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Awesome Video Of The Day: Photoshop Tutorial Rap

This one goes out to all my fellow pixel pushers who sacrifice baby goats to the almighty Adobe gods.

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Colorful Mounds of Sugar Form Fantasy Landscapes in Pip and Pop’s Installation Work

 

These bright, candied installation pieces are the work of Australian artist Tanya Schultz. Working under the name Pip & Pop, Schultz employs sugar, glitter, fake flowers, and a myriad of other materials to produce the colorful mounds of awesomeness. It’s not a far stretch to picture the works as actual landscapes- to fantasize about walking around in Pip & Pop’s unique world. Diabetes was never so easy on the eyes ’til now. More after the jump. (via)

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Them Thangs Magazine

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Longtime B/D friend Justin Blyth just released the Them-Thangs magazine, a massive folded poster featuring a gang of insane images, photography, and design. If you’re a fan of the popular blog then make sure to pick this up. Congrats Justin!

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Jasmine Golestaneh

Jasmine Golestaneh creates fantastical collages using bats and rainbows to explore rituals and the subconscious.

If you’d like to catch her work in person, she has a solo show on June 28th at Envoy Enterprises in NYC.

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Yoan Capote’s Landscapes Made Of Thousands Of Fishhooks Illustrate The Complexities Of Life In Cuba

Yoan Capote - Painting

Yoan Capote - Painting

Yoan Capote - Painting

Yoan Capote - Painting

Cuba’s 3,570 mile coastline, nestled in the Caribbean Ocean has seen everything from glamorous vacation resorts to the horrors of revolution. But as Cuban artist, Yoan Capote shows us in his Isla (Island) series, the heart of Cuba is her relationship to the water.

Capote’s collection of canvases illustrate the beauty and turbulence of the sea. He says,

“the sea is an obsession for any island country .. it represents the seductiveness of dreams but at the same time danger and isolation.”

In the Isla series, Capote captures that feeling by utilizing fishhooks to create texture and density on his large canvases. At first glance, the works seem to be made of heavy oil but upon closer inspection you see that each wave in his ocean scape is an individual fishhook that has been painstakingly painted and nailed into place by Capote and his team. Layer after layer of fishhooks creates a physically dangerous work. If you aren’t careful, it could stab you. Capote says, “I wanted to use thousands of fishhooks to create a surface that would be almost tangible to the viewer upon their approach.” Accomplished.

The result of this intense work is not only the undulating motion of the sea, but it is a comment on Cuba’s situation, more generally. The fishhooks are a symbol of Cuba’s fishing trade and they illustrate its perilous borders but through this work Capote is also able to point to economic issues, emigration, and political isolation thus evoking a shared sense of uncertainty about the future of the country.

This collection can be seen at Ben Brown Fine Arts, London, until 29 January 2016.

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Pieter Hugo’s Portraits Reveal Skin Impurities To Comment On Race And Beauty

Federica Angelucci, Cape Town, 2011

Federica Angelucci, Cape Town, 2011

Ulrica Knutsdotter, Cape Town, 2011

Ulrica Knutsdotter, Cape Town, 2011

Rob van Vuuren, Cape Town, 2011

Rob van Vuuren, Cape Town, 2011

Pieter Hugo, a South African photographer, plays with color channel manipulation to create portraits that highlight the impurities on his subject’s skin to make a statement about race, the colonial experiment in South Africa, and contemporary ideas of beauty.

There’s a Place in Hell for Me and My Friends entails portraits of the artist’s friends- all whom call South Africa their home. Through the manipulation of color, Hugo emphasizes the sitter’s blemishes and sun damage making them look darker than they would normally appear without the editing process.

In these portraits one sees how the sitters’ environment, a place where there is incredibly harsh sunlight, has started to ‘corrode’ our epidermis. This speaks to me about the South African colonial experiment – all these people from all over the world, thrown together within the confines of a nation by the forces of history. The damage left by the sun and the environment becomes allegorical of the burden of South Africa’s tempestuous and fraught past. History leaves its marks on us. It eats away at us. We cannot escape its heavy weight.

Besides the political allegories found in the work, Hugo is also interested in highlighting the errors of racial distinction by revealing that beneath it all, beneath our skin, we all look the same. As the critic Aaron Schuman writes about Hugo’s work, “although at first glance we may look ‘black’ or ‘white’, the components that remain ‘active’ beneath the surface consist of a much broader spectrum. What superficially appears to divide us is in fact something that we all share, and like these photographs, we are not merely black and white – we are red, yellow, brown, and so on; we are all, in fact, colored.” (Images via Stevenson)

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Burritos Are The Gateway Drug To Fame

sol-poster1Everyones favorite burrito chain is having a video contest for the best homage to the Chipotle menu. Pick your favorite item (I personally love the Veggie Burrito with Corn Salsa) and make a creative short. The crazier the better! Read more about the contest at the I Love Foil  website.

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Karin Waskiewicz’s Carved Abstract paintings

Karin Waskiewicz‘s paintings directly address the physical properties of painting utilizing both conventional and unconventional methods. Waskiewicz’s process beings with acrylic paint applied in thick layers creating a collection of colors to later be unveiled. After the layers are applied, one mark is made. Every mark is a reaction to the shape, placement, and color of the previous marks made. The painting emerges from dry paint as she carves away, excavating the thick surface, intuitively revealing and investigating the depth of the paint, creating a world in paint alone. These paintings reflect formations found in the natural world and the shapes created are both organic and formulated. The repetition of marks connects visually and gives the paintings a vibrational quality and mimic movement. See Karins work in a group show opening April 26th in NYC at Schroeder Romero & Shredder.

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