Get Social:

Chanel Von Habsburg-Lothringen’s Unsettling Photos Of Masked Figures

cluelessmompossibilities grannylingery postpartumdepressionidontwanttodothenurturinganymore pyroetdavinci

Women at different stages of their lives posing in seductive, awkward and humorous poses. Chanel Von Habsburg-Lothringen, in her series ‘Seduced and Abandoned’, creates photo collages with singular elements and wide close ups of skin and hair. Using her own method, she depicts the theme of abandonment. A testimonial of events from her past and feelings left from a traumatic up-bringing.

Chanel Von Habsburg-Lothringen collects 1970’s National Geographics. She is influenced by the unusual lay out of the ads. She also uses poses from 1980’s magazines archives as inspiration for her shootings. The exaggerated close ups and the appearance of elements such as medical supplies, a doll and a set of false teeth attract the viewer despite the oddity of the pictures. Most of the props were used by the artist’s grandmother and evoke fragility and mortality.
One of the major component of the work is the use of a plastic mask and a wig. Generating an unsettling feeling, it increases the viewer’s curiosity of knowing more about the person hiding behind the mask. The grouped images, piled up in one area of the frame creates a claustrophobic feeling.

It is of course all orchestrated by the artist. Her purpose is to trigger an introspection.
By displaying domestic activities in her work blended with flesh and enticing poses, Chanel Von Habsburg-Lothringen narrates her story as an abandoned child and her reality at home at that time. Wanting to say it all through the collages, the artist seems to install a distance between herself and the viewer. The mask and the wig are a way to progress incognito while she is telling her story.
The grandmother, used a symbol of death and mortality combined to a bright contrasted background blurs the lines of the artist’s intentions to reveal it all through her art. “creating photographs where it is unclear if the subject is reflecting on her own past, looking forward to the future, or trapped somewhere in between.”

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Rad, Dude: Michael Galinsky’s Photographs Captures Malls From the 80’s

Michael Galinsky - Photograph

Michael Galinsky - Photograph

Michael Galinsky - Photograph

Michael Galinsky - Photograph

Photographer Michael Galinsky’s series Malls Across America captures what we simultaneously love and hate about the mall. Stale air, artificial light, and swarms of teenagers are all captured in photographs from 1989. It was in the 1980’s and 1990’s that these places were at the height of popularity and a bastion of consumerism; Galinsky’s photos now is like digging up a time capsule.

Malls Across America began in the winter of 1989 at the Smith Haven Mall in Garden City Long Island. Galinsky travelled from North Carolina to South Dakota, Washington State and beyond photographing malls. We can look at this series as a source of amusement and anthropological study. There are ostentatious 80’s fashions (a lot of big hair) and the beginnings of 90’s grunge.

In many of these photographs, we are the voyeur. I get the feeling that Galinsky took these photographs on the sly, trying to be inconspicuous about it. He captures images through plants, behind people on escalators, and standing outside stores as women are conferring about clothing choices. Because Galinsky makes us both the voyeur and the viewer, I can’t help but feel a little bad for spying. But, considering all the 80’s movies that included mall hijinks, it feels oddly fitting.

These malls still exist, they are just dead. My hometown mall still looks eerily familiar to what’s in these photographs. If this series makes you feel nostalgic for your own mall, you can buy a book of Galinsky’s work. Aptly titled, Malls Across America, it was released this past summer. (Via It’s Nice That and Gizmodo)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

David Hornung

To S.P The woodlands, backyards and mountain fields David Hornung paints can feel like elegies for lost friends.  Conversely, much of the work is contagiously, imaginatively playful.  These paintings can be read in contradictory ways; simultaneously flat and deep, both graphic and luminous.  Hornung does this purposefully, because “picture making can be as paradoxical as life itself.”  The invented settings evoke “memory, the flow of time, and, for lack of a better phrase, the sheer enigma of existence.”  The light breaking on the horizon in “To S.P.” (above) is both beautiful and heartrendingly sad.  What does it say about us when a sunset begs to be personified?  You can see David’s work at Flowers Gallery in Chelsea from June 30 to July 31.

