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Rubbish Fairy: Berlin Junk Artist Turns Discarded Trash Into Kitschy Costumes And Masks

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Junk artist Rubbish Fairy (Sophie Soni) is constantly hoarding, collecting, cutting, gluing and arranging, yeap you guessed it, rubbish. She manages to take discarded plastic bits and pieces and turns them into wearable, kitschy, technicolor rainbow explosions. Soni fashions together chunky head pieces, masks, breastplates, dresses for different performers, musicians, artists, and fashion shoots. Basically anything that can adorn the body, she has it covered. Her pieces include stunningly ornate chandelier head dresses, or Victorian-style flouncy dresses littered with cheap and cheerful gems, or balaclava masks covered with red silicon lips, pig noses and multiple strings of beads. She has even chopped up soft toys in the past and used their various limbs and heads as different bits of jewelry.

Ms Fairy piles everything on all at once and manages to bask in the chaos she creates. As a comment on consumer culture, vanity, the fashion industry, and the economy of desire, her work is reminiscent of installation artist Mike Kelley. Both manage to exist simultaneously within and outside of pop culture. They heavily reference, and use the resources from the world around them, yet manage to place themselves in an order separate from it.

Rubbish Fairy’s world is a surreal, captivating, all encompassing one – where, if you’ve been in it for long enough, you will start to see the trash around you quite differently. See more of her out-of-this-world creations after the jump.

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Laurent Gongora Changes The Flow of A Waterfall With Hi Geometric Installation

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Laurent Gongora creates interventions in nature, and this is his biggest stunt yet. The artist made 24 metal plates and attached them to the façade of a waterfall, the Cascade de Vaucoux in France, to redirect its flow. The name of the project is Les Cascadeurs, which means stuntman in French, and also references cascades, which can mean waterfall. It looks like a much more majestic plinko (that game in The Price is Right where you drop a chip and try to land it in the $10,000 slot). In a video you can see on Gongora’s website, the power of the waterfall is accentuated by the installations as they waver back and forth under the bombardment of water. Gongora’s aesthetic gives the piece even greater impact, as its simplicity allows you to wonder about the logistics of mounting such a piece.

Another artwork that acts similarly to Les Cascadeurs is Le Diamant Noir, where Gongora places a black diamond in the middle of a forest in Pays de Condé, France. The land is a heritage site which used to be a coal mining bassin, and so the diamond represents the interaction between the natural landscape and the mining enterprise. The black diamond was installed over a tree, but the material is a metal with holes all over. Slowly the tree grows out from under the diamond and will theoretically overtake the structure. It is a balance between nature and human intervention, and Gongora demonstrates that each may have an effect on the other. (Via My Modern Met)

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Tibi Tibi Neuspiel

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Here’s some Saturday morning breakfast for you. Toronto artist Tibi Tibi Neuspiel makes “Assassination Sandwiches” of tragic political figures’ visages (as well as other alive and passed famed figures like Karl Max and Stephen Hawking) with incredible accuracy. Yum. The last image in this post of a carefully rendered scene from a Growing Pains episode, Youtube player and all, is pretty funny.

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Grant Hamilton

Grant Hamilton

Grant Hamilton has this amazing polaroid series aptly titled “Geometries.” I’m totally loving his clean, simple, and clever compositions.

 

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Alma Haser’s Origami Portraits

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Photographer Alma Haser has often incorporated origami into her work.  However, in her series Cosmic Surgery the origami is brought to the forefront.  For the Cosmic Surgery Haser photographs a series of portraits.  She next makes multiple prints of the portraits and folds them into complex origami objects.  The origami pieces are placed back into the portrait and a photograph is taken of the final composition.  Haser mixes the meditative nature of origami and transposes it onto the face of her subject, somehow injecting simple portraits with an esoteric atmosphere.

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The Morbid Crystal Covered Sculptures of Nicola Bolla

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The work of Nicola Bolla is arresting in its contrasts.  The artist often fashions sculptures of straightforward (albeit morbid) objects that are then covered in sparkling crystals.  The glamorous glitter of the crystal is juxtaposed against the utilitarian nature of many of the objects they cover.  These are further contrasted in these images taken by photographer Sergio Alfredini.  The dilapidated house provides a strangely ideal setting to emphasize these brightly dark sculptures.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Meta

Jurriën Boogert’s Graduation thesis video Meta is a suspenseful masterpiece! It’s not everyday that a 2:16 minute video will put you on the edge of your seat. Watch the video after the jump.

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Cameron Stott

I love these simple and poignant drawings by Cameron Stott. I just wish there were more of them!

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