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Michael Patterson-Carver

Michael Patterson-Carver’s drawings address political issues with a refreshing directness and dark sense of humor.

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Magazine Alteration Creates Haunting And Abstract Images

abstract images zarraluki21 abstract images

Guim Tió Zarraluki is a Spanish mixed media artist who creates work that transforms magazines into haunting and abstract images. Much of his work features portraits sourced from magazine advertisements. He alters the page with chemicals and oil pastels, transforming these “picture perfect” models into abstract, and sometimes unsettling, figures. His work maintains a photorealistic sensibility while containing something haunting and foreboding. If you look carefully, you’ll notice that the artist has left a small part of the magazine untouched or barely altered, leaving a trace of the original during his process. Tió also has a photography series of human figures with faces painted in a similar aesthetic, turning his form back in on itself to create abstracted figurative images. (via)

“The artist stages a controversial issue for contemporary society and his work becomes an exploration of the collective unconscious, which governs the aesthetic valences on all types of human monstrosities in the sign of narcissistic beauty emulation as the key to success; a parody of stereotypes that today govern the new conceptions of the meaning “human being”. (via)

You can watch him at work on a magazine page alteration here.

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Emma Howell’s Hand-Made Camera Prints Photographs Onto Glass

Emma Howell - Photography Emma Howell - PhotographyEmma Howell - PhotographyEmma Howell - Photography

In the age of digital photography and Instagram filters that make things look fakely old, glass artist and photographer Emma Howell uses a technique that is opposite of the easy, fast-paced methods popular today. Not only does she go to painstaking lengths to print an image, but she uses the unconventional surface of glass. Howell crafts hand-blown vessels and prints landscape images on them using the technique of the wet plate collodion – a photographic process that predates the Civil War. The result is a subtle and moody piece that’s a conversation between photography and form. She tells Wired Magazine, “Most people are not able to experience a place that is unaffected by the human presence. So I’m creating a way for others to experience this in a way that’s more than looking at a flat print of the cliché beach we all see and know.” The shape of the glass informs what the image is. A ripple or imperfection is meant to echo waves in the landscapes.

Howell’s pieces are irregularly shaped, so she had to build her own camera to accommodate them. She studied how large format cameras were constructed and sawed a barrel in half to act as the camera’s body. Afterwards, she fashioned a mount that allowed her to attach a traditional lens to the barrel. After six weeks of trial and error, she had a working design and began shooting.

The process of transferring an image to glass is very involved. Howell hikes to remote areas with a miniature chemistry lab and darkroom in tow, working on the fly to mix up photosensitive chemicals, coat glass, expose shots, and develop the image – all in the span of 15 minutes.(Via Wired)

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Rocks And Crystals As Inspiration For Carly Waito And Three Other Artists

Amy Brener

Amy Brener

Carly Waito

Carly Waito

Jonathan Latiano

Jonathan Latiano

Debra Baxter, You have to believe we are magic, (barf bag)

Debra Baxter, You have to believe we are magic, (barf bag)

These four artists are interested in exploring nature through crystals, minerals and natural stones.  Toronto-based Carly Waito makes small oil paintings (about 5×6 inches) of crystals and minerals.  Inspired by the natural world Waito is interested in geology, geometry and light.  With a sense of wonder and curiosity, Waito explores via paint tiny mineral specimens, revealing the beauty and magic nature is capable of creating.

Seattle-based Debra Baxter uses stones and minerals, and their contrasts or relationships to investigate human interactions.  To address notions such as human power plays, vulnerability and gender differences, Baxter plays titles like You have to believe we are magic (barf bag), 2010 off visual displays of ceramic, minerals and reflective acrylic.  Her sculptures become small visual metaphors replete with symbols and juxtapositions that form ideas and narrative.

Amy Brener works by layering resin, glass and Fresnel lens to create light sensitive sculptures that resemble large crystals or minerals.  Brener’s process involves mixing and pouring pigmented resin into wooden frameworks.  Only able to control certain aspects of the process, Brener embraces the surprises that happen along the way.  The process gives her sculptures a quality that exists between the geological and the man-made.