Currently Trending

18th Century Engravings By Antonio Basoli Feature Intriguing Towns Made Out Of Typography

alphabet alphabet2 alphabet3 alphabet4

Antonio Basoli was an Italian artist who lived between the 18th and 19th century, and was a man with a vision. He created this architectural alphabet engravings called Alfabeto Pittorico (Pictorial Alphabet). The images don’t just depict letters, but elaborate buildings that use letterforms as their structure. It includes every letter except for the j, because it doesn’t exist in the Italian alphabet. They called it i lunga and it’s written with an i.

Soft, monochromatic images are full of intricate details, and we’re able to see every brick of a building in addition to the billowing clouds in the background. With each letter, Basoli creates a different setting and mood. Some landscapes are tranquil and idyllic-looking, filled with lush vegetation. Others are war-torn, and we see giant cracks in the foundation of buildings. Whatever the occasion, each is its own story with a compelling narrative of men versus themselves and also versus nature. (Via Sploid)

Currently Trending

Become A Beautiful/Decay Contributor!

Attention Cult Of Decay! Do you know thousands of artists and designers who need to get some well deserve exposure? Do love writing about art and want an outlet? Do you want over a million monthly readers from around the world  reading and hanging on your every word? Do you want to join Beautiful/Decay in our quest for all things groundbreaking and creative? If so then send a few short writing samples or links as well as a cover letter about why you want to join the Beautiful/Decay blog contributor team to contactbd(at)beautifuldecay.com.

We are looking for smart writers and contributors in all corners of the globe who have their hands on the pulse of the contemporary art world and want to join our independent group of writers, critics, and art enthusiasts. Writers must be able to commit to a minimum of two or more articles per week. These positions are unfortunately unpaid but hey who needs money when you have the power of influence and press?

 

Currently Trending

Our Romance With Discarded Beds And Found Photographs

Louise O'Rourke - Photography Louise O'Rourke - Photography Louise O'Rourke - Photography

Louise O’Rourke’s photographs document not just the idea of rejected beds as a form of waste, but more so, the repetition of intimate objects made sadly public with age, which moves her work into a particularly lonesome study of humanity’s careless romance with things.

From Toy Story to the Velveteen Rabbit, children’s literature seems to capitalize on a similar theme that O’Rourke tugs at here: because our beloved objects don’t age gracefully– or even at all– they get thrown away and easily replaced. We don’t even need to see the newer model to know that it is there. It is always there: lingering. Waiting. The job of an object is to selfishly service us until we are done with it. These are the rules. In this sense, objects can never win. Caught in limbo, O’Rourke’s wayfarer beds transition onto the street, heart exposed, welcoming vagrants or rodents. A sad Dickens’ death. It is not a story of waste, but love. Wherever the new bed is, the old bed is not, and will never be again.

However, there is a sign of hope. O’Rourke also notes the value of reinventing old finds such as discarded photographs, of which she peels at the emulsion, saving the scraps, to create a new context and authorship of the image, one that is more ephemeral or abstract.

She states, “By removing the emulsion, I further remove the photograph from the event and even claim the moments that stand out to me. By physically altering the found image with no negative to reprint from, I create my own narrative from those previously captured stories.”

Perhaps, through art, there is life after love for objects.

Currently Trending

MINALE-MAEDA’s Inside Out Furniture And Lego Buffet

Minale-Maeda’s Inside Out Furniture series is designed specifically to be downloadable in order to reduce enviornmental issues related to transport, costs of stockkeeping, and explore collaborative design and distribution. The concept was to turn pieces inside out to make construction simple, while brackets and structural details become distinctive and attractive features. The connections are 3D printed to suit various sizes of wood, and the crafting is minimal requiring only cutting to length and drilling. Another interesting project by the collaborative duo is the Lego Buffet, a buffet table gorgeously made entirely out of you guessed it, Legos! See more images after the jump!

Currently Trending

Delta- From Graffiti To Architecture

It’s always interesting to see what graffiti writers do in the fine art world. Some keep rehashing the same work on canvas, losing all of the power that energized the work by having it in the streets. However some artists such as the legendary Dutch graffiti artist Delta take what they’ve learned through their years of painting letterforms and create amazing new works that re-imagine architecture, space, installation and painting. Wondering what Delta’s graffiti looked like back in the day? Click the read more button and check out the last image.

Currently Trending