Get Social:

Qiu Minye Captures Light And Time Standing Still In These Glowing Photographs

Qiu Minye Qiu MinyeQiu MinyeQiu Minye

In his new show “My GodQiu Minye presents us with a new way of seeing. Well, he at least offers us a new way of experiencing objects and the recording of those 3-dimensional things with photography. By painting with light, Minye has suggested different forms of objects that could be real, and then photographed them, resulting in haunting, iridescent, airy images. Whether it is an outline of several figures huddled together watching something in the distance, or an ambiguous geological shape, mythological creatures or floating forms of babies, these snapshots all belong to another space and time.

Minye’s playful images all have a gracefulness to them, and more than most photographs seem to have successfully frozen a moment in time. By removing any fussy details (whether it is light, shadow or color) that may anchor an object in the mundane, he has elevated the idea of the object/subject to something majestic and mystical. The fish for example seems to spitting sparks of fire and is caught in an ethereal state – in a way we don’t see our everyday fish. Minye has managed to capture some sort of life force or see-able movable energy and it is a very calming thing to witness. He has a very existential approach to his art. He poses numerous questions when speaking about his past photographic projects:

What part of humanity is lost in time? How can we transform these moments into eternity? There are always two worlds, the world of yesteryear that has collapsed and the real world. Here, it is to travel between the two. (Source)

Minye seems to be coercing a particular response out of his audience – suggesting we look at the things surrounding us in an abstract, philosophical way – where it’s more about the idea of the thing rather than the tangibility of it. (Via Designboom)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Spew Barrymore

I have blogged about Lachlann Rattray before in the stone and mortar days of our old blog, but now that we have these nifty “tag” things, I wanted to formally re-introduce this artist to the new system as one of my fave Flickr-Finds-Forevs along with some of his new stuff. His work is hilarious and almost always composed of gooey deformed pastel neon combinations- usually mocking celebrities and humans in general. He also prints his own awesome shirts and sweatshirts. They’re all so good I don’t know how to choooooseeeeeeee ahhhhhh….

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Jaime Zuverza’s Lo-Fi Retro Rock Posters

I always see those “Keep Austin Weird” stickers everywhere and now that I’ve seen the work of Jaime Zuverza it all makes sense. This Texan illustrator/designer’s lo-fi sensibility mixed with ironic retro imagery is the stuff that’s dreamed of for rock posters. Each mixed media poster is magnificently stranger than the last proving that Jaime is doing his part to keep thing pretty damn weird in Austin!

Currently Trending

Nøne Futbol Club’s Humorous And Subversive Sculptures And Installations

Nøne Futbol Club installation10 Nøne Futbol Clubinstallation1

Nøne Futbol Club installation3

Nøne Futbol Club is a duo of Paris based artists.  They work in a wide variety of mediums and forms from video to installation.  However, nearly all of their work seems to be tied together by a certain mischievous sense of humor.  Though not always overtly political, the duo’s art is definitely subversive.  For example, consider Lift a Finger, the first piece pictured here.  The maneki-neko, usually a statuette of a welcoming or beckoning cat suddenly becomes hostile with a simple change of hand gesture.  The pharase “KEEP WARM BURNOUT THE RICH”  is turned into a branding iron.  The implement not only burns, but more importantly is a tool for displaying and designating ownership.

Nicolas Rosette goes onto describe the duo’s practice saying:

“Nøne Futbol Club is a duo that is capable of mobilizing as many accomplices as necessary to make their works and performances.
The playful component is inseparable from their creative process which tackles the world like a playground for the expression of an art whose nature has continually bordered on the cellophane of the white cube and the great palaces must take the risk of being a mass distribution product. The recursive principle in their work is reversal. It is not about diverting elements from pop culture(or popular culture, the term changing depending on whether this culture comes to us from one side or the other of the Atlantic Ocean) but of a reversal whose final address is always popular culture. A double inversion, whose process of revelation reflects back to us as in a mirror the possible destiny of an art world which has become less subtle than the current popular media cultures; whose practices of critical and jubilatory diversions are the foundation. Would the Nøne Futbol Club be applying to contemporary art what digital cultures have subjected Chuck Norris, the pope and Darth Vader to?”

Currently Trending

Eko Nugroho

Working with thick dark outlines, Eko Nugroho‘s graphic technique and imagery reflect Indonesia’s media-rich and politically charged environment. The artist cites Malaysian cartoonist Lat, TV series from the 1980s such as Megaloman and wayang kulit (shadow puppets) as early influences. His part man-part machine characters are often accompanied by bizarre and ironic statements in speech bubbles or t-shirt slogans. At times, they can be menacing, displaying the potential for violence – wielding sharp objects in their hands, or with weapons as limbs. In others, they come across as scientific experiments gone wrong –a la B-grade films – where humans mutate into alien-like creatures, sprouting plastic flowers from their orifices, crouching on all fours with test tubes and strange objects growing from different parts of their bodies. Imbued with macabre humour and satire, Nugroho’s comic inspired work may come across as seemingly straightforward – often a central figure standing against a simple background, presented as a series of simple scenes from a larger narrative – while the artist’s inimitable pating tlecek style of fusing and juxtaposing a wide range of visual elements (and languages), lends his work a certain layer of absurdity.

Currently Trending

New Anthology Interview: Human Empire

Human Empire is a multidisciplinary design collective that creates playful and iconic works. Beautiful/Decay recently interviewed them about how their collective was started, their influences, and recent projects.

Currently Trending

Michal Macku’s Manipulated Gellage Self Portraits

Since the end of 1989, Michal Macku has used his own creative technique which he has named “Gellage” (the ligature of collage and gelatin). The technique consists of transfer the exposed and fixed photographic emulsion from its original base on paper. This transparent and plastic gelatin substance makes it possible to reshape and reform the original images, changing their relationships and endowing them with new meanings during the transfer.

“I use the nude human body (mostly my own) in my pictures. Through the photographic process [of Gellage], this concrete human body is compelled to meet with abstract surroundings and distortions. This connection is most exciting for me and helps me to find new levels of humanness in the resulting work.
I am always seeking new means of expression and, step by step, I am discovering almost unlimited possibilities through my work with loosened gelatin. Photographic pictures mean specific touch with concrete reality for me, one captured level of real time. The technique of Gellage which I am using helps me to take one of these “time sheets” and release a figure, a human body, from it, causing it to depend on time again. Its charm is similar to that of cartoon animation, but it is not a trick. It is very important for me to be aware of the history of a picture and to have a sense of direct contact with its reality. My work places “body pictures” in new situations, new contexts, new realities, causing their “authentic” reality to become relative. I am interested in questions of moral and inner freedom. I do what I feel, and only then do I begin to meditate on what the result is. I am often surprised by the new connections I find in it. Naturally, I start out with a concrete intention, but the result is often very different. And there, I believe, lies a hitch. One creates to communicate what can not be expressed in any other way. Then comes the need to describe, to define.” (via)

Currently Trending

Artwork Of The Day: Dale Edwin Murray’s Fast Food

I love these minimal fast food prints by illustrator Dale Edwin Murray. His minimal grid based examination of fast food makes me want to buy a print and a super sized order of fries all at once!

Currently Trending