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Unreal Holographic Wire Sculptures By Seung Mo Park

Seung Mo Park - Sculpturewire Sculpturewire Sculpture wire Sculpture

South Korean artist Seung Mo Park crafts wire into sculpture and the two-dimensional into the three-dimensional. With his Maya series, he painstakingly recreates photographs into holographic wire sculptures with downright ethereal results.
Using stainless steel wire mesh, Park creates his sculptures layer by layer, snipping away to create the illusion of depth and shading. In some cases, it looks as though an artist’s doodle has popped out of his sketchbook. Park shows his versatility in creating boldly three-dimensional sculptures as well as pieces that perfectly imitate the graininess of a black-and-white photo.

His work is stunningly photorealistic.

Though many of his sculptures are hauntingly evocative, his subjects caught mid-despair or appearing like vengeful steely-eyed angels, Park also has a playful side. In a work called “MAYA MONA LIZA,” he pays homage to the most mysterious smile in the world. In his Object series, he recreates known objects such as a contrabass and famous sculptures like “The Thinker.” With his treatment, they almost seem to emerge out of the static, in some cases only merely suggesting form and function. A piece called “Buddha,” created with bronze wire and fiber glass, looks as though a person is being buried in a sand dune of time. In other works, from his Human series, his subjects spring to life fully formed.

If you gaze at Park’s work for long enough, it almost seems as though he has dialed into some special channel caught between realities. A slight turn to the right and maybe his subject will become a real boy once and for all. A slight turn to the left and these ghostly figures might be subsumed forever.

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Stratis Tavlaridis Constructs Ethereal, Geometric Clothing Out Of Cut Paper

Stratis Tavlaridis - Papercut Stratis Tavlaridis - Papercut Stratis Tavlaridis - Papercut Stratis Tavlaridis - Papercut

Stratis Tavlaridis is a Greek artist who constructs perforated objects out of paper. His works are inspired by everyday life, and with his eye for geometric patterns and flowing designs, he transforms ordinary items into ethereal manifestations of themselves. Featured here is a selection of his fashion pieces—shirts and vests that have been immaculately hewn with overlapping shapes and twisting, snake-like outlines. The use of negative space in each object gives it a silky, luminescent quality as light filters through the gaps.

Tavlaridis’ other works include other “textile” objects, such as carpets, tablecloths, and drapery. Often these pieces are included in larger installations, such as Perforated: Weavings of Cohabitation, a homage to his ancestry and culture. Another remarkable piece is his recreation of King Phillip II’s funerary monument—a gauzy, layered entranceway intended to evoke the experience of entering a hallowed space. Whatever he creates using his masterful technique, each of Tavlaridis’ papercut objects is imbued with an awe-striking presence and divine beauty.

Visit his Cargo Collective page to learn more.

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Matt Johnson

Matt Johnson
Today I was reminded of one of the coolest sculptures I’ve ever seen, Matt Johnson’s The Pianist (after Robert J. Lang). I saw this piece at the Hammer Museum a couple of months ago and was completely floored. Have you ever seen something you thought was truly amazing and your face starts to get all big and bug-eyed, and you feel tingles running down your back, and you start saying things like ‘whoa, dude, oh man!’ Well that was me at the Hammer that day, and maybe I looked like a fool, but it was totally worth it. Johnson’s work is full of warmhearted humor, and when an artist is able to rekindle that sense of childhood wonderment in your imagination, you just have to stop and savor the moment.

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Edie Fake Knows How To Handle a Pen

Edie Fake resides in Chicago.  In his work with zines, comics, and illustration, he applies a unique sense of design to playful postmodern compositions, and creates original musings on eroticism with subtle, deft penwork. He recently received a book grant from Printed Matter in NYC. He does pretty rad tattoos as well.

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Nadine Boughton’s Clever Collage Creations

Feast your eyes on the highly amusing creations of Massachusetts-based photographer Nadine Boughton. When the artist came across a collection of vintage men’s adventure magazines (…think “Weasels Ripped My Flesh!” and “Chewed To Bits By Giant Turtles!”) at a flea market, she was inspired to combine their over-the-top renderings of burly men saving damsels-in-distress with the clean interiors spotted in contemporary Better Homes and Gardens.

