Get Social:

A Rubber Coated Basketball Court That Looks Like An Eye Popping Piet Mondrian Painting

ball4 ball3 ball2 ball1

A recent project set into motion by a group of creatives in Paris, namely Vincent Le Thuy, the brand Pigalle and a group of creative from Ill Studio combines sports, art, and design in this recent project. The Duperré playground has stood fully renovated in the 9th Arrondissement since July 1st and its presence brings a splash of color and light to the classical grey architecture of Paris.

The court is made from “noise absorbing recycled rubber’ which gives it plus points in both the realms of noise complaints and the environment. The floor and the walls of the court, which is wedged between two buildings, are made of this material, which adds to the surreal aspect of the place. The use of color blocking as well as square and rectangular shapes in the design are also artistic on a deeper level in the sense that they are visually reminiscent of the work of Piet Mondrian.

This basketball court is a true trans medium work of art in the sense that it transcends the conceptual aspects of sports and design and brings it all home by being more than a concept and by being both an aesthetic and urban improvement. The technical aspects of the court eliminate noise pollution while the bright primary colors bring a splash of sunlight the Parisian urban décor.

Photos by Sebastien Michelini & Kevin Couliau

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Ivonne Dippmann

i_will_call_you_m

Ivonne Dippmann’s unflattering, raw, and distorted drawings of hefty men in disguises is not what one would describe as “gorgeous.” But it is, maybe not right off the bat, but the obvious attention to the design and detail of shape, texture, and mark-making pulls these into one heck of a killer style of drawing.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Comedy Central Backdrop Dumb Starbucks Tricks All Of Los Angeles Into Thinking It Is A Conceptual Art Piece

Bf6mxKxCMAETBbl BgE6CUiCQAAotE1 BgGAZe7CAAAJLfA

Dumb Starbucks, a parody store located in a Los Angeles strip mall, opened its doors on February 7th, 2014. From the sign up front, to the cd’s next to the cash register, everything  had original Starbucks branding except for the fact that the word dumb was printed in front of each and every SB logo.

The author of DS was unknown until earlier this week, when comedian Nathan Fielder held a press conference at the parody store revealing that he was responsible. Until then, Conceptual artist Marc Horowitz was taking credit for it on Twitter:

“Would love to do interviews about #dumbstarbucks — just waiting for @TODAYshow or @jimmykimmel” as well as “my project is causing quite a stir – lol.”

After the mystery was solved, Nathan Fielder released a  video in the Dumb Starbucks youtube channel that assured his newfound ‘customers’  that DS  was “no joke, this is a real business,” a business, he says,”from which I plan to get rich from.” The serious sounding Fielder, assures that he can keep it going, however, yesterday (February 10th, 2014)  the city of Los Angeles closed the place down due to a lack of health permits. It is hard to believe that that was the only reason for the shutdown , as the real Starbucks was not happy with the parody coffee shop calling itself Dumb Starbucks.

“We appreciate the humor but they can’t use our name,” Starbucks spokesman Jim Olson told CNNMoney. “It’s a protected trademark. It’s our trademark.”

Currently Trending

Rebecca Reeve’s Photographs Of The Everglades Recall Holland Funerary Traditions

rebecca_reeve12 rebecca_reeve rebecca_reeve6 rebecca_reeve7

In photographer Rebecca Reeve’s series Marjory’s World I, she captures Floridian landscapes that reference a late 19th century Holland tradition. The idyllic scenes depict the swampy Everglades of long grasses, lily pads, and a lot of standing water. Framing each image is a set of curtains that blow in the wind.  This is inspired by an old practice where during the wake of the deceased, it was customary to cover all of the mirrors, landscape paintings, and portraits in the home with clothes.  Doing so makes it easier for the soul to depart the body and subdues any temptations to stay in this world.

Marjory’s World I is Reeve’s own interpretation of this act. To her, the ritual was confirmation of the deep connections and experiences we have with the natural environment. It also gave her a way to contextualize her fleeting time spent in the Everglades; All of these images were produced during her Airie Artist in Residence Program. Since she couldn’t take with her when she leaves, this symbolic act made it easier to depart.

