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So Many Wizards – “Inner City” directed by Greg Ruben

Artist, Designer, Filmmaker, and all-around dude-that-makes-stuff, Greg Ruben, just released a new music video project for So Many Wizards‘ “Inner City.” The video follows an average joe dressed in business-usual as he embarks on the ultimate lunch break in and around a lot of unique spots in Los Angeles. The film’s aesthetic approach is really hypnotizing. You’ll have to see for yourself after the jump…

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Benjamin Oliver – In Search of Our Senses

Benjamin Oliver, a recent graduate of the Royal College of Art’s Design Interactions program explores the space between our everyday experiences, inventing prototypes that can give participants a way to experience all new senses. I love the approach Benjamin took in framing his experiments – By creating photographs with such rich narrative, the artist leaves behind a series of bizzarre rooms in which these sensory objects supposedly underwent a round of testing.

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Bone Furniture

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Dutch design agency/think tank Joris’ Laarman’s exquisite Bone Furniture.

“Ever since industrialization took over mainstream design we have wanted to make objects inspired by nature: from art nouveau and jugendstil to streamline and the organic design of the sixties. But our digital age makes it possible to not just use nature as a stylistic reference, but to actually use the underlaying principles to generate shapes like an evolutionary process…

Trees have the ability to add material where strength it is needed, and bones have the ability to take away material where it is not needed. With this knowledge the International Development Centre Adam Opel GmbH, a part of General Motors Engineering Europe created a dynamic digital tool to copy these ways of constructing used for optimizing car parts. In a way it quite precisely copies the way evolution constructs. We didn’t use it to create the next worlds most perfect chair, but as a high tech sculpting tool to create elegant shapes with a sort of legitimacy. After a first try-out and calculation of a paper Bone Chair, the aluminium Bonechair was the first made in a series of 7. The process can be applied to any scale until architectural sizes in any material strength. The Bone furniture project started in 2004 with a the research of Claus Mattheck and Lothar Hartzheim, published on Dutch science site Noorderlicht.” (via)

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Population Control

It’s almost 2011 and one year closer to THE END OF THE WORLD so it seems like perfect timing to post a video about Boomboxes coming alive and taking over the world.
Video by Gregthedude for Exile.

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Ian Larson

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Ian Larson’s works are incredibly congested with raw, dirty, crude energy. I almost feel too shy to really observe his paintings. The way Ian paints so thickly onto his canvas, almost has these exposed, and humping characters pop out of their environments in an attempt to keep you from looking away. Definitely attention grabbing.

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Javier Aguilera’s Brutal Reality

Madrid based artist Javier Aguilera’s sculptures are brutally realistic.  Check out some more of his work after the jump!

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Alfredo Barsuglia Built A Secret Pool Somewhere In The Mojave Desert, Take A Dip If You Can Find It

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Tucked away in the middle of California’s Mojave Desert is a tiny pool whose location is unknown to the public, identifiable only by guarded GPS coordinates. It was imagined by Austrian artist Alfredo Barsuglia, and is technically open to the public. If you want to swim in it, all you need to do is ask the MAK Center for Art and Architecture in West Hollywood about the longitude and latitude points and obtain the special key to open the pool’s cover.

The four-foot by 12-foot body of water is available for 24 hours to any one person or small party, and you must bring a gallon of water per person to replenish the pool. Its minimalist stylings are painted white and stands out against the sandy and arid terrain. Alone in the desert, it’s an oasis for a weary traveler or nomad. Barsuglia calls it Social Pool, and meant for the swimmer to consider the societal ramifications of this outdoor installation. A description of the project reads:

The work embodies the massive socio-economic changes that have taken place in the last forty years. It thus understands itself as the product of an economy in which privacy and immateriality have been fully commodified… For many a consumer, art is expected to operate according to the principles of the service economy rather than following humanist ideals of intellectual or moral stimulus and education.

Whether or not this pool encourages this deep thought or is simply a well-thought gimmick remains to be seen. (Via Huffington Post)

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Sven Sachsalber Literally Looks For A Needle In A Haystack As Part Of 24 Hour Performance

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While, to most, the phrase “looking for a needle in a haystack” is merely a humdrum idiom, to performance artist Sven Sachsalber, it’s a challenge. That is why Sachsalber opted to devote 24 hours to handpicking his way through a pile of hay set in the Palais de Tokyo. The entire performance was documented as a video on a live feed, and–spoiler alert!–18 hours passed before the artist finally found the elusive bodkin.

While, as in the case of Looking for a Needle in the Haystack, Sachsalber tends to gravitate toward performance art, he also shows an inclination toward sculpture, film, and photography–a fact that is worth noting when considering this recent project.  By placing an enormous haystack within the context of an art museum and filming himself interacting with it, the artist inadvertently transforms the mound into a piece that transcends traditional artistic description.

Galerie Rianne Groen describes his ourvre as “often funny, often serious and sometimes both,” and emphasizes that “his works have a universal poetic element that does not need much explanation.” And, with this literal, almost tongue-in-cheek interpretation of such a tried and true figure of speech, this statement undoubtedly holds true. (Via Hypebeast)

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