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Human Guts Filmed With Pill-Cam Digesting Food, Look Like Something From Space

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“Journey to the Center of the Gut” is the artistic duo Sam Bompas and Harry Parr’s answer to “food pornography” images posted on Instagram; in asking celebrity chef Gizzi Erskine to swallow a SynMed pill-cam, they provide a more raw and intimate view of human consumption. The minuscule camera filmed Erskine’s insides as it passed through her digestive tract, and a live audience of hundreds was invited to witness the process. At times, the expert chef ate jelly beans, which, to the delight of all, bounced about before the camera.

The project, presumably titled after Jules Verne’s “Journey to the Center of the Earth,” places our modern aesthetic fascination with food within a more profound and cosmic context. By comparison, Instagram food images seem frivolous and relatively insubstantial; Bompas and Parr’s images are scientific and therefore authoritative, presenting the gut—normally considered to be a vulgar organ—with reverent medicinal care. At times, organs appear like fiery celestial bodies, commanding our attention.

These images, in contrast to prettily polished and filtered “food porn” shots, are dangerously vulnerable; their subject is soft, naked, sensitive tissue, and the SynMed pill-cam is capable of revealing potential problems in Erskine’s system (Bompas is pleased to report that her digestive organs are perfectly healthy). Juxtaposed against the glamour of the famous chef, whose careful updos and fashionable manner mirror those of old Hollywood starlets, the crude images are stronger for their entirely unpredictable, visceral portrayal of her inner self.

In a world where we’re tasked with consuming an impossible amount of imagery, ”Journey to the Center of the Gut” reminds us of the physicality of consumption. Amidst a plethora or celebrity chefs, cooking shows, diet books, and food porn, the project reminds us of the basic fact of our digestion; it doesn’t have to be pretty, but it’s something we all share. (via HuffPost)

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Electrifying light bulb sculptures of Hitoshi Kuriyama

Hitoshi Kuriyama creates elaborate light installations using complex clusters of shattered fluorescent light bulbs. With Kuriyama, fluorescent lights and LEDs become life forces that animate the darkness of the universe with an irregular, unpredictable rhythm.

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Japanese Designer Fangophilia Molds Silver Into Edgy, Armor-Like Accessories

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Japanese designer Fangophilia (Taro Hanabusa) creates edgy silver accessories made from molds of isolated body parts: teeth, ears, cheeks, kneecaps, fingers, and more. Some of his more frequent designs consist of custom-fit fangs and claw-like finger extensions, but his oeuvre also consists of gauntlets and face-plates redolent of medieval armor. Trained in dentistry and fascinated by body modifications, Hanabusa became curious about what would happen if dental molds were used to alter the appearance of the body, and in June 2012 he started his own brand, Fangophilia.

Each silver accessory is molded to an individual’s form. While ears and knees might generally look similar, all have their own anatomical deviations, making Hanabusa’s creations as unique as the bodies they adorn. In a fascinating interview with Tokyo Fashion, Hanabusa discusses the effect of working so closely with his clients and their unique bodies, saying it makes him feel “connected with [his] customers,” more so “than those who only sell their items only through shops.” In this way, he is very much like a tattoo artist or a piercer, consulting his clients directly in the achievement of their desired look.

The aesthetic impact of Fangophilia’s work is dark and powerful. It’s alternative fashion with a vampiric edge. And even though Hanabusa is no longer a dentist, there is something intriguingly “clinical” or “surgical” about his designs: sharp metal is placed in intimate proximity with the skin, creating an effect that wavers between cold sterility and the shining beauty of silver. Furthermore, as the name “Fangophilia” suggests, there is an element of fetish in his work; by accessorizing (or armoring) a specific detail on the body, you bring attention and erotic curiosity to it. Plates of metal on the cheeks, for example, accentuate the sensual curve of a jawline. This allure is not to be taken lightly, however, for like suits of armor, Hanabusa’s designs exude both beauty and tremendous strength.

