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Dancing With Light

dancing dancing with light

Nuance from Marc-Antoine Locatelli on Vimeo.

This short video by French artist Marc-Antoine Lucatelli features dancer Lucas Boirat as he uses his body to manipulate an image of shape-shifting geometric light that is sourced from his hands. The energy behind Boirat’s dancing paired with the abstract energy of light gives this video and these gifs the effect of a push and pull between Boirat and the light. Boirat seems to dance to effect the balance of power between light and shadow, with the light ultimately returning to dust at the hands of Boirat. These modern martial arts inspired dance moves paired with the dreamy experimental music of EdIT create an experience that feels at once primal and futuristic. I find myself completely engrossed with Lucatelli’s video and the way he beautifully captures this stunning power struggle. (via my modern met)

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Matthew Simmonds Sculpts Miniature Sacred Interiors Out Of Solid Pieces Of Stone That Absorb The Imagination

Matthew Simmonds - SculptureMatthew Simmonds - SculptureMatthew Simmonds - SculptureMatthew Simmonds - Sculpture

Inner architectural worlds open up in the works of Matthew Simmonds. Beginning his career as a student of art history at the University of East Anglia, the artist gradually moved into sculptural and architectural work, studying stone carving at Weymouth College and later participating in the restoration of several notable monuments, including Westminster Abbey and the cathedrals of Salisbury and Ely. Following these experiences, he began working on his stone sculptures, applying his combined knowledge of history, architecture, and stonework to carve miniature sculptures depicting hallowed interiors.

Simmonds’ works are masterpieces of perception. Despite their small scale, his sculptures absorb the viewer’s imagination with illusions of infinite space; under sunlit arches, through dark corridors, and up monolithic steps, one can almost hear the reverberation of the voice, the lifting of the soul as it passes through deep, sacred spaces. Light plays an important role, warming and chilling the stone and accentuating the finely-hewn details. Invoking architectural styles from ancient and medieval histories, Simmonds visually and emotionally connects us with a Western cultural past; as his artist’s statement compellingly describes, “Drawing on the formal language and philosophy of architecture, the work explores themes of positive and negative form, the significance of light and darkness, and the relationship between nature and human endeavour “ (Source)

Visit Simmonds’ website to see an impressive collection of his work.

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Studio Visit: Ryan Schneider

I headed over to Brooklyn to check out what Ryan Schneider had cooking after not seeing his work for a year.  He was painting when I got there; mixing a fleshly color on the big glass palette in the center of the room.  Canvases lined the walls, some were finished and some were in progress.  He paints all the nouns: people, places and things; and does so in a thoughtful way that reflects life.  Still lifes which range from bathtubs to bookshelves, and landscapes which seem to suggest an alternate, more romantic reality.

The paintings are populated with figures, and he had interesting things to say about figure painting.  In person, the paintings are very obviously physical.  They combine juicy paint, carved-in-words, bold colors, and a funky sense of space.  This makes for paintings which flip between pattern and illusion.  His new paintings were confident, and maybe even more colorful and spatially complex than his previous work.  Schneider recently left Priska C Juschka, his gallery of several years.  Besides being a painter, Schneider is also a curator and has organized high profile group shows in locations near and far, and he was at it again.  He is behind a show which just opened in Austin, at Champion Contemporary, called “Wild Beasts.”   He included a group of artists who share a love of color and admiration for Matisse and the French Fauves.  Read some of our discussion after the jump.

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The Vivid Spots, Swirls And Girls of Andres Guzman

Andres Guzman is a Peruvian artist based in Minneapolis, Minnesota and also 1/3 of the art and music collective STEAKMOB.  He’s an artist I’m surprised we haven’t already featured before.  STEAKMOB is a loose crew of creatives who do everything from design to sounds to illustration.  They invite anyone who is their creative  to work with them in their space (an attic studio).  “We just love to make stuff for the eyes and the ears,” states Andres.  Which I think to “the T” describes Andres perfectly.  He has always been drawing and experimenting, trying out new techniques and mediums to further expand his artistic vision.
Andres is a force to be reckoned with when it comes to his sketching ability.  He never ceases to have new journal entries to share of ladies and heated Midwestern narratives, a vast portfolio of hand-drawn typography, and a keen sense of nailing portraiture.  Andres is currently working on a music video animation for Tame Impala, and working with Colonel Blimp UK.  I included more illustration samples than the usual after the jump because he has so many golden pieces on his tumblr and his other blog!  All of his portfolios are worth your time to check out and contemplate.

