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Jennifer Davis

Jennifer Davis is a painter based out of Minneapolis, Minnesota with, among other things, a great color palette, mixing muted hues with more vibrant pops of pink and yellow. Her paintings are delightfully quirky too. I mean, have you ever seen a skeleton wearing striped toe socks, or a purple goat sporting a multi-colored sweater? Well, you and I have now.

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Trevor And Ryan Oakes’ Intricate Sculptures Made Out of Thousands Of Matchsticks

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Twin brothers Trevor and Ryan Oakes create works which investigate and analyze perspective, perception and the shapes that are intrinsically connected to the way we view the world around us. In addition to incredibly-detailed renderings on curved paper, the brothers Oakes create particularly interesting sculptural works from metaphorically-loaded materials, like the matchstick sculptures pictured above.

Though made from simple materials, their construction was anything but. The Colorado-born, New York-based artist’s match sculptures were difficult to create, as the review in Ignant documents, the “first form was a small grid of matchsticks which curved in two directions to become a portion of the surface of a sphere. After that, they set out on building an entire dome, starting with a ring of matches on a table surface upon which additional rings were stacked. The form didn’t quite want to emerge into a dome though unless a small amount of space was manually added between the match heads. Curiosity eventually caught them an they began to look for a form that would emerge if they didn’t manually space the heads and let the matches truly guide their own behavior. A sea-shell-like spiral unexpectedly emerged.”

The Oakes describe the shapes created from the matchsticks as a reflection of naturally developing forms. “Forms that occur naturally predicated upon simple rules, or building codes; in this case placing one matchstick next to another and allowing the fact that as the head is a slightly different width than the stick, a form will occur naturally.”

The sculptures possess an immediate cultural recognition being made from commonly used objects, and are given more weight when thousands of them are collected together. But they also hold a seductive energy because the inherent reactive possibilities of the materials.  Matchsticks immediately insinuate fire, and collected matchsticks offer the potential for a chain-reaction, a possibility which adds to the idea of power in great numbers. (via Ignant)

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Now You Can Get Married In A Wedding Chapel That Looks Like A Rainbow Filled Kaleidoscope

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If you’re thinking about getting married and want to take your vows under a unique environment you can hop a plane to Shanghai China. There a company called Coordination Asia has designed The Rainbow Wedding Chapel modeled after the inside of a kaledeiscope. It takes the classic idea of this creative toy and proceeds to realize it on a larger scale. Using glass, mirrors, and paint in an array of colors it gives couples an alternative to more traditional nuptial environments. It looks super pretty and signifies many different things that have changed in our culture. For one how artists today are looking to affect on a broader scale and influence many opposed to a few. It also shows how traditions in our time are now flexible.

The chapel definitely has a new age feel. The architecture is circular signifying life’s continuous flow. The beautiful colors make for aesthetic bliss and no wonder someone would think to design it for that special day. You can adjust hue and choose how many of them you want reflected on the walls. Altogether 3,000 glass panels and 65 colors make up the chapel.

Based in Shanghai, China, Coordination Asia continues to be an innovator in glass design. The company recently curated an exhibit entitled “Keep It Glassy” showing large scale installations using the material.  (via mymodernmet)

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Erin Rachel Hudak’s Public Installations Celebrate Love And Color

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The always-colorful work by Erin Rachel Hudak has the distinct ability to seduce with its bright and vibrant appearance.  Hudak consistently produces work that looks happy and exudes love.  The attraction, while complete, can be somewhat misleading, and upon closer inspection Hudak has often encoded a message, lesson, or suggestion hidden within the colorful work.

“Love You Forever,” a temporary installation in both New York and Idaho, included mylar balloons.  An adoring public service announcement in both locals, the installations became  celebrated destinations.  However, despite the message of everlasting adulation, the installations were completely fleeting.  On the one hand the works were romantic and beautiful gestures, or from another perspective they were impossible promises.

