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Our Romance With Discarded Beds And Found Photographs

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Louise O’Rourke’s photographs document not just the idea of rejected beds as a form of waste, but more so, the repetition of intimate objects made sadly public with age, which moves her work into a particularly lonesome study of humanity’s careless romance with things.

From Toy Story to the Velveteen Rabbit, children’s literature seems to capitalize on a similar theme that O’Rourke tugs at here: because our beloved objects don’t age gracefully– or even at all– they get thrown away and easily replaced. We don’t even need to see the newer model to know that it is there. It is always there: lingering. Waiting. The job of an object is to selfishly service us until we are done with it. These are the rules. In this sense, objects can never win. Caught in limbo, O’Rourke’s wayfarer beds transition onto the street, heart exposed, welcoming vagrants or rodents. A sad Dickens’ death. It is not a story of waste, but love. Wherever the new bed is, the old bed is not, and will never be again.

However, there is a sign of hope. O’Rourke also notes the value of reinventing old finds such as discarded photographs, of which she peels at the emulsion, saving the scraps, to create a new context and authorship of the image, one that is more ephemeral or abstract.

She states, “By removing the emulsion, I further remove the photograph from the event and even claim the moments that stand out to me. By physically altering the found image with no negative to reprint from, I create my own narrative from those previously captured stories.”

Perhaps, through art, there is life after love for objects.

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The World Largest Calligraphy Graffiti Art Is Located On a Rooftop In Moscow

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What just happened last September 2015 in Moscow is massive. The largest calligraphy artwork was designed, filmed and executed by artist Pokras Lampas. Another masterpiece entering ‘Calligraffiti’. A movement blending calligraphy characters and wide paintings. 

730 liters (193 gallons) of white paint were needed to cover the 1625m2 (2000 yards) rooftop of an old chocolate factory in Moscow. Pokras Lampas and his team manufactured 4 big brooms of 1 meter long each that he used to ‘write’ on the floor. During 2 days, the artist designed and producer Sergey Valyaev filmed the experience. (See the video above) Alternatively showing the talent of Pokras Lampas, the huge surface he used a his canvas and the passion and wonder which transported the young artist. The whole team a.k.a. Smokin’ Heroes, risked the possible rain and the potential delay of the paint delivery coming from another city to achieve the colossal artwork. 

The entire surface of the rooftop is covered in calligraphy in concentric circles in a language ‘dedicated to the moments of inspiration and creativity’. The aesthetic and the style is close to artist Retna’s work which, at a smaller scale, also covers walls. The cursive letters and the urban locations used by artists who calligraphy create a modern approach to a traditional art. Behind the performance, there’s a desire to trigger visual excitement for the eyes.

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Paul Kooiker

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Photographer Paul Kooiker has a creepy little voyeuristic collection of work that is not only unnerving, but quite beautiful all at the same time. In this way, his work really stands out to me, it is observation perfected – maybe even surpasses to intrusive. This terrifying, and talented photographer doesn’t need gore to freak you out. He just needs the eerie-calm and the psychological imprint he leaves behind that has you suspicious of just who is standing behind you. I am going to have some weird dreams tonight…

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Claire Sloan

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Photographer Claire Sloan spent the last year documenting her life in a photographic journal, “the diary,” recording images of sleeping, meals, and the weather, so that each month stood out from the last. Be sure to check out her site and the rest of “the diary;” I love how she moves from black and white to stronger and stronger color as she transitions from the cold winter months into the summer.

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Gruesome, Hyperrealist Oil Paintings Of Hacked Up Body Parts By Fábio Magalhães

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For Brazilian artist Fábio Magalhães’ hyperrealist oil paintings, the more grotesque the better. Using gruesome body horror imagery such as hacked up, barely identifiable body parts and suffocated faces in plastic bags, Magalhães’ work is as incisive as it is skillfully rendered. The breaking down of recognizably human appendages and entrails into chopped up, stomach churning chunks is purposefully reminiscent of a real-life counterpart: that of animal cruelty. Although we’re accustomed to seeing animals deconstructed into bright, vacuum-sealed packages of meat every time we go to a supermarket, it’s only when faced with the sickening sight of what our own bodies would look like if sold in similar plastic bags that truth of the cruelty behind the meat industry becomes stunningly clear. Magalhães’ paintings are nightmarish in portrayal, and certainly something you’d never want to see in real life, but when put to canvas are strong, provocative, and memorable works. Magalhães studied at the Federal University of Bahia in the city of Salvador, where he is currently based. (via Illusion)

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Eric Cahan And The Science Of Light

 

Intrigued by the power and nostalgia of Nature, New York based artist Eric Cahan has been devoting his time to long journeys, willing to observe and study the behavior of sun light and its impact on earth.

Cahan´s main project “Sky Series” invites you to get absorbed by unique shots of the sunrise and sunset, enigmatic and mysterious pieces titled only by location and time. Each photography is a visual and spiritual souvenir that captures a magic hour, a perfect and harmonious glow of natural light.

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Making The Invisible Visible

This might be one of the most inventive works of advertising and street art that i’ve seen all year! Brothers and Sisters creative duo have teamed up with anonymous German street art collective Mentalgassi, to create art installations for Amnesty International. Called Making the Invisible Visible, the posters highlight the case of Troy Davis, a 42-year-old man who has been on death row for 19 years in the USA, despite serious doubts about his conviction.

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Laser-Cut Wooden Records

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These aren’t your typical vinyl records.  Actually, they’re not vinyl at all.  Amanda Ghassaei seems to have perfectly situated herself between being a scientist and artist.  This project illustrates that well.  For it Ghassaei uses a laser to burn grooves into a variety of materials such as wood, acrylic, and paper.  The grooves are about two times larger than they would be on a regular record.  However, these DIY records are still entirely playable.  Check out the video after the jump to see her laser-cut records in action.

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