Get Social:

Alice Aycock’s Exceptional Architectural Drawings

01Timescape4a_900_905 03Timescape5_900_90502Timescape3A_900_905

Alice Aycock is mostly known for her important oeuvre of sculptural and installation works, which have spanned decades and include exhibitions at some of the most important cultural institutions around the world. Aycock, however, is also a master draftswoman, creating works on paper that problem-solve her idea of “nonfunctional architecture,” often taking on forms reminiscent of diagrams and blueprints. As Aycock eloquently explains, the medium and its strengths are vastly different in 2 and 3-Dimensions – “Drawings aren’t bound by the physical—the imagination can run freely.

These sumptuously drawn pieces offer a new realm of possibilities, not simply tied to her sculptural works, but also a visual representation of how the artist’s mind and complex process unfolds. “Viewers are accustomed to seeing Ms. Aycock’s work in its final form, large-scale installations and outdoor sculptures, but her drawings show a mind at work, solving problems and breaking new ground. They also provide further evidence of her ideas and sources, offering clues to their meaning.”

Part of the exhibition series, ALICE AYCOCK Drawings: SOME STORIES ARE WORTH REPEATING, these drawings can be seen in a two-part drawing retrospective, the first of which was Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, NY and the Grey Art Gallery at New York University. The Exhibition then travels to University Art Museum at the University of California, Santa Barbara and the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, CA January 25th – April 19th, 2014. (via butdoesitfloat)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Vintage Photos Highlight The Devastation Of The 1968 D.C. Riots After Martin Luther Kings Death

1968-dc-riot11 1968-dc-riot10 1968-dc-riot5 1968-dc-riot3

The year 1968 was a tumultuous time in America’s history, and Washington, D.C. was often in the middle of controversy. Following the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., on April 4, 1968, six days of race riots erupted in the Nation’s capital. Dr. Darrell Clayton Crain Jr. captured parts of the event and put them on Kodachrome and Ektachrome slides. Thanks to technology, these were scanned in to the computer and digitized. They’re now featured on the Flickr account Posthumous DCC, along with other pictures throughout the years.

If you aren’t familiar with the riots, they started as news spread about King’s death. Crowds began to gather at 14th street and U. Stokely Carmichael, an activist who had parted ways with King in 1966 and removed as head of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in 1967, lead members of the SNCC to different neighborhoods. At first, they politely demanded that stores close out of respect. Eventually, the crowd became out of control and were breaking windows. Widespread looting started by 11PM (as well as in 30th other cities).

Things got worse in the following days. Anger was still evident and it resulted in violent confrontations with the DC police. Buildings were set on fire. Police unsuccessfully tried to control the crowds with tear gas, and eventually the National Guard was brought in. Marines mounted machine guns on the steps of the Capitol and army troops guarded the White House. It was the largest military occupation of any American city since the Civil War.

These vintage images showcase just how bad some of the destruction was. By the time the city was considered calmed down, 12 were killed (mostly in burning homes), 1,097 were injured, and over 6,100 were arrested. The devastation to property was $27 million (over $175 million today). Some neighborhoods in DC didn’t start to economically recover until the 1990’s.

See more of these powerful images on Flickr.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Illustrator Julia Kostreva Is Good On Paper

Julia Kostreva

Julia Kostreva

Illustrator & art director Julia Kostreva is a lady with many talents—whether it’s working on membership kits for creative co-lo hotspot Makeshift Society, web design for brands like Kodenko Jeans or creating intriguing artwork for The Dirty Projectors. After studying graphic design and printmaking at Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, Kostreva made the trek out to San Francisco, where she has rooted herself in a multi-faceted creative career. Kostreva has gone on to develop a series of simple, visually striking letterpress prints, notebooks, calendars and cards—in addition to textile patterns.

Currently Trending

Maria Rubinke’s Bloody Porcelain Sculptures Embody The Terrors Of Dark Forests And Nightmares

Maria Rubinke - Sculpture

Maria Rubinke - Sculpture Maria Rubinke - Sculpture Maria Rubinke - Sculpture

Maria Rubinke‘s porcelain sculptures are part Precious Moments, part Chucky — these are not your grandmother’s figurines. They instead embody all the terrors of the dark forest at night, the kind that Hansel and Gretel might have walked. Like fairy tales of yore, mishap after mishap seem to happen to these children. They wander the woods and lose an eye, or they sit in a bloody bathtub with a shark for a playmate. The calamities that befall Rubinke’s chubby cheeked cherubs seem endless.