Often Hudak entertains such distinctions, juxtapositions and opposites—using the way ideas are defined by separation from other ideas.  The concept is almost always referencing, or completed by, the viewer.  Her outdoor installation-to-be at Paul Artspace in St. Louis involves a mirrored sculpture that reads “You Are My Reflection,” involving the viewer in a process of self-analysis.  Combined with a rich visual vocabulary involving metaphors and language, Hudak’s works are always highly symbolic.

Catch her latest installation at the SPRING/BREAK Art Show taking place this weekend in New York.  “Waterfall Wall” installed in the stairway of the SPRING/BREAK space is a cascading barrage of color and reflective surface.  It is the visual manifestation of Hudak’s observations about power, freedom, access and restriction.

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The Awkward Tension And Beauty Of Natalie Krick’s Mother

 

Powerful photographs by Natalie Krick of her mother.

“The colorful seductive nature of cosmetics act to mask, conceal and deceive while drawing attention to the surface and the superficial. By emphasizing both the facade of glamour and the physicality of the body I am interested in what can be revealed through these surfaces.

In this collection of photographs of my mother she performs certain tropes used to visualize female beauty and sexuality. This act is further complicated as her appearance and gestures fluctuate between my overt stylized ideals and her own physical body. These photographs expose an awkwardness and tension in being looked at and scrutinized while also implying a longing to be seen as desirable and beautiful. By creating images that can be perceived as both garish and seductive, I question the fantasy of idealized beauty and what culture designates as flattering and desirable.” (via)

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Riusuke Fukahori’s Incredibly Realistic Golfish Sculptures Made Out Of Resin

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Riusuke Fukahori, a Japanese artist with an endearing obsession with goldfish, paints three-dimensional renditions of the fish by using a complex process of poured resin on authentic Japanese household containers.

Fukahori strives to paint the goldfish as realistically as possible. His love for the funny looking fish goes beyond words, and the only way to truly pay homage to his ‘friends’ is through creating these unbelievably real-looking sculptures made out of resin. Fukahori keeps dozens of goldfish in tanks and buckets around his studio, he sits and watches the goldfish when he feels uninspired or simply needs company.

His work can be quite deceiving; the goldfish look so real that when people first see his work they find it impossible not to try to reach into the ‘water’ and touch the ‘fish.’

Each of Fukahori’s resin pieces [the resin goldfish] are contained in a variety of everyday Japanese household items. His usage of these items in his work reflects a personal touch, as many of the containers used were bowls and cups that he himself used for years.

The goldfish resin sculptures entail very complicated, repetitive, and labor intensive steps. He first pours a layer of resin, then lets it dry, then paints a small portion of the fish, then lets it dry, then pours another layer of resin—he patiently repeats these steps until the final product is achieved.

“I didn’t invent resin and not the first to use resin. I am not a resin artist. I am a goldfish artist. I think it’s obvious which pieces are Riusuke Fukahori pieces because the imitators use the wrong containers. They will never understand goldfish the way I do. They are only copying the craft, not the soul.”

The Painted Breath, an exhibition of new resin works and paintings by Fukahori, will be on exhibition at the Joshua Liner Gallery in New York on November 21st,2013 till January 18th,2014.

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A Hole In The Place Of Heart

When the violence of individuals generates the birth of a strange collective monster, anything is possible… A surrealist vision of inhumanity.
PS. this was all done with sand animation!

PSS. By David Myriam

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Dreamy Sculptures Based On Familiar Objects From Artists Home

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Canberra, Australia based artist Jacqueline Bradley creates artwork that is perhaps best described as dreamy – sleepily strange.  Her sculptural work is squarely based on familiar objects that recall a house and the home life inside.  Yarn, glasses, dinnerware all seem to diverge subtly but perceptibly from normal use.  In this way the sculptures seem more like playful memories of objects than the actual objects themselves.  Bradley’s work explores the home as a place and the way people engage with it.

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