Get Social:

B/D Apparel Artist Interview: Jiro Bevis

Jiro Bevis

To celebrate the release of B/D Apparel’s new Spring collection, we are featuring a 5-part interview series, giving you a behind-the-scenes look at each of the artists who create our graphics. Within these interviews, we explore their creative process, tools of the trade, influences, and their advice for fellow creatives.

For the first interview in the series, we caught up with Jiro Bevis, who collaborated with us to create “B/D Breakfast Club” and “Thumbs Up”. Jiro’s work interweaves iconic pop cultural references and inside jokes alike, resulting in a bold mix of idiosyncratic images, united by Bevis’ humorous approach.

Read the full interview after the jump!

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Paola Pivi’s Feathered Polar Bears

img-paola-pivi_105236522014

Paola Pivi - sculpture

Paola Pivi - sculpture

Last year Beautiful Decay featured Paola Pivi’s 360 Degree Rotating Airplane in New York City Plaza.  Pivi is making art headlines again with her fantastical feather-clad polar bears.  Influenced by the surrealists, Pivi’s plumed bears walk the line between dream and reality.  They are her version of the ready-made.  Prone to “visions,” Pivi says that she often sees animals located in a strange setting.  For her most recent show, entitled Ok, you are better than me, so what?, at Galerie Perrotin’s new space in New York, Pivi created a series of sculptures influenced by a vision she had of a polar bear dancing with a grizzly bear.  Rather than taxidermy actual animals, Pivi had an expert create bears from urethane foam, plastic, and feathers.  The results are fantastic in the truest sense of the word.  Meaning, they are imaginative, fanciful and slightly absurd.

In proper surrealist fashion the bears engage an element of surprise and unusual juxtapositions, which Pivi strives to create with all her work.  The bears, for instance, embody several contradictions.  All at once they are both real and whimsical, frightening and amusing, and serious and absurd.  Mostly though, they seem like a lot of fun.

Pivi has lived all over the world, but currently resides in New Delhi, India.  Her show that opened Sept 18th at Galerie Perrotin’s New York location will be up through October 26th.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Art We Love.

Walls, we’ve all got them. Now, it’s the New Year and there’s no better time to start decorating – or re-decorating – those blank barriers.

ArtWeLove is an innovative, curated online art store with a selective catalogue of exclusive limited edition artworks. They work directly with top contemporary artists such as Tomoo Gokita (seen above, Night and Day for $75), Francesca GabbianiShelter Serra, and Molly Dilworth to produce thought provoking, hand picked archival pigment prints and Digital C-prints.  Each piece comes immaculately packed for your artwork’s protection plus every work is numbered, embossed, and accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist.

You can rest assured each ArtWeLove edition will enrich your walls, spar rousing conversations, and elicit pride within your collection – maybe, even, some envy among friends. Not to mention, their prints come in standard sizes, making it easy for you to add your personal touch when choosing the perfect frame to complete your interior makeover.  All of this, and we’re certain you won’t tap into your holiday bonus because ArtWeLove editions start at $15 and go up to $2,000, a bargain given the museum-quality of the prints and the caliber of artist.

To further inspire Beautiful/Decay readers to jump-start their New Year’s art collection, ArtWeLove offers an exclusive $5 off your first purchase when you sign up to their FIRST VIEW email. To join, simply go to ArtWeLove.com and follow the next steps.

Currently Trending

A Temple Of Love Built Out Of Neon Colors, Geometric Patterns And Bold Typography

agape-photo11

agape-photo09

agape-photo02

agape-photo08

If the Beatles were right and all you need is love, I’ll take Morag Myerscough and Luke Morgan’s version thank you very much. Built for the Festival of Love held in Southbank Centre, London (June 28 – August 31, 2014), The Temple of Agape is a visual feast. Neon colors, geometric patterns, and bold typography combine to make love a vibrant, exciting place to be.

The structures are inspired by those encountered by Myerscough in India and elsewhere in Asia where bamboo is used extensively for scaffolding as well as the Watts Towers in LA. The vibrant colours and handpainted lettering are similarly inspired.

Much of the success of the design is due to the restraint shown by Myerscough and Morgan, which may seem counterintuitive when looking at the riotous structure. Look closer, though, and you’ll see that there is one typeface and one type treatment. The color palette is strictly controlled, a neon rainbow, plus pink, black, and white. All of the shapes are simple and geometric; even the counters of the letters are removed, streamlining the shapes of the letters. Minimizing the design elements allows the installation to be ebullient but not overwhelming.

The Festival celebrates the legalization of Same Sex Couple Act by choosing seven Greek words describing love. Myerscough and Morgan’s were given Agape, a spiritual, selfless love; the love of humanity. Their temple represents the power of love to conquer hate.

