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Toru Izumida Creates Digital Collages With Computer Screenshots

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Screen Shot 2014-08-30 at 11.35.13 PM

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Screen Shot 2014-08-30 at 11.51.50 PM

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Screen Shot 2014-08-31 at 12.07.11 AM

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Screen Shot 2014-08-31 at 12.17.04 AM

A screenshot, or screen capture, is a tool that’s existed on computers for a very long time, and it’s an easily accessible modern-day archival method. In just a split second, we can take a snapshot of our desktop or movie screen and save it later use. For Japanese artist Toru Izumida, this simple process is used to create collage-esque artwork.

“I use selections of online media to create unexpected combinations that are finalized into a single screenshot,” says Izumida. “The exact date and signature of the creation is recorded on every work.” We see multiple screens open and contain pictures of textures, people, landscapes, and more. Izumida arranges them, varying the window size before capturing the final product on his Mac. The fractured layouts are then turned into prints, and elevates the ubiquitous tool into the realm of fine art.   (Via Spoon and Tamago)

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Greg Hopkins Update

We posted Greg Hopkins work back in 2009 when he was painting heavily detailed floral patterned paintings. Recently I visited Greg’s site and was pleasantly surprised by the new exciting direction for his work. The flowers have been replaced by tightly painted geometric patterns weaving in, out, and into faux paint drips.

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Pomme Chan

Experimental typography, playful illustrations, and a nice mix of hand drawn and digital wizardry by Pomme Chan.

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Alex Varanese- Bent Curcuit Type

Alex Varanese illustration

Typographer and illustrator Alex Varanese combines 3d techniques with traditional print design techniques in circuit bent type series of illustrations. I like the consistent and specific use of red in all of Alex’s work. Im not sure what you would call the shade but it’s an iconic palate that’s modern and vintage at the same time.  Alex also has a nice array of custom type on his site. More images after the jump.

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C. Owen’s Stunning Portraits Of Taxidermied Animals

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C. Owen Lavoie’s (better know as C. Owen) series of photographs entitled Trophies captures the emergence of exotic creatures out of darkness. Because they are shrouded in so much darkness, these portraits at first seem to be taken in close proximity to live animals, but Lavoie is able to get so close to these beasts because they are taxidermied. This creates a haunting and mysterious effect that reflects on ideas about preservation, death, and hunting. The lens captures the preserved expressions of the creatures’ vulnerability, creating a sort of double preservation of the dead animal that stares right back at us. Lavoie says that she considers the series “a way of bringing the animals back to life for the public eye. It’s sort of like a third generation; first the animal was born, then hunted and handed over to a taxidermist so it can be displayed and finally in the end, modified by my lens.”

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Gabi Trinkaus

Decontruct. Reconstruct. Gabi Trinkaus’ collages make for portraits that, at a distance, look like paintings of gorgeous people. On closer inspection, they bring details of chopped up textures, words, and logos.

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Ronit Bigal’s Covers The Body With Biblical Calligraphy

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ronit bigal

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Israeli artist Ronit Bigal transforms the body into a text. For her “Body Scripture II” series, Bigal uses digital photography overlaid with Biblical text (in Hebrew) and floral ornamentation drawn with black Indian ink to create these stunning images of body calligraphy. The body is exposed and abstracted, the text contouring bodily landscapes and capturing hidden textures and unspoken eroticism. Upon close inspection, the text on the bodies is hard to read. It’s small and intricate, but the overall effect creates a visually hypnotic pattern. Bigal places the text so thoughtfully around the curves of the body that it is hard to believe the text was not drawn directly onto the subjects. Her work also leaves me curious about which passages she placed on particular body parts, and if she was deliberate in the placement.

Her Saatchi profile explains that these images “…are almost abstract and enigmatic, arousing the viewer’s curiosity to discover what are the photographed objects, what meanings lies behind the texts; and whether there is a thematic affinity between them or, perhaps are the associations purely aesthetical?” (via my modern met)

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André da Loba’s Cardboard Sculptures

André da Loba was born in 1979 in Portugal, to a mama and a centaur. In a family of nine brothers he was the ugliest. His nose was very big, and still is. As a result, his parents sent him to join a sea circus”.  His work has been published in a myriad of publications including the New York Times, Time Magazine, The New Yorker, Newsweek, and the Washington Post. “Currently he lives in New York City, where he is secretly happy”.

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