Fangophilia was in Los Angeles last November, so follow his Facebook page to keep up with his latest work and see where he tours next. His website can be found here. Tokyo Fashion’s article is another great resource, and it provides an exclusive, behind-the-scenes video showing Hanabusa’s shoot for his first lookbook, the photos from which are displayed on this page. (Via Tokyo Fashion)

Credits: Photographer: KIRA. Models: Hirari Ikeda, Hidemi Tsukata, Sioux, Shunsuke Okabe, Machiko.

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Rebecca Steele’s Punk Philosophy

Rebecca Steele’s photographs use a sort-of-handmade-but-still-slick type of light and color to make everything objects, like knickknack figurines and trees, feel new.  It’s like you’ve just landed on Earth, and the spotlight on your spacecraft is pointing wildly into the night sky in Washington State hitting two red and green lifeforms, this is the first Earth tree you’ve seen.  Punk meets philosophy, and the wiser punk echoes your grandparents: stop and smell the roses.

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Beth Campbell’s Artwork Is Toying With Your Perception

Blue Lamps, 2010

Blue Lamps, 2010

Stereo Table, 2012

Stereo Table, 2012

Bookshelf Loveseat, 2013

Bookshelf Loveseat, 2013

My parent’s bathroom at the house I first lived in had a full-length mirror behind the sink, which also had a mirror.  As soon as I was tall enough to see over the counter, I remember staring at an infinite number of my own reflections bouncing back and forth and I recall the frustration that I could never find where the reflections ended.  This is the memory invoked when I saw Beth Campbell’s work for the first time.

Working in a variety of mediums: drawings, sculpture and what she calls “architectural interventions,” Campbell’s body of work toys with perception.  Her Potential Future Based on Present Circumstances drawing series maps possible outcomes to present decisions.  These were the first works I saw by Campbell and I recall thinking how brilliant, but impossible they were.  Like me and my reflection in the mirror, Campbell was trying to make sense of the unrealistic and perhaps impractical idea that we can know what might have been.  Their humor and neurosis seemed so quintessentially human to me that I became an instant lover of her work.

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Grady Gordon

Weirdly wonderful monoprints by Grady Gordon.
Grady Gordon - Prints

Grady Gordon - Prints

Grady Gordon - Prints

Grady Gordon - Prints

Grady Gordon - Prints

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Denis Carrier

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French illustrator Denis Carrier keeps his images simple but his ideas profound. His work was featured in B/D Book 3 and he co-founded PNTS design studio. Carrier’s clean imagery is a breath of fresh air, employing uncommon ingenuity to modern-day icons.

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Switch Notes: A New Look Post-It Hits The Market

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A new invention redesigning sticky notes has a 50/50 chance of becoming successful.  Switch Notes by suck uk stationary store, was created with the same thought in mind as a refrigerator magnet or bulletin board; used as a simple tool to help remember “things to do”. The original sticky note was invented in 1968 by 3M chemist Dr. Spencer Silver. At the time, he was looking for an adhesive that could stick to things and be reused or repositioned multiple times. He proceeded to invent low-tack tape. This was released on the first sticky note marketed as Press ‘n Peel back in 1977. Its yellow color came from the scrap paper used in tests and in 1980, the product was reintroduced as Post-it Notes.

The new and improved humorous design of Switch Notes is slightly different from post-its, because it has a light hole switch in the middle. This added feature enables the user to put it on a light switch doubling the reminder value. The design is greener and saves paper, but according to initial feedback, isn’t sticky enough and tends to fall off when placed.  If so, it kinda defeats the purpose of “no brainer convenience”. Does it really make sense to take another step and place something deliberately on a light switch? And what if you forget to shut off the light, then what? Late fee.

Still, those who love anything new and different will buy into it. The company suck uk who makes Switch Notes, specializes in unique items for the home. Some of their bestsellers include an LED light which turns old bottles into lamps and an umbrella which changes colors when rain hits it.  (via lostateminor.com)

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