Jonathan Latiano’s Points of Contention, 2011, was an installation at School 33 Art Center in Baltimore.  The piece was made out of plastics, resins and polymers and appeared to be exploding out of the floor.  Meant to address the effects the sculpture’s materials have on the geological landscape, Latiano’s work is a visual reminder of our impact on nature.

 

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Hong Chun Zhang

hongchunzhang_11

I have always enjoyed Kansas-based Chinese artist Hong Chun Zhang’s work, as I am also obsessed with hair. But her recent series of non-representational portraiture between Hong Chun Zhang and her twin sister is what I believe to be her best work so far. Charcoal drawings on long paper scrolls to accentuate the length and feel of their most noticeable characteristic.

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Masaya Kushino Designs Chimerical High Heels With Animal Parts

Masaya Kushino - Design

Masaya Kushino - Design

Masaya Kushino - Design

Masaya Kushino - Design

Masaya Kushino‘s high heel  designs are chimerical, fusing organic textures and materials with the manmade. He utilizes luxurious fur and lush jungle moss alongside meticulously stitched leather, creating works of art that are quirky and beautifully imaginative.

It’s fitting that the form he chooses to play with is the high heel: the height of artifice; impractical; undeniably evocative. It’s a choice that is brimming with meaning and possible interpretations. They’re an everyday item but commonly elevated by haute couture into something fantastical. To some people, they represent an unobtainable ideal, one that is rife with sociopolitical meaning and controversy. Whether you approve of the existence of stilettos or not, they’re admittedly architectural, intriguing in their contours and elegant curves.

Kushino emphasizes a number of these qualities, borrowing the jeweled swoop of a peacock’s tail feather and a bouquet of flowers to highlight the theatricality. In his latest work, called “Bird-Witched,” he incorporates an element of the grotesque: Three shoes that seem each an embryonic stage in the development of a chicken. The heel of the shoe is a gnarled claw, sharp-toed and grisly.

“Bird-Witched” can be seen at the Kyoto National Museum of Modern Art but will soon be making an appearance at the Brooklyn Museum, which is currently exhibiting “Killer Heels,” a retrospective of the last 4 centuries of iconic shoes. (h/t Spoon & Tamago)

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Bagrad Badalian’s Long-Exposure Photography Manipulates Light Into Hypnotic Scenes Of Distorted Figures

Bagrad Badalian - Digital Photograph

Bagrad Badalian - Digital Photograph

Bagrad Badalian - Digital Photograph

Berlin based photographer Bagrad Badalian uses the technique of long-exposure photography to bend and manipulate light in his energetic and magnetic photography. The motion in his photography combined with a long exposure elongates his subjects and drags colored lights across the composition. Badalian, mainly focusing on the human form as his subject, allows the figure to be taken over by hypnotic, multicolored light sources that bounce and bend across the figures. This element along with his carefully cropped compositions render many of the subjects unrecognizable, shifting the focus onto the many waves of light. Each color seems to be exploding from the bodies with an energetic force, creating a vibrant pulse felt by the viewer. As you look at each figure in motion, you can feel the pulsating rhythm that encompasses each photograph.

“The photographic technique interests me for the many possibilities it offers not only to scientists but also artists. Long exposure photography is on of those techniques that fascinate me since I have started practicing photography. It allows me to decompose the movement of time and control the aesthetic and imaginative potential of chance.”

Each figure’s identity is skewed as their features are distorted and manipulated by the long exposure. This creates a beautiful, but sometimes nightmarish, effect. The colored lights dance across the figure’s faces due to the movement in the photograph, which also causes the face to shift. It becomes disfigured as the movement t manipulates the face and body like a ball of clay. Although causing a face-altering effect, Badalian’s technique is overall unique, holding a strong and powerful force.

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Baptiste Alchourroun

Really great work by French animator and illustrator Baptiste Alchourroun. The video uses choppy motion and what seems like a loooot of neon/brightly colored paper to create a really cool effect. The music is pretty catchy too and the character in it reminds me of the dude from MSTRKRFT because of his ‘stache (insert ‘stache n shades competition plug). Check out more of Baptiste’s illustration work after the jump & definitely check out his website because it’s all bitmap-y and cute.

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