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The Surveyor Tape Installations of Megan Geckler

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The slick site specific installations of Megan Geckler beam and bounce of walls like lasers.    Her installations’ ultra clean geometric forms and bright colors nearly hide the personal quality to the work.  The plastic rays are actually made of flagging tape – the kind you find just off the sidewalk typically used by surveyors.  Her installations intentionally bounce between art and design, industrial and hand made, cold and personal.  Also, just as her work shifts conceptually, it also shifts in shape from angle to angle.  Strands at one angle interact with strands at other angles as a viewer moves through the space. [via]

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Sergei Bobkov’s Wood Chip Sculptures

53 year old Russian sculptor Sergei Bobkov makes magic out of basic wood shavings creating all of our favorite animals out the material that most sculptors toss out with the trash. His process begins by creating hundreds of Cedar wood chips, each 2-3 inches long.Each wood chip is then hand carved into the appropriate shape per sculpture. This grueling process can take 10-12 hours a day for up to 6 months to complete just one piece.  (via readactor)

 

 

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Daan Botlek’s Street Art Of Figures Crawling Out of Their Skin

Dutch artist Daan Botlek creates commissioned murals and work for the street.  His art makes use of simply conveyed bodies often contrasting the inside with the outside.  Many of Botlek’s pieces illustrate a sort of literal introspection, looking inside each character.  The characters peel off, crawl out of, and smash off outer layers to expose the inner person.  Botlek works both in the gallery and on the street, his figures populating walls through out the city inside and out. [via]

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Peter Stewart Captures Dizzyingly Vertical Portraits Of Hong Kong’s Skyscrapers

Peter Stewart - Photography

Peter Stewart - Photography

Peter Stewart - Photography

Peter Stewart - Photography

Photographer Peter Stewart captures the pulsating neon guts of Hong Kong from a unique perspective. Standing at the bottom of dizzying skyscrapers and towering apartment buildings, Stewart offers us a glimpse of modern architecture as a force of nature. Each floor of the buildings he photographs looks like the ring of a tree, surreal in their orderliness.

In an interview with The Creators Project, Stewart explains how he chooses his subjects. “All it takes really is a keen eye for finding the beauty in the monotonous,” he says. “The everyday structures that we often fail to appreciate.”

The collection is called “Stacked – Hong Kong,” a fitting name. From some angles, the buildings almost look like life-sized Lego blocks. Oddly, the photographs do not impart a sense of claustrophobia, but rather a peaceful calm. The bright colors and little personal flourishes — a balcony-dwelling plant here, a line of fresh laundry there — are tell-tale signs of human life. It’s almost a little too calm — where are all the city’s inhabitants?

Still, rather than looking post-apocalyptic, Stewart’s portrait of Hong Kong is dreamy rather than dismal. It’s as though the city is asleep or simply waiting, holding its breath.

(via Design Boom)

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Before And After Photo Series Captures The Disappearing Face Of New York City Storefronts

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C.B.G.B., Bowery

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Jade Mountain Restaurant, East Village

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Delightful Coffee Shop, Harlem, NYC

Optimo Cigars, Union Square

Optimo Cigars, Union Square

Photographers James and Karla Murray spent ten years documenting New York City’s ever-evolving storefronts, and recently published their decade-long project into the popular book, Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York. Of the project, the photographers say, “STORE FRONT provides an irreplaceable window to the rich cultural experience of New York City as seen through its neighborhood shops.”

The strength of the series is found in it’s wide-lens, capturing a time when opening a small business in New York was actually a viable option, and comparing that to the gentrified and corporatized Manhattan of today. This can be seen in vivid and stark contrast in photos like the Delightful Coffee Shop in Harlem being replaced by a ubiquitous Dunkin’ Donuts (above). Many of storefronts shows lost clients due to the ever-increasing rent, business which remain empty today, which has a depressing, darkening effect on the people who still remain in the community. James Murray says of the idea behind the series, “until you place them side-by-side and really look at the two photos, you cannot get the true sense of loss experienced by the neighborhood.”

More images from the series can be seen at their Facebook page. (via mashable)

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Ben Hopper Transfigures People Into Abstract Sculptures

Ben Hopper - Photography Ben Hopper - Photography Ben Hopper - Photography Ben Hopper - Photography

Photographer Ben Hopper‘s “Transfiguration” project transforms his subjects into living sculptures. Each photo is charged with kinetic energy, only heightened by the bold streaks of body paint and splatters of white powder.

“Like a mask, the layers of body paint and powder disguise the identity and release something animalistic from within,” Hopper says. “It also creates a sculptor / painting looking figure, more abstract and less human.”

For his subjects, he chose to work with dancers and circus artists whose athleticism and grace enabled them to contort themselves into the surreal shapes needed. Some of the photographs look like cubist paintings because of the contrast between black, white, and human flesh along with the seemingly impossible angles and feats of flexibility performed by the subjects. The body paint looks almost like strokes of charcoal, creating depth while also the illusion of two-dimensionality.

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Tyler Spangler’s Spooky Neon Portrait Remixes

Tyler Spangler - Digital Collage Tyler Spangler - Digital Collage Tyler Spangler - Digital Collage Tyler Spangler - Digital Collage

Tyler Spangler’s digital collages rehash old portraits to uncanny effect. He mixes faces like batter or melts them like wax. Of course this would be much more gruesome were it not for the joyful neon colours he employs. His artwork has the distinct aesthetic of the internet age. Wild patterns and powerful colours are overload for the eye, providing a high level of stimulation pretty much required, now, to incite a strong reaction in the viewer.

In some cases, the overabundance of pattern and colour has the viewer process less, or otherwise require us to take much more time to do it. When there is so much to take in, the options are either to skim over it, or take much more time to engage with it. Spangler has a great range of intensity. Some of his works have 5 or less elements, where other have 20 or more different textures.

Spangler works digitally, and creates all of his graphics himself. Whereas in aesthetic the works can be called collage, he uses a minimum of recycled imagery. In this way, Spangler is more like a painter than a collage artist, creating his own imagined imagery. He is a digital painter easily able manipulate familiar imagery. (Via Hi Fructose)

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Buket

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Yesterday Los Angeles tagger Buket, aka 26-year old SJSU grad Cyrus Yazdani, was sentenced to nearly four years in prison after pleading guilty to one count of felony vandalism while on probation for 32 prior vandalism charges. Buket is apparently known for daredevil stunts, some of which have popped up in brazen, bravado-filled YouTube clips. One of these clips, which depicts Buket climbing onto a Hollywood Freeway overpass and tagging it in the middle of the day, is embedded in this post after the jump. While this particular stunt is clearly very dangerous to not only Buket but the drivers who were distracted by him, do the severity of his crimes justify the four year sentence?

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