“The Temple stands proud like a peacock with its giant Martin Luther King quote, expressing the power of love to the world,” say Myerscough and Morgan. “Inside its heart is calm and dappled with light for contemplating complex emotions, a place that can transform with Love expressed within.”

This is a temporary construction, which is a shame. The world could use more love, especially when it’s executed so beautifully. (Via Creative Review) Photos by Gareth Gardner.

Currently Trending

The Landscape Paintings Of Robert Josiah Bingaman

Robert Josiah Bingaman is the master of beautiful dark landscapes. Bingaman states about his work: “My studio practice is an idiosyncratic teeter-totter; a shifting set of consistent obsessions. The first, to be “out there”, in the distant places, and the second, an anxious need to permanently mark the rare, fleeting moments that originate from those places. The scenes I paint are the result of an indulgent desire to regain the innocence and satisfaction I once associated with the subjects depicted. Yet, in the offing, these paintings reveal my struggle to name what I haven’t found.”

Currently Trending

Gruesome Yet Tender Portraits Of Dead Animals Will Leave You Breathless

Fox 2, from the series Down to SleepCoyote, from the series Down to SleepDeer 1, from the series Down to Sleep

Pheasant, from the series Down to Sleep

Stung by the human desire to avert one’s eyes from death and decaying bodies, Emma Kisiel presents Down to Sleep, a series of images that—-like her other series At Rest forces us to kneel in mourning over the bodies forgotten dead animals,. As she happens upon an animal, she crouches down, fixes each within a compassionate and gentle frame, immortalizing each in a way evocative of Victorian post-mortem photography, each appearing as if he is merely asleep.

Kisiel’s subjects, their lives affirmed and dignified despite their tragic and lonesome deaths, are afforded a painfully loving final farewell. Through their passings, their bodies are sectioned off and dissected by the artist’s frame, leaving only the most poignant physical markers of a meaningful life; with each patch of fur, each tooth and eye, each clasped claw, the viewer is permitted to examine the creature with a balefully sensual intimacy.

Viewers are invited to engage with each animal in a funerary ritual free of any artifice that might make their demise more palatable; they aren’t embalmed, stuffed, or even buried. The are left, haloed in nature’s humble offerings of grass or pebbles, in the exact place and time at which their lives were taken; as time passes, we recognize that these sleepy bodies will disintegrate.

Each animal subject, shot in natural light, offers an honest rendition of death, for as hard as the Kisiel’s camera might work to give meaning to a life lost, it also relentlessly reminds us that discarded bodies will inevitably be vanished and consumed by the earth. But perhaps this is the most compassionate way in which we can examine the dead, as eventually forgotten yet eternally potent reminders of the preciousness of life; in these happenstance grave sites, a simple but meaningful meditation on existence take place. (via Lenscratch)

Currently Trending

Makeup Artist Tal Peleg Transforms Her Eyelids Into Animals, Famous Paintings, And Emotional Messages

Foxy Eye

Foxy Eye

Girl With The Moon

Girl With The Moon

The Little Prince

The Little Prince

Salvador Dali

Salvador Dali

In a combination of makeup art and illustration, Israeli artist Tal Peleg has turned her eyelids into expressive canvases. Peruse her collection and you will see eyes and brow bones masterfully transformed into emotional landscapes, various animals, and renditions of famous paintings and movie scenes. Each piece is painstakingly achieved using a combination of eye shadows, watercolors, eyeliners, and tiny brushes, taking hours to perfect. The result is a series of artworks—ephemeral in nature—that express identity and creativity in unique ways.

“Makeup is an amazing form of art, and I use it in order to make my eye tell a story,” Peleg wrote on Bored Panda. “Inspiration is all around me, and I give my own unique artistic interpretation using makeup. It can be inspired by emotions, movies, fairytales, animals, food, important social matters, and more.” (Source)

The eye is the proverbial “window to the soul”—the lens through which our inner states become visible to others. It is incredible how the mood of Peleg’s ice-blue iris appears to shift depending on the artwork and narrative that surrounds it. As mentioned above, the topic range of Peleg’s eye-art is vast; some explore scenes of child-like innocence, while others convey important social messages, such as the pain and isolation of bullying, and the spiraling, dark coils of depression. With incredible detail and sensitivity, Peleg has captured these themes and experiences well, with her eye as the deep locus that communicates their significance on intuitive, emotional levels.

Visit Peleg’s Facebook and Instagram to see more. (Via deMilked)

Currently Trending

Roxanne Jackson

Roxanne Jackson Ceramic Sculpture

Roxanne Jackson creates some fantastically creepy ceramic work.

Currently Trending