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Ana Strumpf Redesigns Fashion Magazine Covers By Adding Eye-Popping Colors And Patterns

Ana Strumpf - Mixed MediaAna Strumpf - Mixed Media

Artist Ana Strumpf uses creative color schemes and patterns to redesign fashion magazine covers. In her series Recover, trend-setting magazine like Vogue and Vanity Fair are transformed into whimsical worlds with eye-popping patterns complete with quirky make-up added on to the models. Striking, beautiful women posing for the camera are given pink hair, rosy cheeks, and green eye shadow, turning them into silly, fun characters. The primary colors and simple shapes are reminiscent of childhood and dress up games. Although her clashing patterns and neon colors at first may remind you of doodles, they all somehow look amazing. The interesting color palettes Strumpf chooses to add work beautifully in their own unique way.

Strumpf is a jack of all trades in the arts, as she designs and fabricates chairs, couches, lamps, and pillows on top of being an interior designer. Based out of New York, the artist studied fashion design at the Fashion Institute of Technology, which accounts for her love of high fashion magazines! Her cover redesigns are funky enough to be album covers, with the models now radiating lines and shapes along with the occasional third eye. Her wild stripes and spots form fresh new designs that really look like they belong on the cover of a magazine, like they are the next big trend in fashion. (via Honestly WTF)

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Save the Polaroid with “Instant Gratification”

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Ahh, the polaroid- the quick flash, shake, peel and voila of the beloved instantaneous image-maker is the timeless trope of countless cheesy grins. In our simulacra-riddled copy of a meta-copy digital age, there is something sincere in an entirely unique and irreplacable analog copy of a photo. Sure, I have thousands of digital files amassed on my computer. But the photos that I cherish are mostly those small, square little guys called polaroids, or to use their proper name, Instant Land Photography. With polaroid’s impending death nearing, thankfully someone has taken a stand. ISM Community will be opening an entirely polaroid exhibition entitled “Instant Gratification” at Copro Gallery this Saturday, from 7 to 11pm. With hundreds of ceiling to floor polaroids, the exhibition creates awareness about this waning art form. Flyer and more polaroids after the jump!

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Alison Moritsugu Paints Forested Scenes On Logs That Romanticize And Lament Nature

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Alison Moritsugu is an artist based in Beacon, NY, who paints pieces of fallen trees with scenes of idealized nature. Her works recall the landscape paintings of the 18th and 19th centuries, particularly those of Albert Bierstadt and Frederic Edwin Church. Following the contours of the logs, she revisions their origins as trees, painting deep forests, still lakes, mountain waterfalls, and autumnal skies. The log paintings serve a dual function: first, to acknowledge and meditate on the beauty of nature, much like the artists of the Hudson River School did; second, to contrast this romanticism with the signs of its destruction—the dead wood on which the scenes appear.

“My work reveals how idealized images of the land shape our concept of the natural world—in essence, how our experiences are mediated by the mechanisms of art and culture,” Moritsugu writes in her artist’s statement (Source). Throughout history, artists have appropriated and interpreted nature, turning lush imagery into cultural symbols of peace, exploration, sublimity, and abundance. These were the types of stories that fostered an idea that nature was somehow separate from us, a land of fantasy that eventually grew to be exploited. Today, as Moritsugu points out, “photoshopped images of verdant forests and unspoiled beaches invite us to vacation and sightsee, providing a false sense of assurance that the wilderness will always exist” (Source). By producing a conflict between the serene imagery and the dead wood, Moritsugu faces us with our roles in the environment’s uncertain future.

Visit Moritsugu’s website to view more. (Via Design Faves)

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The Jarred Trees of Naoko Ito

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The sculptures of Naoko Ito are elegant in their simplicity.  Indeed, these pieces are entirely constructed of only two materials: a tree and jars.  A limb of a tree is cut into several segments and each segment, in turn, is placed in a jar.  Naoko carefully arranges the jarred pieces to reconstruct the shape of the limb.  A subdued commentary on the relationship between humans and nature, the imagery is immediate all the same.  Though the shape and size of the tree limb is intact, the jarred branches are nearly gloomy.

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The Lives Of Miniature Cement People By Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Isaac Cordal

Via Twisted Sifter: Isaac Cordal is a Spanish artist that has been working on his own projects since 1999. His ongoing series entitled Cement Eclipses began in art school in 2002 but he didn’t start placing them on the streets until 2006, with his first piece laid in the city of Vigo, Spain.

Cordal makes the tiny sculptures in his apartment/home studio. He has placed them in major cities all around Europe including: London, Amsterdam, Barcelona, Milan, Berlin and Brussels. “Small interventions in big cities,” is how Cordal characterized Cement Eclipses.

In a 2012 interview with Agenda Magazine, Cordal explains:

‘Our gaze is so strongly focused on beautiful, large things, whereas the city also contains zones that have the potential to be beautiful, or that were really beautiful in the past, which we overlook. I find it really interesting to go looking for those very places and via small-scale interventions to develop a different way of looking at our behaviour as a social mass.'”

Check out a previous post about Cordal’s strainer street art here.

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Become A Beautiful/Decay Contributor!

Do you know thousands of artists and designers who need to get some well deserve exposure? Do love writing about art and want an outlet? Do you want over a million monthly readers from around the world reading and hanging on your every word? Do you want to join Beautiful/Decay in our quest for all things groundbreaking and creative? If so then send three samples of your writing as well as a cover letter about why you want to join the Beautiful/Decay blog contributor team to contactbd(at)beautifuldecay.com.

Writers must be able to commit to a minimum of 1-2 posts per day during the week. This is a freelance paid position.

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Li Yu & Liu Bo

 

It’s been three years since the competition, but we felt like the artists and the work that was contributed deserve to be featured. The event, Meeting Place FotoFest Beijing 2006, was a joint effort by FotoFest International and Hewlett Packard China. The competition was an attempt to create new opportunities and provide a platform for contemporary Chinese photographers, and their work, to become available to the global presence of the art. The four day event proved to be an incredible learning experience for hundreds of people who came together in Beijing.

The two artists in this post are of 36 photographers who were selected by international reviewers as “some of the most interesting artist/photographers they encountered at the Meeting Place Beijing”. To see the rest, click through their website, where all 36 artists have mini portfolios!

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Jodi.org turns your Keyboard into a Sk8board then Tweets about it

Jodi.org (Joan Heemskerk and Dirk Paesmans) has always been the pioneers of the net art movement subverting websurfing logics and breaking your browsers since the mid ’90s and have been deconstructing web platforms such as Google Maps, Blogger, and now Twitter too has fallen victim. Taking place last Monday in the Netherlands, “Sk8monkey” involved a group of skaters using wheeled wireless keyboards instead of regular boards which were connected to a number of computers logged-on to a Twitter account, which was subsequently overloaded with nonsense “tweets”, made solely of random characters. Maybe these nonsensical keyboard mash sessions are actually more interesting than some users’ sensical ones, ha!

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