Get Social:

D-BROS’ Mirrored Teacups Create Geometric Harmony With Their Saucers

D-BROS - Pottery D-BROS - Pottery D-BROS - Pottery

D-BROS, a Japanese design company that produces ultra-modern housewares, has crafted the beautiful Waltz Cup and Saucer — a teacup with a mirrored, palladium finish that reflects the geometric patterns of the plate on which it is placed. The product is well-named, for like two dancers, the saucer and cup must be in proximity and working together in order to create a work of art. The product is made out of Hasami porcelain on the island of Kyushu in southern Japan, which is known as one of the world’s great pottery hubs. Each cup is carefully handmade so that the surfaces are completely smooth; “after all, even the slightest scratch would create distortions throughout the reflection.” (Source)

The cups, once removed from their beautiful saucer-companions, will of course reflect everything else surrounding them — the color of your sweater, or whatever ordinary items are lying around your kitchen table, for example. And at ¥7560 (approximately $62.00 USD) per set, the cups and saucers are less practical than a piece of art, but there is something to be said for the integration of art, geometry, harmony, tranquility into our everyday lives; interestingly, these are the spiritual and aesthetic values which are present in the Japanese traditional practice of tea ceremonies (Chanoyu), wherein the functionality and practicality of drinking tea is subsumed into ritualistic acts that achieve refinement, simplicity, beauty, and peace. Thinking of it this way, there is much significance to be appreciated in the harmony and creativity ingrained in D-BROS’ designs.

While sold out elsewhere, the Waltz Cups and Saucers can still be bought from D-BROS. Visit their website and explore some of their other intriguing designs. (Via Laughing Squid)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Fantastical Narratives Examine The Female Condition

Jenny Toth - Drawing

Jenny Toth - DrawingJenny Toth - Drawing

Whether it’s hand painted, collaged, and/or sewn together, Jenny Toth imaginatively entwines colorful drawings of the animal kingdom to meditate on a sometimes humorous, and always surreal study of the female condition.

Of her work, Toth states, “For many years I have been intrigued by the way women artists choose to depict themselves. Like many other artists, my view dramatically differs from a historical approach to the female model. I choose to include elements not traditionally viewed as beautiful—for example, a deformed toe, hairy legs, unkempt hair. However I have no interest in shocking the viewer, but seek to share my honest, uncensored observations. I have always been allergic to pretense and slickness.”

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

JeongMoon Choi’s Glowing 3D Threadwork

Korean artist JeongMoon Choi uses surprisingly simple materials to create installations that appear to be pulled off the computer screen.  Simply using thread and UV lights JeongMoon illuminates complex geometric patterns.  The arranged thread patterns glow against the dark space at times resembling three dimensional plans.  Her installations explore the gallery space, both literally and conceptually.  Glowing angles bounce off walls and ceilings  emphasizing an architectural space that typically tries to not attract notice.

Currently Trending

David R Harper Embroiders The Void Of Death

David R Harper - EmbroideryDavid R Harper - Embroidery  David R Harper - Embroidery David R Harper - Embroidery Detail

David R Harper’s artwork is about the projection or imposition of meaning on an object, especially concerning memorial in death. He embroiders over taxidermy animals on prints of still life paintings from the 18th century. He sees the dead animals as a human way of addressing mortality; feeling empathy for the dead animal, but also as a way of avoiding grappling with our own inevitable demise. The embroidery creates a void or emptiness, especially literal in the white thread, and more dynamic but equally vacant with the use of green patterning in The Fall. Thread operates in most cases as a cold medium and Harper employs it extremely effectively in combination with his meticulous technique.

His most ambitious work is titled I Tried, and I Tried, and I Tried, presumably a quasi-reference to the Rolling Stones song (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction, as well as Napoleon’s conquests. Harper embroiders the entire horse of David’s Napoleon Crossing the Alps. In the original artwork the horse is mostly white with black on its tail and head, where Harper creates a gradient that transforms from black to light grey. What is truly incredible is that this process doesn’t flatten the horse; it retains its form in the sculpting of the flow of the thread. The beast becomes much more powerful and haunting

Art Info has a great slideshow that compares Harper’s sculpture and embroidery work to other well-known artists. See it here.

Currently Trending

Last Week TO SUBSCRIBE TO GET A FREE LIMITED EDITION ZINE WITH YOUR FIRST BOOK!

Beautiful/Decay is honoring its DIY zine roots by teaming up with 5 artists from around the country to bring you their limited edition zines. Mailed exclusively to Beautiful/Decay subscribers, each copy of Beautiful/Decay Book:8 will come complete with
it’s very own zine. Each B/D subscriber will receive a different zine blind packed into their issue. These zines are not available in stores, only B/D subscribers will receive them. Subscribe today to make sure you get your hands on one of these exclusive zines. Read about the talented zine makers after the jump and click on the subscribe link to reserve your copy of Beautiful/Decay Book:8 with the limited edition zine today!

Currently Trending

Paul Chatem

Paul Chatem washed up worn downFriday night is gonna be quite a night for art, folks.  I am very excited to see Paul Chatem’s “The Death of Bighead” at Cave Gallery.  Not only does Paul have an awesome style, but he makes interactive paintings!  You can turn the gears and crank his artwork to your heart’s content.  It’s hard to think of anything more fun than that.  After the jump, you can watch some videos of his multimedia madness in motion.  I’ll see you at the opening tomorrow evening!

Currently Trending

NADA Art Fair Miami 2013 Highlights

dogsweird creature

NADA (New Art Dealers Alliance), founded in 2002, is a not-for-profit art fair that showcases international galleries in New York, Miami Beach, and Cologne. NADA’s exhibitors are a breath of fresh air; the young vibe, the weirdness, and progressiveness of this exposition is hard to dismiss.

Here, I gather the most interesting works at the expo:

Estonian artist Kris Lemsalu sculpts and stages grotesque figures. In this particular set, it seems, are two very strange looking dogs(?), wrapped around sleeping bags. I’m not sure what is artist is going for here, but it seems to me that he is trying to set a scene, and a specific one at that. Both ‘dogs’ are covering their eyes, they are wrapped tightly, and they hovering amongst themselves; might it be that these are scared ‘dogs’ at an estranged camp of sorts?

Jonathan Torres, a Puerto Rican artist, creates half-animal, half-human sculptures, that are brightly colored and full of feathers. They are on the floor, nor are the hanging from the upright walls, instead they appear in odd places, throughout the tiny booth of the http://crenaz.byethost22.com/.

Currently Trending