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Pantone Colors, Typography And Pop Culture Collide In Panto’ N’ Roll

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Chic & Artistic is a Paris based multi-disciplined creative studio working in a wide array of mediums and styles. Their Panto’ N’ Roll series caught my eye and immediately made me chuckle. Mixing pop culture references, typography and Pantone color chips, they have created a humorous word/image association game for all of us to enjoy. (via)

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Peat Duggins

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Watercolor, gouache and ink paintings by once Austin, TX now Cambridge, MA artist Peat Duggins.  The detail images are telling of a cartoon-apocalypse and I have to say I’m not a morbid or pessimistic person, however I enjoy dooms-day movies and I’m growing fond on such themes in artwork where humans are gone and nature takes over.  This is different though, it’s sweet.

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LEGO Cello

Yes this is a tad cheesy but I have a soft spot for anything LEGO related, especially if it’s a life size, actually working cello!

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Santtu Mustonen

Santtu Mustonen

 

Coming to us from Finland, Santtu Mustonen brings together illustration and animation in a wonderfully bizarre manner. We at B/D are totally digging his “slightly moving illustrations”!

 

P.S. The second animation after the jump isn’t working properly (it had to be resized), so be sure to check out his website!

 

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Donald Dixon

Donald Dixon’s illustrations are hilarious! His style looks really Japanese to me, maybe its because some of his characters look like Astro Boy. Kind of reminds me of a summer time a couple years ago when my friend and I, both girls, wanted to act and dress like little boys…ah…youth!  The shape of the eyes and expressions also remind me of Helen Jo’s comics.

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Rena Littleson’s The Truth About Drugs

 

It’s funny how “facts” “evidence” and “reality” have a way of changing over time. How do they decide where the line between legal and illegal lies? Sometimes it’s anyone’s guess. Though probably money related. Rena Littleson’s The Truth About Drugs series of graphic illustrations explores these topics and more after the jump.

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B/D at Renegade Craft Fair this Weekend!

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This weekend, hundreds of artists will paint their faces and hawk their handmade wares in a cornfield. What is this, a Woodstock documentary? No! It’s the Los Angeles Renegade Craft Fair! Please come visit the B/D booth, we will be selling special surprises such as limited edition shirts, never-before-seen samples, magazines and more, all at a discount!

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Sculptor Adrian Arleo’s Mystical Hybrids Foretell Change And Resist Loss In The Natural World

Adrian Arleo - Sculpture

“Branched Lives” (2008). Clay, glaze, wax encaustic, 11.5 x 13 x 6″.

Adrian Arleo - Sculpture

“Two Bas, Console and Consort” (2007). Clay, glaze, wax encaustic, approx. 23 x 32 x 9″ each.

Adrian Arleo - Sculpture

“Lion, Awareness Series” (2011). Clay, glaze, gold leaf, 20 x 27 x 12″.

Adrian Arleo - Sculpture

“The Dreamer Awakes” (2007). Clay, glaze, wax encaustic, 12.5 x 18 x 13″.

Adrian Arleo is a sculptor living near Missoula, Montana whose ceramic works hybridize the human figure with animal and environmental imagery. Among her creations are bodies pock-marked with honeycomb formations, people birthed from wasp nests, and animals whose skin ripple with human eyes. While there is a sadness and mystical darkness in some of her sculptures — the “Swallow Bust” hybrid, for example, seems suspended between life and death as birds inhabit her hollowed body — they also exhibit agelessness and awareness. Part of this can be attributed to the classical style of the sculptures, which is reminiscent of ancient Greek and Italian art. As Arleo writes on her About page: “By focussing on older, more mysterious ways of seeing the world, edges of consciousness and deeper levels of awareness suggest themselves” (Source).

Thematically, however, Arleo’s works draw their strength and knowledge from the cycles intrinsic to the natural world. As she explained in a 2012 chat with Ceramic Arts Daily:

“[M]y ideas come mainly through observation and curiosity, taking note of what’s around me: wasp nests, bird tracks in snow, the eyes in aspen tree bark, the limbs of trees, deer grazing in the fields, all these things are analogous to our own experiences with life cycles of birth and growth, reproduction and nurturing impulses, defense mechanisms, aging, death, decay. […] With the changing state of the world, I feel a greater and greater urgency to remember and express how we are all connected, all dependent on the same air, water, soil.” (Source).

As hybrids, the sculptures’ awareness of life, death, and the interconnectedness of all things is fused into their bodies. There is no distinction between what is solely “human” and “animal”; all worlds are represented in one. They remind us of our own material connections to the natural world, and how — through their sad, ancient expressions — the world is changing.

Not all of Arleo’s creations foretell this change passively, however. She expresses how her newer works are quietly unwilling to be reduced to extinction:

“[W]hen I finished this most recent body of work and looked for a feeling that encompassed it as a whole, I was struck by the concept of a harbinger: a dream, sign, or omen foreshadowing things to come. There is a quiet resistance, in this work, to the cultural and biological losses of our time” (Source).

In this way, we can read the sculptures as defiant, with their bodily hybridity signifying a memory of and connection to the natural world that will never be completely wiped away.

Visit Arleo’s website to view more of her work. You can read the rest of the article on Ceramic Arts Daily here. (Via I Need A Guide)

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