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Alison Moyna Greene Finds Balance Between Pain And Beauty In Her Seemingly Tranquil Mandalas Made From Spines of Cacti And Rose Thorns

Alison Moyna Greene - Cactus Spines, Ink, WoodAlison Moyna Greene - Cactus Spines, Ink, WoodGreene24

In the endless patterns of mandalas, one can find tranquility through its sacred geometry. You can find this peace in the spiraling colors of the mandalas artist Alison Moyna Greene creates. However, things are not always what they seem in her work. What is mesmerizing and calm at first glance is actually rough and defensive up close. The artist constructs her mandalas with individual cactus spines that jut out of the surface at the viewer. The process of using such a harmful medium by hand does not only take an intense focus, but also can be physically harmful. However, this meditative process of picking this material, painting them individually, and placing them onto their surface is a practice of care and love. Greene takes something painful and turns it into beauty.

The incredibly metaphor for transformation and healing is realized through this intricate series. The artist explains that her work acknowledges the coexistence of light and darkness and explores the balance of both necessary elements. The mandala is a traditional symbol of harmony. In this harmony, we find brilliant colors and winding patterns. However, we also find sharp, unsafe objects that make up this symbol. This contrast makes Greene’s work even more beautiful as she finds comfort in the amazing transformation of suffering into serenity.

This series of artwork uses thorns and cactus spines as a metaphor of changing pain and suffering. The process of hand plucking, hand painting and hand placing speaks about the transformation of pain into beauty and fear into love.

– Alison Moyna Greene

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David Samuel Stern Physically Weaves Portraits Together, Showing Two Different Sides Of His Subjects

David Samuel Stern - Woven Photographic Portrait David Samuel Stern - Woven Photographic Portrait

Brooklyn based artist David Samuel Stern takes still photographs, and fuses them together so that they appear to be in motion. He begins by taking two portraits of the same person, and then carefully and meticulously cuts them apart before physically weaving them back into one another. This not only creates amazing texture and an interesting checkered pattern, but combines physical features until the composition.

become a hybrid of two faces. With a light and airy palette, these breathtaking photographic prints become ghosts of themselves, two versions or the same person. Two different emotions are often present, creating an interesting dichotomy of the internal character. We are seeing two sides of the subjects, as the weaving alters and skews our perspective. Stern’s highly original technique abstracts the portraits so that they seem to be caught in mid motion. Both original images become blurred after they are combines by weaving. The once crisp photographic prints are transformed by their alteration, creating a painterly atmosphere. David Samuel Stern’s method is simple yet powerful, exposing two sides of each of his subjects. However, the abstraction present in his work also hides elements and details of the portraits as well.

You can see David Samuel Stern’s mesmerizing, photographic work on view at the BAM Harvey Theater in New York City from September 16 through December 20th.

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Reid Peppard


Yes, that is a guinea pig comb/head piece. It was created by Reid Peppard, a British taxidermist. Her pieces take animals commonly perceived as vile pests and turns them into fashion items. Peppard says, “…when they become sculptural headpieces, necklaces and cuff-links, the specimens cease to be waste and become objects to behold. RP/ENCORE makes use of the city’s leftovers.” Would you be comfortable wearing this stuff?

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Neil Mota’s Models Of The Caribbean

Neil Mota brings together the beauty of fashion photography and Pirates of The Caribbean costumes and accessories. This certainly is a tough task but Neil has managed to create an accomplished body of work that does it with ease.

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