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Odires Mlászho’s Book Sculptures Re-Bound With Interweaved Pages

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The works São Paulo-based Odires Mlászho hinge on transformations, often employing books, found images, tape, paste and collage. The Brazilian artist’s name is even a work of transmutation. Born José Odires Micowski, Mlászho created his artist pseudonym by borrowing from and combining the names of his two great influences, Max Ernst and László Moholy-Nagy. In a description taken from an insightful studio visit with Goethe-Institut, the following is perhaps the best description of the artist’s working process. In Odires Mlászho’s work, objects are photos, texts are images, books are sculptures: nothing occupies its original place in the world. With his work the artist proves that things are not such as defined in the way we tend to believe and that after destruction objects can be re-created and reused in a total different way. His work offers us the possibility of entering a world with a completely new kind of perception: it is our world, all the original elements are there, but this world is truly and deeply transformed.

For works which Mlászho debuted earlier this summer at ‘Inside/Outside’ at the Venice Art Biennale 2013, he weaved individual pages of books until they were connected and bound in an entirely new way. Created with fellow Brazilian artist, Hélio Fervenza, the book sculptures rely on an intricate twisting of possibilities which are visually engrossing and immediately approachable, a difficult feat considering the complex theories behind the work.

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Antony Gormley

Antony Gormley

Via large-scale installations, Antony Gormley explores relationships with nature in a radical investigation of the body as a place of memory and transformation. His recent work increasingly engages with energy systems, fields and vectors, rather than mass and defined volume, evident in works like CLEARING, BLIND LIGHT, FIRMAMENT and ANOTHER SINGULARITY.

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Paul Blow

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I love Paul Blow‘s witty and pithy illustrations (such as this obviously confused cat). His sense of humor relays a story without trying too hard. His illustrations have appeared in the likes of Business Week and the Boston Globe, giving him the opportunity to play around with popular culture and politics.

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Bryan Olson’s Sci-Fi Collages

Bryan Olson lives and works in North Carolina. He combines vintage imagery to form an ongoing science fiction themed narrative. Many sci-fi elements are prevalent; portals, UFOs, analytical graphs, and celestial bodies are common in his work.The  collages represent our never ending fascination with the unknown and the search for our place in the Universe.(via)

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Brony Is The New Black

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In a world where there are fanatic fans of all things it should be no surprise that somewhere there is a large group of adults that are fanatical My Little Pony fans who convene once a year to celebrate all things “Brony” (a term used to describe themselves). Amy Lombard recently visited the yearly celebration called Bronycon to document the festivities for New York Magazine. You might think that Bronies are primarily females who are reliving their teenage years but much to our surprise most Bronies are adult males. I have to say that this takes the creep factor up a notch knowing that at least once a year hundreds of grown men cover themselves in glitter and fake horns and gallop around in a convention hall for several days straight.  Is this an innocent geeky infatuation or a bunch of covert furries masquerading as My Little Pony fans? (via)

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Petros Chrisostomou’s Photographs Trick Your Sense Of Scale

Chrisostomou, Photography

Chrisostomou, Photography

Chrisostomou, Photography

Petros Chrisostomou, a New York based photographer, plays with scale, mass-produced and ephemeral objects, and hand-crafted mini architectural models in order to challenge the viewer’s visual certainties, and visual signifiers of contemporary mass culture.

The multi-faceted works resemble lively assemblages of what seem to be large-scaled mundane objects in exaggerated interiors – some resembling wreckage, and others referencing the extravagance of a Rococo palace.

Christosomou’s photographs become the field for mixing the high- and the low-brow, mass culture and genre painting, the luxurious and the expendable, as indications of social class distinctions. At the same time, the relations between the real and the imaginary in his oeuvre are a commentary on the mediated images of contemporary mass media that distort the natural and immediate dimension of our relation to reality, determining, among other things, the conditions for viewing and receiving art. 

The relevance of this body of work does not completely rely on its technical complexities, and cultural commentary, but also in its visual power. We know that the artist is not fabricating monumental sculptures resembling stiletto shoes, instead he is fabricating small-scaled architectural spaces- that play out with the objects, making them look bigger than they seem. It is important to notice, as curator Tina Pandi points out that “the alteration of scale and reversal of the relation between object and environment, between imaginary and real space.”

(Photos via Ignat Quotes via Artist’s Website)

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Konst & Teknik/ Trace a Face with Jonathan Puckey

“13 fellow artist and designers—1:2:3, Europa, Fageta, Florian Ludwig, Harm van den Dorpel, Kristina Brusa, Laurenz Brunner, Martijn Hendriks, Martin Ström, NODE Berlin Oslo, Ola Persson, Stefan Narancic and Åbäke—were asked to trace a face using the Delaunay Raster, a custom-written image vectorization tool for Adobe Illustrator.

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Akihiko Miyoshi’s Elegantly Simple Abstract Photographs

Artist Akihiko Miyoshi creates amazing abstract work using simple photographic technique.  He uses little more than a camera, colored tape, and a mirror to explore ideas of composition and color.  While photography is arguably thought of as the epitome of representational art, Akihiko’s images are decidedly abstract.  While minimally manipulating his images, they stand distinct from painting counterparts.  In a way Akihiko abstracts not only form, but light.

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