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Julia Fox Exposes An Intimate Portrait Of Brutal Love In Her Autobiographical Art Book

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Julia Fox, artist and head designer of Franziska Fox, recently released a graphic, autobiographical art book titled Heartburn/Nausea. The book acts as a character sketch, exposing flashes of intimate details that add up to mold a vision of a troubled girl. There is no hesitation between honesty and story telling, as this book is a collection of literal documents from the artist’s life. The book is extremely raw and almost devastatingly personal. She invites us into her own past, for just a moment, allowing us to truly have an experience through her memories.

RH: The book is autobiographical, extremely graphic and exposes probably the most intimate moments of your life. What made you want to share these moments?

JF: I believe that when you share something with someone it is no longer yours. I was tired of carrying it so I gave it away.

RH: Do you feel like the book falls under confession, warning, or exposé? Or perhaps, none of those. Maybe its something entirely different.

JF: I don’t know… It’s just a picture book of artifacts and stuff I have collected over the years. I’m not sure what the message behind it is. I guess since my life is so different now and I’m somewhat successful and happy, the message is that it’s ok to be fucked up. It’s ok to have a past.

And more importantly it’s ok to show your vulnerability and your weaknesses. And if you are fucked up and able to use it to your advantage, you are probably more interesting and insightful than most. So just like don’t be ashamed of yourself.

RH: Does the work aim to address mental illness at all?

JF: I think indirectly it does. I am bipolar. I think being untreated as an adolescent had a huge impact on my life. I’m very impulsive. I do what I want, when I want and when I want something, I want it now. I live in the moment and never take into consideration the consequences. I’m more or less still the same, the only difference is that the things I want have changed.

RH: It seems the book touches upon the borders between love, intimacy and obsession. Can you talk, just briefly, about these relationships at all. Do you believe healthy love, or love in of itself, exists?

JF: I do believe in healthy love. I just think it’s boring. To be completely honest, I have such a good time on my own that for me to want to be with someone else it better be one hell of a ride. I better feel everything and I better feel pain and in turn learn something new. Otherwise I’m ok being with just me. I’m a good time, in my opinion. 

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Danse Dance

Everyone loves a good behind the scene video that gives you a sneak peak into the artists creative process. The above video showcases the tedious process of stop motion. the means are simple but the final product is a lo-fi meets high concept video could have been made by a big budget studio. More info about the project after the jump!

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Adam Sorensen’s Glowing Landscape Paintings

Adam Sorensen lives and works in Portland. His barren landscapes are litered with glowing mounds and vibrant streams set against dynamic skies. In his own words: “Landscape painting affords me a wealth of tradition and influence, and provides a platform that seems familiar and recognizable. 19th century romanticism, Japanese woodblock prints, and Abstract expressionism all factor into my works vocabulary. I work primarily in a reactive sense. A certain rock may lead to another, which in turn may lead to a specific tree. The scenes I end up composing, function as both utopian and eerily post-apocalyptic. Both of which can be seen metaphorically as social concerns in contemporary life. By inviting the viewer in visually, I ask them to recall where we have been, explore where we are now, and confront where we may be headed.”

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Travis Somerville Explores Past And Present Racism In America

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In his paintings and installations, Georgia-born artist Travis Somerville references the inherent history of racism toward black individuals in Southern politics and culture. With motifs spanning Jim Crow to the Ku Klux Klan and Abraham Lincoln to Martin Luther King Jr., Somerville tackles a wide range of race relations in American history. While most of the themes and narratives of the sculptures—which are often made of wood and typically feature drawn or painted portraits—are rooted heavily in the past, Somerville, a white male, uses historical relics and bygone references to challenge his audiences and invite them to question America’s current state.

In light of recent instances of race-related controversy in the news—namely, the murder of Michael Brown by police officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri—the commentary presented through Somerville’s sculptures has become increasingly prevalent. Brown, a black teenager, was shot and killed by the white officer while unarmed, and his death has sparked civilian outrage and unrest both locally and throughout the country. While the depravity of racial profiling and its potentially fatal consequences has dominated the news since Brown’s death in August, Somerville addressed its historical reality three years prior, with Ballad of George Stinney 2011.  

