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21st Century Filth

Design duo Ben Tegel and Brian Romero combine their mighty illustrative skills to form the collective 21st Century Filth. Their pop punch vulgar street grit sensibility calls to mind the cantankerous and misogynistic godfather of underground comix, R. Crumb. Check out more of their stuff at their website; linked above.

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Doucin Pierre A.K.A. Soemone

Doucin Pierre - Soemone

 

Nice portfolio update by paris based designer Doucin Pierre. More samples of work after the jump. 

 

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Hundreds Of Copies Of The Wizard Of Oz Create Hypnotic Waves Of Color

Dennis Neuschaefer-Rube

The Wizard of Oz experiment from Dennis Neuschaefer-Rube on Vimeo.

When creating his reinterpretations of Technicolor masterpiece The Wizard Of Oz, German artist Dennis Neuschaefer-Rube didn’t limit himself to a singular medium. Dabbling in video manipulation, installation and printed ephemera, his “experiment” exists as a deep dive into what happens when the artist points the focus away from narrative, and instead zeroes in on visual velocity. He chooses to takes a step back, and re-imagines the film as a series of frames—laid side-by-side in a technique he refers to as “stilling film.”

In this 2-minute preview of Neuschaefer-Rube’s video piece, you can see hundreds of copies of the film, playing simultaneously in a hypnotic wave of color fluctuation. In the exhibited form, this work is accompanied by a printed version of the investigation, a singular film still, and a large (somewhat ominous) black box designed for viewing. Neuschaefer-Rube’s ability to steer the viewer’s attention from piece to piece is masterful, with each element of the experiment hitting just the right notes—perhaps making a slight nod to the Great and Powerful himself.

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Lucy Gaylord-Lindholm’s Remixed Oil Painting

 

Lucy Gaylord-Lindolm’s  remixed take on traditional oil painting and art history injects elements of surrealism and pop culture into a familiar setting. Characters from The Wizard of Oz and Pinocchio find their way into the artist’s cleverly referenced paintings, establishing bold compositions where perfectly good paintings once already existed. The result causes us to look a little deeper into that which we previously took for granted. I’ll go wherever she’s leading with these. (via)

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MARQUISMONTES

Collaborators Marquismontes must be a fashion shoot chameleon, able to shoot in hundreds of various styles, looks, and techniques that keeps the viewer on their toes and wondering what  they’ll do next!

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Samuel T. Adams

Stacked, packed, and tacked collages by Samuel T. Adams.

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The Art Of Disappearing: Stefanie Klavens Documents Vanishing Drive-Ins

Stefanie Klavens- Photography Stefanie Klavens- Photography Stefanie Klavens- Photography Stefanie Klavens- Photography

Stefanie Klavens has a love for 20th century pop culture and Americana. In her articulate photographic series, titled “Vanishing Drive-Ins,” Klavens documents the disintegration of the American drive-in. Once a popular social and entertainment aspect, it has been slowly disappearing from the United States. As Klavens explains, “The drive-in has suffered the same fate as the single screen theater. Before World War II the drive-in was a modest trend, but after the war the craze began in earnest, peaking in popularity in the late 1950s and early 1960’s. Drive-ins were ideal for the modern family, everyone jumped into the car, no babysitter needed. ‘Car culture’ had officially arrived as a dominant force on the American scene.”

Despite the rapid popularity of the drive-in, they simply could not stand the test of time. Klavens attributes their decline to the evolution of technology and altered views of land: “Over time, changing real estate values began to have an effect on the drive-in. Land became too valuable for a summer-only business. Widespread adoption of daylight saving time in the mid 1960’s subtracted an hour from outdoor evening screening time. The decline was further hastened by the advent of VCRs and home video rentals. In the 1950s there were over 4,000 drive-ins nationwide. Today there are fewer than 400.”

These photographs, with their heavily saturated colors and blurry prolonged exposures, showcase some of the few drive-ins that are still functioning with a romantic nostalgia. The structures and signage may be antiquated, but the car types and models are a dead ringer for our era.

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Seiko Kato

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Brighton, England’s very own artist Seiko Kato’s work is something you think you’d find at an antique boutique. But looking closer, it’s not necessarily something you would buy for your grandmother’s birthday.  Her work is Victorian era meets contemporary design. Kato’s inspiration lies in Victorian medical books, old Victorian drawings and encyclopedias, and Victorian paraphernalia. Kato is also a collage artist and illustrator.

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