One piece, “In between, with a fading dream,” depicts a young girl in a grove of inky black poisonous mushrooms, a frog — perhaps also poisonous — perched on her head. Though described as a dream, the scene is nothing short of nightmarish.

In the days leading up to Halloween, leave a little room in your nightmares for Rubinke’s vacant-eyed children. (via Cross Connect Magazine)

Currently Trending

Sam Songailo

IDTempo_Value
Austrailian Sam Songailo makes crazy technical paintings that have my brain in a serious frenzy. Florescent patterns ooze off the canvas like a Gee’s Bend quilt on mushrooms. Check out Iain Dawson Gallery for more. 

Currently Trending

Robert Wechsler’s Stunning Geometric Sculptures Created By Linking Coins

wechslersculpture7 wechslersculpture5 wechslersculpture2

These incredible coin sculptures were created by artist Robert Wechsler, who was commissioned by The New Yorker to create this work for their October 14th “Money” themed issued. Wechsler’s coin designs are crafted with money from varying countries of origin into geometric, fractal-like shapes. These shapes were created using a jeweler’s saw to cut out notches in the metal and then linked together with other coins. Wechsler has used coins for some of his past work, and most of his sculptures are created with objects from life’s seeming mundanity, like fingerprints, schooldesks, snails, a toaster, and an iron.

Wechsler writes, “Comfortably accustomed to everyday objects and spaces, we are blind to their unseen beauty and elegance. Who looks at a shopping cart or a toaster for the object itself? This state of static expectations is fertile ground for surprise.  It is a conscious re-examination of my subjects that re-instates the novel back into the familiar.  This is the moment of surprise, the moment we discover what is unseen in what is always seen. In reverence for what initially appears modest we get a small glimpse of the boundless elegance of our world.”(via exhibition-ism)

Currently Trending

Seth Casteels Underwater Dogs Signed Book & Print Giveaway!

If you remember a while back we posted the incredible photos of Seth Casteel last year and it was one of our most popular posts of the year. Thousands of BD fans responded and shared his fantastic underwater dog photography, so we’re excited to share 10 new  photos from his latest series on underwater dog photos.

To celebrate the launch of his new book “Underwater Dogs” Seth has generously given us a signed copy of the book as well as a signed 8×10 print of the photo that graces the cover of the book (pictured above) to giveaway to one of our lucky US readers . All you have to do is complete two very easy steps and win big. Just use the widget below to enter and you’re all set. The winner will be announced next Tuesday November 6th.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

Currently Trending

Michael Gaughan’s Visual Punchlines Bring Comedy To Art

Michael Gaughan

whoopsie  Michael Gaughan

Michael Gaughan raymond pettibon

Michael Gaughan represents a new breed of hyper-creative talents whose work spans an absurd amount of media. Known for a variety of projects (including city-wide scavenger hunts, his chat-roulette in a mock-dorm room rapping identity Ice Rod, and for renting out his apartment for couples needing a romantic getaway on Valentine’s Day), Gaughan creates with an almost child-like glee. Despite the playfulness in the work, however, there is a sophistication and consistency that separates it from most. This is particularly evident in his highly-technical watercolor paintings, where art-world in-jokes exist seamlessly with pop-culture rimshots. In an exclusive talk with Beautiful/Decay, Gaughan summarizes his motivations, “Humor is not my main medium, but definitely a consistent theme in my life and my artwork. I think that putting yourself out there in a vulnerable way is really uncomfortable and nerve-racking. It is a lot easier to do things as a joke rather than take yourself seriously, and simultaneously I am equally motivated by the possibility of brightening up someone else’s day. I ultimately want to bring joy to other people.

Gaughan’s work references “(art) history…obscenity, pop culture, absurdity, personal experiences, fears, feelings, misunderstandings, language, human experience, and creativity as well. Skate culture is great too!” When asked about the obvious amount of time spent on each work compared to the relatively short amount of time to elicit a humorous response (and if that adds to the joke), Gaughan responds, “Ha ha I hope so. It is also important to remember that punchlines can stay with you… Just because the audience can “get it” in seconds, doesn’t mean that they won’t revisit again it in their mind. I think art-work that takes longer to understand doesn’t necessarily mean that people will remember any longer than something that took only a second to get...”

Currently Trending