Comprised of two classroom chairs featuring a graphite portrait, tied together with rope, and hanging suggestively from the ceiling, the piece references the tragic tale of George Stinney, a fourteen-year old African American boy executed in 1944. Killed for a crime against a white individual for which, after his death, he was eventually deemed innocent, he remains an example of the systemic racism present in America.

Ultimately, while killed exactly seventy years prior to Brown and still unknown to many, Stinney, through Somerville’s art, is presented to the public as a reminder of America’s prejudice past—and, unfortunately, as a reflection of its present, too.

Be sure to check out his work at Senator Corey Booker‘s office in Newark, New Jersey for a group exhibition featuring Kara Walker and Mickalene Thomas (January 2015), at ARCOmadrid (February 2015), and at a solo booth at VOLTA NY (March 2015).

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Lina Hsaio’s Bizarre Moss And Lichen Covered Floral Portraits

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Sculptures made out of moss and lichen. The organic foam that grows on rocks and trees and that are usually considered repellant. Lina Hsaio uses these unwanted and rejected elements to create fantasy faces. Whether painted or textured, the portraits depicted by the artist seem to always be comprised of flora.

The face shapes are perfectly balanced. The major features appear distinctly; nose, mouth and cheeks. It almost seems like the plants grew directly onto the human faces. The fuzzy components were perhaps not chosen coincidently by Lina Hsaio. Moss and lichen are different in their form of life. One is a plant, breathing and living; the other is a composite organism but not a plant. Intertwined together, they symbolize life and death.

The purpose of Lina Hsaio is to question the human condition. According to her work,  it’s all being summarized in the green, bushy portraits. Behind each individuals is hidden a force stronger than themselves.“Lina’s series of mixed media portraits displaying erratic forms of the human condition with elements that are not to be confined to universals symbols”

Lina Hsaio’s work will be displayed at the Image Gallery in NYC until November 6th 2015. (Via The Creators Project).

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Color Shifting Art Uses RGB Lights To Change Scenes

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Italian based artist team, Carnovsky, unveiled their RGB Fabulous Landscapes during Milan Design Week 2013. Their digital fresco’s were printed using an innovative technique by Italian company graphicreport. In plain light the landscapes, figures, architecture and atmospheres vibrate and the images are tangled with one another.

But when red, blue or green light is applied to the digital fresco’s a whole different series of pictures emerge. In the piece Atmospheric N. 1 the sky seems to be in a flux of sunrise, sunset and storm as the lighting changes.

In Landscape N.1 a room that seems to go back into infinity is taken over by a lush green landscape which then gives way to a centuries old battle scene.

Both the technique and the imagery are compelling and together the juxtaposition creates an ethereal and haunting effect. (via)

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Interview: Eric Yahnker

  

Eric Yahnker creates works that are too clever for their own good. He welcomes all sectors of popular culture, personal narrative, religion, icon and beyond into his studio as “fair game” for his visual fodder. At times, the works playfully traverse into taboo subjects and ideologies, like a naughty child sticking their finger into the socket or cookie jar, at once turning them on their head once again to reveal their inherent paradoxes and inconsistencies.  

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Words Leap Off The Page In 3D Calligraphy Art By Tolga Girgin

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Considerably ancient art form of calligraphy is brought to new dimensions by Tolga Girgin, a Turkish electrical engineer by trade and graphic designer by heart. His series of 3D calligraphic artworks witness how a little bit of imagination and skill can breathe life to a slowly disappearing craft.

Looking at Girgin’s graceful letters and strokes it seems like they are going to leap off the page and float into thin air. The eye-catching effect is achieved by combining skillful shading and perspective. Bright colors also do justice for Girgin’s works. His letterforms look more like paper cut-outs than two-dimensional drawings.

Girgin also practices “calligraffiti” which blends the properties of calligraphic style with modern day graffiti: the art of writing meets the art of getting your (pseudo) name up in an urban environment. Calligraffiti borrows inspiration from ancient lettering styles: Japanese ancient brush characters, Arabic pictorial scripts, medieval books and quill writing. The new form of art was originally named and pioneered by Dutch artist Niels Shoe Meulman. (via Colossal)

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