Get Social:

Guido Mocafico’s Mesmerizing Snake Photos Will Get You lost In A Swirl Of Venomous Pattern

mocafico-photo1

mocafico-photo12

mocafico-photo4

If you’re Ophidiophobic, Guido Mocafico’s photo series “Serpens” (1-4) is not for you. Slithering, scaly, sinuous—snakes are one of the most widely reviled creatures on Earth. And yet Mocafico’s still-life photos of snakes in a box, including vipers and cobras, are absorbingly beautiful, full of color and pattern and twisting, supple shapes. In the collected photos of Serpens, which has also been published as a book by the same name, the snakes are like nature’s art swatches, rectangular and saturated.

“The first time I photographed a snake up close, I nearly fainted. I’d always found them terrifying, but also fascinating—an attraction-repulsion I think most people experience when they encounter beautiful animals that creep or crawl. My goal with this series is to explore that intersection of human emotions.”

“Serpens”, “Aranea” (Spiders), and “Medusa” (Jellyfish) comprise the trilogy “Venenum”, all shot on black backgrounds from above, all terrifyingly exquisite. Mocafico worked on these long-term personal projects, published in books and shown as gallery exhibitions, alongside his commercial and advertising activities.

“Each photography session takes about 45 minutes. The expert corrals the snakes into a cloth-lined, clear plastic-sided box. Then I stand two feet away, pull back the top, point my camera—I still prefer the look of film—and wait for patterns and curves to emerge.

This series has been good therapy and education for me: I can handle snakes now and have learned a lot about different species. But I’ve learned most by watching people react to these images. Their fear and desire reveals something primal about our species.”

Looking at these images, there is nothing inherently scary about these reptiles. On the contrary, they are gorgeous—their hues and markings lush and complex. By elevating snakes into art, Guido Mocafico makes us look, really look, at the mesmerizing source of our fear. (Via Juxtapoz. Artist quotes via National Geographic)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Mazzarella Thomas

Mazzarella Thomas paintings

 

In the world of Belgian painter Mazzarella Thomas tiny people are doing bizarre and interesting things.

 

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Twan van Keulen’s Typography Set made from Cut Leaves

 

We still have a month left of summer, but autumn will be here before we know it. And that means leaves. Everywhere. Here’s a cool little typography project to help ease the transition from season to season. Twan van Keulen is a graphic designer from the Netherlands. In a series called Falling Leaves, Van Keulen cut letters and symbols out of leaves and scanned the results, effectively creating a unique (well, it is kinda based off Helvetica) set of typography.  (via)

Currently Trending

Jacob Broms Engblom

treereadingsoftcore

I’d say that Jacob Broms Engblom is having a blast with his work. He definitely inserts his sideways sense of humor into his… pieces? Designs? Interactive animated post-modern brain benders? I need an appropriate label! Regardless, I’m thoroughly enjoying myself.

More images after the cut but really you just need to check out his sight for the full experience!

Currently Trending

Jan Otto Schreiber

-8

Jan Otto Schreiber, a photographer from Hamburg, Germany, decided to explore Australia last year. He traveled by cargo ship for two months, traveling on the Panama Canal, and in that time documented his surroundings with over 250 different shots of islands, ships, and the sea. He spent weeks editing the proofs of his documentation, and ended up with 14 dreamy images.

This series is titled: Somewhere Between the Shores. A yellow-tinged, pale collection of photographs that mimics the experience of quiet nostalgia, the subtle stillness of the ocean, and the mystery inside moving silhouettes.

Currently Trending

Awesome Video Of The Day: Blödes Orchester

Arranged like a symphony orchestra, approximately 200 antique vacuums, mixers and washers are transformed into musical instruments. They form an ensemble that the conductor, harpsichordist and composer Michael Petermann, alias weiserrausch.de, has now completed after eight years of preparation: The Stupid Orchestra.

Currently Trending

Awesome Video Of The Day: Deadbots Love 80’s Porn – NSFW

deadbots

If American Apparel made a retro lo-fi animation out of 80’s porn magazines and fluorescent poster board it would look like this Deadbots video. Watch the full video after the jump.

Currently Trending

The Poignant Story Of Courtroom Sketch Artist Gary Myrick

courtroom 2 Courtroomcourtroom 5

The prevalence of any technology forever alters the way we previously understood the world before it. Photography changed painting, audio recording changed our relationship to music, and the internet changed print media such as books and magazines. What is most often lost is the human touch, a closer connection from the source to the viewer or listener. Such is the story of courtroom sketch artist Gary Myrick, the focus of a documentary produced by Ramtid Nikzad of the New York Times as part of the Op-Doc series. A compelling figure who narrates the history of the tradition, Myrick  Myrick explains the difference and importance of his craft, “Illustration is story-telling. The difference between the camera in the courtroom and an artist might be the difference between just a cold, dry, factual transcript as opposed to a novel.” 

Beginning with Myrick explaining his work, the documentary covers the history of the medium, the advent and fall of courtroom photography, and the eventual decline of the courtroom sketch artist. “The artist at one time was the media,” says Myrick, relaying the history of artist documentarians, from war reporting through history to multi-tasking newspaper reporters who considered their drawings as important as their words. “When you funnel the story through a human being, its got a different quality than simply doing a mechanical recording of it,” says Myrick. “A lot of things going on about me are channeled through my heart, and my soul and my brain and my fingers…I like to convey just how it feels in that moment.”

Despite his immense talent, Myrick and so many other sketch artists are no longer able to work exclusively in the dying industry. Myrick poignantly notes, speaking more indicatively of so many industries that are being lost to the ease of technology, “I’m trying to draw to communicate to those that aren’t there, what it was like to be there. And maybe some of that has been getting lost.” (via juxtapoz and newyorktimes)

Currently Trending