In addition to the personal connection the artist draws from the work, to us it recalls the distance that many of us have to this untouched landscape. As we continue to develop an increasingly urban existence, these thrift-store fabrics create a window to the unfamiliar. (Via Artsy Forager)

Currently Trending

“Timestack” Landscape Photographs Create Incredible Skies

Matt Molloy photography2Matt Molloy photography4

Matt Molloy photography5

The colorful skies of Matt Molloy‘s photographs nearly seem built from dozens of chunky brush strokes.  However, these photographs are actually a type of time lapse photography which Molloy calls “timestacks”.  Molloy shoots several photographs of the same location or image over a specific period of time.  He then takes those photographs and merges them into one image.  For the timestack photographs featured here, Molloy merges huge amounts of images – up to 500 photographs for only one image!  [via]

Currently Trending

Kara Walker’s Gigantic Sugar-Coated Female Sphinx Makes A Powerful Statement

1 320140427-kara-slide-iok3-slide

Kara Walker’s new sculpture “A Subtlety” is pure white, coated in 160,000 pounds of bleached sugar; with this modern take on the ancient sphinx, the legendary artist crafts a towering black face in honor of the slave laborers who worked in sugar cane fields. The powerful work is meant to address racial and sexual exploitation; like the sugar that coats her polystyrene core, this black female figure has been pressured, against nature, into succumbing to whiteness.

The work is now on display at the old Williamsburg, Brooklyn Domino sugar factory shed, where it reaches to the ceiling and extends for a magnificent 75 feet. The mythical creature is a powerful assertion of the black female self; the face quite resembles the artists’ own, and a carefully wrought bandana subtly references the stereotypical (and often offensive) symbol of the mammy, a slave woman who nurtured and brought up white children. Walker has been the subject of debate in the past for her use of contested imagery, and despite the controversy surrounding the “mammy” figure, she is presented here as powerful and divine.

Like the ancient sphinxes of Egypt and Greece, Walker’s monolithic creation is godly, simultaneously fearsome and comforting. The sphinx, known for protecting the tombs of royalty, becomes the guardian of history, interrupting a white-washed historical narrative to make visible the labor of the men and women who were kept enslaved. Her face is serene, assured, and unyielding. The sphinx character, in addition to being a protector, is also dangerous, renowned for devouring those who cannot answer her riddle; Walker’s sphinx is similarly confrontational in her overwhelming size, forcing viewers to confront the complex and painful history of American industry. (via The New York Times)

Currently Trending

Jon Rafman Wraps Entire Rooms With Classic Paintings

Monet Master Bedroom

Monet Master Bedroom

Lichtenstein Moe's Tavern

Lichtenstein Moe’s Tavern

Matisse Nursery

Matisse Nursery

O'Keeffe Lobby

O’Keeffe Lobby

Basquiat Classroom

Basquiat Classroom

For his ongoing project titled “Brand New Paint Job,” artist Jon Rafman transforms domestic and familiar settings by imagining them as classic paintings. Using recognizable patterns and paintings from artists such as Basquiat, Lichtenstein, Picasso, Monet, O’Keeffe, Haring, Duchamp, de Kooning, and Matisse, Rafman wraps nurseries, living rooms, bedrooms, and familiar television sets like Star Trek, Jeopardy!, and Seinfeld, turning these works into 3D living spaces. In order to create these imagined spaces, Rafman finds 3D models from Google 3D Warehouse, an online gallery where Google Sketchup users upload their work.

Of his project, Rafman says, “The BNPJ interiors started off as a play on interior design chic. Historically, the greatest fear of the painter was that his work would become design objects. Now it’s common for contemporary artists to take inspiration from commercial visual culture. The design of a Nike cross trainer or a Samsung monitor is as important to contemporary art practice as intense light and dark shadows are to baroque painting. I’m exploring the line between art and design, in which a great work of art can be reduced to a shrinkwrap or add-on surface and functional objects and spaces elevated to the purposelessness of artwork. I’m interested in those forced marriages.” (via my modern met)

Currently Trending

Vintage L.L. Bean Catalog Covers Recreated As Photograph

 

Ever since I was a little kid I remember flipping through the L.L. Bean catalog. I never really bought anything from them but I always thought of them as a heritage brand and a classic symbol for Americana. To celebrate their 100th anniversary L.L. Bean tapped famed photographer Randal Ford to recreate their popular  Spring 1933 catalog cover using local residents from Maine’s Acadia National Park. L.L. Bean documented the entire photo shoot in all its outdoorsy glory with a short behind the scenes documentary. Witness how a vintage painting gets transformed into a modern photograph after the jump!

Currently Trending