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Micaela Lattanzio’s Photo Mosaics Shatter Portraits Into Bits And Pieces

photo mosaic

mosaic photo mosaic Micaela Lattanzio - Mixed Media

Micaela Lattanzio creates works of art that go beyond the traditional forms of photography. This collection, called “Frammentazioni,” shatters photos into bits and pieces, enabling Lattanzio to play with space and texture. Her mosaic-esque pieces contain a sort of kinetic energy, suggesting form and movement in a subtle way.

Like other types of art that use human features, it’s hard not to assign emotion to Lattanzio’s work. She literally uses human images as jig saw pieces, evoking a sort of psychological depth that could be read as anxious or even playful.

Some of Lattanzio’s works are use the various pieces of photographs as pixels, rearranging them around each other but maintaining some semblance of the original shape. Other pieces lace together long stripes, looking like the result of two inkjet printers communing  (via Hi-Fructose)

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Legendary Sci-FI Master, H.R. Giger Dies At 74





Legendary Swiss surrealist H.R. Giger, has died this past Monday, May 12th,2014 after sustaining injuries from a fall. He was 74. Born on February 5, 1940 in the rural town of Chur, Switzerland, the artist showed an interest in dark art forms from an early age but trained to be an industrial designer at the School of Applied Arts in Zurich.

Geiger was best known for designing the iconic “xenomorph” creature in the Alien movie franchise, and for his work in Alejandro Jodorowsky’s ambitious film, “Dune”.

Giger’s nightmarish imagery-a blend of mechanical and biological androids-was in fact fueled by his own bad dreams and by an early interest in artists like Salvador Dali and Ernst Fuchs. The artist kept a journal by his bed so he could record the imagery. Wired reported that Giger had “an idyllic childhood in one of the most beautiful places on Earth. But it harbored forbidding structures and estranged elements that left an impression on a child subjected to night terrors and panic attacks.”

An early series of controversial art, most likely influenced by his perturbed childhood nightmares and anxieties, landed Giger a gig to create the album cover of the 1973 Emerson, Lake & Palmer album, “Brain Salad Surgery.” After his success with the English progressive rock trio, Giger became highly solicited in the movie business.

After winning an Academy Award for visual effects on “Alien,” the artist continued to experiment in show business by designing sets for “Poltergeist II” (1986) and “Alien III” (1992).

Giger, however, found himself disliking Hollywood. Later after the last Alien movie, he retreated back to Zurich in hopes that he could get back to being a visual artist for his own sake.

In 1998, the artist founded the H.R. Giger Museum in Gruyeres, Switzerland. Since then, Giger was inducted into the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame and worked on several other projects- including a guitar line with Ibanez. (via NPR and Daily News)

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Donna Stevens Reveals The Zombie-Like, Vacant Stares Of Children Watching Television

Donna Stevens - PhotographyDonna Stevens - PhotographyDonna Stevens - Photography

What would a television see if it could look back at us? Artist Donna Stevens reveals images of children hypnotically looking into a television screen in her series titled Idiot Box. Each photographs captures the entranced look on a child’s face as they gaze on with a zombie-like stare, complete with the glow of the screen lighting up their face. Although this series is somewhat comical, as the children have their mouths hanging open or a silly grimace slapped on, there is a heavy darkness to it. Stevens’s aims to question the role of technology in our society and explore the effects it may have as children are exposed to it at such a young age at such a high volume. Although we can benefit from technology, what is lacking in our lives because of it? Although Idiot Box includes fairly simple images, the affect the vacant eyes have on the viewer is enough to make you stop and think.

Stevens’ incredibly memorable photography explores themes of identity and hardship, as she is interested in people’s journey to find their place in the world. Humanity’s struggles can be found as a theme in her work, both in Idiot Box and in her series Thirteen. In the latter series, she poignantly captures the anxiety and uncertainty that comes along with becoming a woman.  Stevens’ ability to encompass such strong emotions and themes in a single portrait is apparent in each photograph. Originally hailing from Australia, the photographer is currently based in Brooklyn, where she continues to create her sharp, thought provoking work.

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How Real Men Would Look If They Posed Like Models in Famous Underwear Ads



real men

Women have had the opportunity to rise against the perfection of the ad model. For instance, Jes from The Militant Baker goes against the grain by reinventing the black and white, over-perfected couple shots seen in Abercrombie and Fitch’s stores by posing, as a plus size model, with the regular Abercrombie male model. Many ad campaigns [Dove, Hanes, etc] have also done the same thing countless of times by producing content that celebrates the fact that beauty comes in every shape and size. These ads, however, almost never feature men, but only women.