About the series, the artist says: “Here is a collision of two worlds: men’s adventure magazines or “sweats” meets Better Homes and Gardens. These photocollages are set against the backdrop of the McCarthy era, advertising, sexual repression, WWII and the Korean War. The cool, insular world of mid-century modern living glossed over all danger and darkness, which the heroic male fought off in every corner.” (Via Flavorwire)

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The Awkward Beauty Of Watching Complete Strangers Kiss For The First Time

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When director Tatia Pilieva instructed couples to kiss, she did so with a twist. The two kissers are complete strangers, and don’t even know each other’s names. In this intriguing short film, aptly titled, First Kiss, we watch each of these people meet, realize they must smooch, and proceed to do so. Not surprisingly, it’s a little awkward for most of them, but when it happens, the moment is endearing and beautiful.

As you watch this three and a half minute video, there’s varied responses to what Pilieva asks. Some people try and make a joke out of it while others look nervous. One person introduces themselves. Finally, they all go for it, and the kisses range from a full-on make out to a shorter, more diplomatic kiss. It’s interesting to see how quickly people become comfortable with each other and are able to let go of their inhibitions to embrace the moment.

Aside from the charming concept, you might have noticed that everyone is nicely dressed and is conventionally good looking. As Jezebel and other media outlets have pointed out, this video is actually and ad for the clothing line, Wren. While it might be an inconvenient truth that no doubt puts a damper on the spontaneity of the video, it doesn’t totally detract from the pleasure we get from watching it.

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Phillip Toledano Photographs Of Extreme Plastic Surgery (NSFW)

3.jpg.CROP.article920-large Phillip Toledano Phillip Toledano

In Phillip Toledano’s new book, A New Kind of Beauty, you will find photographs of those whom have gone through extreme cosmetic surgery. The images are quite shocking, but there is also something quite unusual about them; you can see, through the sitters’ victorious stances, that they actually feel quite powerful and actually beautiful.

‘A New Kind of Beauty’ possesses an interesting aesthetic. The photographer decides to portray his subjects, not under a glamorous light, but instead in way which exudes an air of strength and power. Although the artist says that he is referencing 16th century artist Hans Holbein (which he is) I say that he is also reflecting an aesthetic that very clearly references that of Greek and Roman sculpture. I find it compelling that Toledano’s juxtaposes something so contemporary as cosmetic surgery, to something so dated. But, his line of thought makes sense.

We all know that the Greek and Romans were obsessed with beauty, perfection and youth. They found beauty in perfect young bodies, hence the many grand sculptures of young naked bodies (usually men). Their stance, for the most part, was stoic; emotion made the beauty fade away…their stance was always upright, a symbol of power and honor. Similarly, the photographer renders his sitters in poses that clearly show off their wannabe young bodies and faces (some are covered by draped robes and veils, yet another detail that references this particular stylistic period). They stand tall and emotionless, even if their highly transformed faces say otherwise. Their ‘beauty’ is fake, but it is theirs, and they are owning it.

In a way, Toledano is documenting contemporary human beauty as well as ‘admiring beauty’ in the same way the Greeks and Roman did in their time.

“We will be able to redefine what it means to look human, and I think these people are the vanguard of that type of evolution.”

However, it differs in that this kind of beauty is manufactured and maybe not so beautiful after all.  The photographer wants to make sure we realize that this is our society’s standards of beauty. Whether it is actually beautiful or not, real or not, well that’s not something to fret about. It is an obvious fact that the public is eager for perfection, youth, and hypersexualized physical attributes, so here’s the outcome of the pressures to be just that.

“I wanted to make beautiful and distinguished portraits of these people. … I wanted to represent a particular part of beauty from our time. It will be very interesting to see in a few years time how I compare physically to these projected images.”

The book A New Kind of Beauty is available for purchase. (via Fast Codesign)

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The Big Whales!

Shay Church’s massive sculptures are made using wooden armatur and wet clay and sand. Absolutely amazing!

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