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Kamolpan Chotvichai’s Shredded Self-Portraits Produce The Illusion Of Glitchy Dissolution

chotvichai14 chotvichai6 chotvichai3 chotvichai2

Kamolpan Chotvichai explores the limitations of paper by carefully hand-cutting portraits of herself and rendering an effect of dissolution based on the Buddha’s teaching on anatta (no self). Parts of Chotvichai’s human form appear warped and melted, almost glitchy, as if they are about to disintegrate; the artist’s careful attention to the direction and shape of her cuts produces an elegant illusory effect. Chotvichai explains,

One’s adhering to something can cause the greatest misery in life especially being attached to self-existing. The idea of this self-existing is actually self-formed and leads to variety of emotions. The temper, the mind and the body altogether gradually form the idea of being alive but when putting into consideration, without any substance, it is merely the thought that we think we are existing…The way I create my work is to set consciousness and concentration by slitting and cutting on the portrait of myself which is considered to be the unconditional action of effort and attempt. This action is therefore to destroy and create the emptiness which will lead to the stage of naught.

Chotvichai was born, raised, and educated in Bangkok, where she currently resides. (via my amp goes to 11)

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Aaron Noble


Artist Profile: Aaron Noble from By Osmosis TV on Vimeo.

 

Beautiful/Decay has teamed up with By Osmosis TV once again to mix words with one of our favorite artists Aaron Noble. Aaron is a long time collaborator with Beautiful/Decay Magazine and Beautiful/Decay Apparel, and is featured in Beautiful/Decay’s AtoZ gallery show at the Kopeikin Gallery.

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Enrico Ascoli & Donato Sansone

Another example of what you can do with lo-fi video techniques and some imagination!
Animation and concept by Donato Sansone
sound design by Enrico Ascoli

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Astounding Sculptures You Won’t Believe Are Made Of Cast Paper

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It is difficult to believe that the astounding, realistic sculptures of husband and wife duo Allen and Patty Eckman are cast from paper. Inspired by cast paper techniques of mid-20th century Mexico, the couple has developed and trademarked a unique process called the Eckman Method®. Pouring paper pulp instead of bronze into silicone moulds, they are able to produce lightweight sculptures with an astonishing level of detail. Allen’s work centers on the history of the American West and Native American civilization, content that blends seamlessly with Patty’s focus on wild flora and fauna.

Allen, who himself is of Cherokee descent, seems to pick up where 19th century American bronze artists like Hermon Atkins MacNeil or James Earle Fraser left off. Echoing the sentiment of these early settlers to the West, Eckman portrays the vanishing Native American population with dignity and reverence. Many of their sculptures are colossal, looming above viewers with magnificent authority. Others are miniature, precious to behold. The Eckmans capture scenes both active and pastoral with equal attention to detail; the cowboy, blazing ahead on horseback, lasso in hand, is seen with as much clarity as the native American hunter, who rests for a moment with his equine companion, absorbing the sights of the natural world. Like living specimens of times and cultures too rarely recorded by history, mothers and children dance in historically-accurate clothing.

In their stunning visual work, the Eckmans are able to merge a new, innovative process with subject matter as timeless as our country, breathing new life into the cannon of work created by great American sculptures of the past. (via BeautifulLife)

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Thomas Allen’s Pulp Fiction Pop-Up Photographs

Always Fascinated by pop-up books, Thomas Allen displays an infallible talent for the creation of the illusion of three dimensions, using old pulp fiction books as the subjects for his sets.These books tattered covers and yellowed pages are not mere objects to display on a shelf, for the artist but a prodigious inventory of actors and scenes, just waiting to be directed.

Allen patiently cuts out the figures, freeing them from their two-dimensional state: the actors are then raised from the covers and come alive thanks to skillful use of lighting and the camera’s lens. Bent and positioned, the scripted drama is staged, bringing to life the stories written and not written in the books that act now as the stories stage.

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Worlds Smallest Sculptures Made With Help Of Microscopes

When it comes to his artwork Russian sculptor Nikolai Aldunin thinks big but works small. How small you ask? So small that you need a microscope just to see it! Inspired by a Russian tale about a craftsman so talented that he put a horseshoe on a flea Aldunin set off  to make the famous story a reality. After two years of preparations and three months of painstaking work he accomplished his mission only to realize that he had found his true calling in the world of microminiature arts! See Aldunin’s famous horseshoe on a flea sculpture and many other tiny pieces after the jump! (via)

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Sebastien Wierinck

Sebastien Wierinck's public furnitureSebastien Wierinck's public furniture

Phrased very well by BLDGBLOG as a possible scenario and usage of Sebastien Wierinck’s public furniture: “After a long day at work, then, you would walk into your house – which has no permanent furniture – and you’d see a shimmering mass of black tubes swaying in a slight evening breeze above your head…You’d push several buttons, and the system would begin to move, drooping down in long loops and turning back and forth in tight corners and curves, all laying out the forms of temporary furniture – bed, table – as you get ready for a quiet night at home.” I love the photo documentation- each set of furniture seems to have its own mood.

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Marcelo Daldoce’s Origami Watercolor Works Conceal And Reveal The Human Figure Between The Folds

In Memory of You Watercolor on Paper 19"x43"

Here Comes the Sun Acrylic on Paper 24"x18"

Here Comes the Sun (detail)

35-year old artist Marcelo Daldoce is literally bringing a new dimension to art with his folded portraits of women. A native of Brazil now living in New York, Daldoce is a self-taught artist who began painting at 16. Daldoce’s previous work included large scale nudes incorporated with sophisticated typography, as well as portraits using wine as a medium. His early employment as an illustrator in an advertising agency left him with a distaste for the conventional and a need to make work that is expressive and innovative.

In his current work, geometric patterns conceal and reveal the women beneath, contorting their bodies into impossible shapes. He says:

“In bringing to life a flat surface, I strive to create a puzzle between what is real and what is illusion, what is painted and what is manipulated, turning paint to flesh, paper to sculpture.”

Daldoce’s primary medium is watercolor, which he has modernized through his technique and style. Color, pattern, image. It’s almost too much to process, which is where the origami-like folds come into play. The shadows cast obscure parts of the artwork, giving the eye a place to rest. “It’s mathematic, a process of folding, folding, folding,” he says. “Folding is actually the biggest job now because it takes more time. It’s more complex than just paint.”

In the portraits, the sharp edged paper is paradoxical to the soft curves and valleys of the women’s bodies, and this contrast is carried through the diverse elements of his work: hidden/exposed, abstract/figurative, flat/peaked, colorful/neutral, traditional/contemporary. The paintings leap off the wall dimensionally, but the bold display doesn’t overshadow the beauty of Daldoce’s captured women. (via Hi-Fructose)

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