Diederick Kraaijeveld’s Reclaimed Images

Exquisite relief sculptures by Diederick Kraaijeveld using discarded and reclaimed wood.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Maison Hermès

What a great window display concept by Japanese designer Tokujin Yoshioka for the Maison Hermès windows.

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Titus Kaphar Reconfigures Paintings With Cutouts And Texture

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Titus Kaphar creates new perspectives on art with his deconstructed installations. After painting in the style of classical and Renaissance greats, he begins to change the works, literally peeling them back in some cases. He uses cutouts and silhouettes to recontextualize the paintings in a way seems to lift the curtain and show us another layer of reality. “Open areas become active absences, walls enter into the portraits, stretcher bars are exposed, and structures that are typically invisible underneath, behind, or inside the canvas are laid bare, revealing the interiors of the work,” Kaphar says of his work.

Cipher also experiments with texture, adding thick layers of paint and creating a new dimension of emotion and expressiveness as a result. Some of his pieces are contemplative, but others are playful, like a portrait of a man with the subject peeled from his surroundings and left crumpled before the foot of the frame. Kaphar explains:

“I cut, crumple, shroud, shred, stitch, tar, twist, bind, erase, break, tear, and turn the paintings and sculptures I create, reconfiguring them into works that nod to hidden narratives and begin to reveal unspoken truths about the nature of history. … In so doing, my aim is to perform what I critique, to reveal something of what has been lost, and to investigate the power of a rewritten history.”

(via I Need a Guide)

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Misha Hollenbach’s Crude Sculptures

Misha Hollenbach lives and works in Melbourne, Australia. Using found and created objects he presents the viewer with absurd and alarming “artifacts” in which the eloquent clashes with the primordial. Swiss publishing company Nieves describes his work as “…merging contemporary culture with tribalism. Working across the mediums of collage, screen-printing, painting, sculpture and installation, his work is often driven by carnal desire, and a return to the basics/basis of human existence.” While speaking of his motivations Hollenbach frames his body of work perfectly stating that “Things can always be a bit more insane.”

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Peace Not War: Artist Replaces Soldiers Guns With Flowers

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Multi-media installation artist, video maker, designer and all-round talented guy Mister Blick has made some beautiful collages. Placing colorful flowers on old war time photos, in the place of where guns normally would be, he makes a sweet and subtle statement. Alluding to many different political actions in war time, his message is clear. Why do we continue to use force against one another?

The subject of his collages will resonate around the world, but perhaps more so in Portugal. On April 25, 1974, there was a military coup in Lisbon which is now known as the Carnation Revolution. When the population took to the streets to celebrate the end of the dictatorship, carnations were placed into the barrels of the soldiers’ guns, and placed on their uniforms. It is a classic example of how radical political and societal change can take place without the use of bullets.

Mister Blick’s images are a simple reminder of how quiet, gentle actions are usually the ones that end up heard the loudest. And it is a timely celebration of one of the most original revolutions in Europe, and in the world. Happy Freedom Day everybody! (Via Honestly WTF)

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