So what happens with men? Do they not go through the same? Are they not as affected by the distorted ideals of beauty as much as women are?

In this photo series, Jenny Francis and The Daily tabloid newspaper, The Sun [England] teamed up to show how real men compare to the popular underwear ads that showcase the chiseled abs and faked tanned male models.

Four average looking men, stood alongside David Beckham, Cristiano Ronaldo, Freddie Ljungberg, and David Gandy to show off what a real life man would look like wearing the same exact underwear and standing in the same exact poses. The photos are quite funny, but they are also quite empowering as the provocative poses and the polarity of bodies shown in the comparisons further examine the different male body types out there, from short and thin, to tall and bulky. Just like women, many men are confronted with the issue of body ideals that are often impossible to achieve. (Via My Modern Met)

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Vintage Paparazzi Photographs From The 1970s Make Me Love Los Angeles

Brad Elderman - Photography

Brad Elderman - Photography Brad Elderman - Photography

There’s nothing better than starting your morning with a nice cup of coffee and a little photograph of Robert Plant in a Speedo, playing soccer, casually, in Encino. I mean, am I right? At least, this is how I feel about Brad Elterman’s vintage paparazzi photography.

Taken when he was a teenager in the 1970s, long before roaming candids overwhelmingly lined our checkout shelves and powered ad revenue for various websites, Elterman brings a wild naivety to these specific shots that are, strangely, almost endearing. This softness might be relative to time + distance, but I don’t know. I also like to think that it’s more so reflective of the person behind the camera: a teenage youth excited to relate and investigate not just icons, but also the heart of his beloved city: Los Angeles.

For instance, the most striking aspect of Elterman’s Joan Jett portraits is not her fame nor her coolness, but instead, it’s an understanding that the photographer has with Jett’s charming desire to dwell at the Tropicana and slum amongst LA’s Rock N’ Roll finest. There’s something very optimistic and lovely about identity and everyday social performance that is examined. Scroll down after the jump to see what I mean, and while you’re there, check out a perfect shot of super casual Rod Stewart mingling after a random soccer match in Coldwater Canyon, dragging a pint of beer and chatting up some pretty dog walker. In each image, we are not wowed by hot nightclubs nor couture culture. No. We’re impressed by Los Angeles and it’s rich variety of eccentric yet absolutely charismatic artists figuring out how to be seen and be in the world as they are, at the same time.

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Maija Luutonen, photography hide-and-seek


Please let's pretend, color photographs, 2006-2008

"Please let's pretend", color photographs, 2006-2008

I think I have a thing for photographs like Maija Luutonen’s lately and maybe that’s a reflection of my own need for indulgent escapism? I don’t know.


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When I sleep at night this is what my dreams look like. OKAY….. maybe they don’t look like this but I wish they did.

By Emilia Forstreuter

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Made With Color Presents: Lost In The Paintings Of Edith Beaucage, With A Ballerina And Her Entourage At A Rave

Edith Beaucage - painting 9Edith Beaucage - painting 5Edith Beaucage - painting 4Edith Beaucage - painting 3

Beautiful/Decay is pleased to introduce online website building platform Made With Color, which empowers artists artists to build a professional website in minutes. Made With Color allows artists to build a sleek website and share their art without having to code and spend hours on lay-outs. The simplified and responsive navigation is made to be functional. Giving both the artists and the viewers the possibility to explore some of the best contemporary art in a pleasant environment. This week, we are sharing Edith Beaucage’s latest work ‘Chill Bivouac Rhymes’ series.

California based Edith Beaucage translates an atmosphere onto the canvas, using the painting as a snapshot. Her work involves characters, a scenario and a scene. Allowing the imagination of the viewers to go beyond the painting and envision their own story. The ‘Chill Bivouac Rhymes’ series is built as a loose leaf narrative. A ballerina, her entourage, her Russian lover, a rave and a specific, yet invented location: Yellow Boa Canyon.

The paintings depict the characters interacting with each other in the fantasy land created by the artist. Edit Beaucage’s strokes are ‘broad, fluid and relaxed’. Translating a world of floating moments and effortless motions. The characters are blended with the landscape. The same tonality of colors and the same brushstrokes are used for each of them. The artist captures a couple kissing, a girl dancing, a men smoking and a teenager sleeping. Never omitting to add-on the wandering, lingering rhythm which ends up altering the mood and spirit of the viewer.

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