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Odires Mlászho’s Book Sculptures Re-Bound With Interweaved Pages

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The works São Paulo-based Odires Mlászho hinge on transformations, often employing books, found images, tape, paste and collage. The Brazilian artist’s name is even a work of transmutation. Born José Odires Micowski, Mlászho created his artist pseudonym by borrowing from and combining the names of his two great influences, Max Ernst and László Moholy-Nagy. In a description taken from an insightful studio visit with Goethe-Institut, the following is perhaps the best description of the artist’s working process. In Odires Mlászho’s work, objects are photos, texts are images, books are sculptures: nothing occupies its original place in the world. With his work the artist proves that things are not such as defined in the way we tend to believe and that after destruction objects can be re-created and reused in a total different way. His work offers us the possibility of entering a world with a completely new kind of perception: it is our world, all the original elements are there, but this world is truly and deeply transformed.

For works which Mlászho debuted earlier this summer at ‘Inside/Outside’ at the Venice Art Biennale 2013, he weaved individual pages of books until they were connected and bound in an entirely new way. Created with fellow Brazilian artist, Hélio Fervenza, the book sculptures rely on an intricate twisting of possibilities which are visually engrossing and immediately approachable, a difficult feat considering the complex theories behind the work.

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Artwork Of The Day: Explosion A

Lets start the weekend with a bang courtesy of photographer Christian Weber.

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Black And White Illustrations Of Imaginary Environments Transformed Into Sculptures

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Artist and illustrator Kevin LCK seems to stick to illustrating, even when crafting work in three dimensions.  Like his illustrative work, the sculptures are in spare black and white and made using paper. His Object series consists of a number of electronic appliances, such as a computer, microwave oven, and a television set.  Inside each appliance is a carefully crafted home setting.  Explaining the thought behind the series Kevin says:

 

“I seeked to detach the audience from the real world temporarily, provide them with a space to rethink and reconsider the way we behave and think about the relationship between ourselves, objects and environment with technology in a more conscious way.”

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Lady Lamb The Beekeeper’s Debut Studio Album, Ripley Pine

Lady Lamb The Beekeeper performing at the Bootleg Bar in Los Angeles, June 15, 2013.

Lady Lamb The Beekeeper aka Aly Spaltro recently released her debut studio album, Ripley Pine on Ba Da Bing Records. I was able to catch her solo performance the other night at the Bootleg Bar in Los Angeles and was blown away by her songs and incredible voice. At only 23, she has the stage presence of a seasoned pro starting her set singing acapella with an un-released song called, “Up in the Rafters”. Other stand out songs from the set included, “Between Two Trees” from her digital album, Mammoth Swoon, as well as the fantastic, “Aubergine” and “The Nothing Part II” from her new record. “I refuse to come back out here without a band” said Aly before performing her final song, “Crane Your Neck”.

Lady Lamb is currently on a co-headlining tour with Torres and will soon be supporting Thao & The Get Down Stay Down through August. You can check her out this coming Sunday, June 23rd at the Hi-Dive in Denver as well as in Chicago at the Empty Bottle on June 27th. You can listen to her many digital albums here as well as purchase her new record here. Check out her new video for, “The Nothing Part II, and be sure to keep an eye on this talented young singer/songwriter.

 

 

 

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Birgit Dieker

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There is a place between here and there that exists, but doesn’t prefer being pointed to on a map; that is where Birgit Dieker exists. Each piece talks about humans and their well-being, while telling us that none of this is real. The world is falling apart, and, because of Dieker’s work, we understand the value of the crumbs and sheddings.

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German Shible

Latin American artist German Selim Shible‘s illustrations.

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Kathryn Andrews: High Art Meets The Readymade

Kathryn Andrews

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Kathryn Andrews explores issues relating to performance, presentation and material.  Juxtaposing the legacies of pop art and minimalism, Andrews’ works direct a viewer to consider the way subjectivity is constructed in contemporary culture.  In the process, Andrews’ works manage to subvert the very art historical categories they reference.  Using fabricated forms alongside readymade objects sourced from the likes of prop shops, memorabilia stores or party supply outlets Andrews’ pieces become a powerful contrast between high art and pseudo-kitsch—shiny, serious mirrored surfaces reflect colorful, strange yet common objects.  In the reflection the viewer sees himself, thus becoming part of the narrative and generation of information and understanding.

Entertaining similar interests in her two-person exhibition with fellow Los Angeles artist, Alex Israel, at Gagosian in Rome, Andrews and Israel present works that explore a dialogue about specifically the readymade.  The show is up through March 14 and you can see images here.

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Jason Rhoades Amazingly Intricate Neon Installations

Jason Rhoades - installation

Jason Rhoades - installation

Jason Rhoades - installation

Jason Rhoades, who lived and worked in Los Angeles up until his death in 2006, created amazing, over-the-top, often overwhelming, generally disorienting installations.  Using neon, plastic buckets, power tools, snaking wires, figurines, sound and other odds and ends Rhoades created work that is engaging, witty and visually spectacular.

Known as “scatter art,” Rhoades’ environments combine a multiplicity of ideas.  In works like The Creation Myth, originally installed in 1998, and now re-created for his retrospective at the ICA in Philadelphia, Rhoades created sculptural forms representing how humanity processes information, forms memories and produces things like art.  The work often contains biographical, sexual and sometimes outright vulgar elements that require a viewer’s patience and open-mindedness.  Seemingly arbitrary, each artifact has its purpose within Rhoades’ installations.

Overloading a viewer with information and visual content replete with metaphors and symbols, Rhoades purposefully creates his installations to avoid finite conclusions.  In many ways Rhoades’ works mirror human thought—they layer information and content in seemingly incoherent ways forming multiple, usually incomplete notions and assumptions.

Rhoades’ retrospective will be on view at the Philadelphia ICA through December 29.

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