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Barry McGee

A nice short video of Barry McGee installing in São Paulo Brazil. Not often that you see a street artist filmed in such a delicate, dreamy, and romantic style.

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Nezaket Ekici’s Liberates Herself By Cutting Off Her Hair

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Wearing a bright orange dress and armed with scissors, German artist Nezaket Ekici is tethered to the ceiling of a room via her hair. Long ropes act as handcuffs and are tied to the ends of her long brown strands. The only way out? To cut the strings or hair. Her performance, titled Atropos, was first presented in 2006 and again in 2008. It used 100 ropes, 100 hairlines, and 100 pitons (a type of metal spike) and lasted one hour.

We see that during Atropos, strings and hair are cut and dangle over Ekici’s eyes and other pieces of rope. At its core, it’s the act of freeing oneself from the ties (literally) that bind. In a statement about the work, posted on the Celeste Network:

She carries out an act of the self-liberation, while she frees herself with the help of a sissle from long ropes fastened at the roof and to the hair. She cuts off a part of her hair and in this way dissociates herself from a piece of herself. This work can be seen as a vital discussion about the question on the sense of life, that is partly characterised by striving for freedom. Particularly, because hair can be considered as a symbol of life.

This piece’s title comes from the Greek myth of the Moirai who are the goddesses of fate. The statement further explains:

Atropos, who is one of them splits according to the myth the fate threads of the life with a sissle. The artist shows with the radical act of the hair-cut a way out. She takes fate into her own hands and frees herself, like Atropos did. At least the act of the cutting can be seen as an attempt of liberation in itself. (Via Sweet Station)

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Only 15 Copies Of Book 2 Left!

Alright folks we are down to the last 15 copies of this book! Based on the sales from yesterday I give it one to two days before we sell out of Beautiful/Decay Book:2 forever! That’s right, once we sell out we will never reprint this book. Hop over to the shop and get your copy or you’ll be stuck surfing Ebay to complete your Beautiful/Decay collection!

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[hu]Man vs. Machine

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As his name hints, [hu]Man vs. Machine delivers work created with traditional materials in order to mimic what can be done with the computer. His work is very enjoyable and ranges from ink drawings to paintings to installations.

 

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Gregor Gaida’s Powerful Sculptures Depict Humans And Animals In States Of Violence And Vulnerability

Der Dornenauszieher (2013). Acrylic resin, acrylic glass, wood.

Der Dornenauszieher (2013). Acrylic resin, acrylic glass, wood.

Attaboys (Edition of 3 + 1 AP) (2012). Aluminium.

Attaboys (Edition of 3 + 1 AP) (2012). Aluminium.

Attaboys (Edition of 3 + 1 AP) (2012). Aluminium.

Attaboys (Edition of 3 + 1 AP) (2012). Aluminium.

Polygonal Horse (2011). Wood.

Polygonal Horse (2011). Wood.

Gregor Gaida is an artist based in Bremen, Germany, who is known for his sculptures of earth-shattering and bone-breaking power. Aggression, pain, and vulnerability permeate throughout his works as humans and animals engage in mysterious battles, writhe in torment, and stagger alone into defeat. “Attaboys” (2012), for example, features two hooded boys carving a deep line into the surrounding brick, as if marking territory; “Swog” (2013) displays two alien-like, fanged mouths locked together in a violent dual of equal power; “Canis Major III-I” (2014) shows a wounded dog lying on its side, its hind legs dismembered and sides cracked open. In these scenes of violence and passion, Gaida provides a complete story: each sculpture figuratively embodies a driving force, a moment of passion, the falling action, and the pain left behind.

As discussed in this article by Colossal, Gaida derives his figures from book and magazine imagery:

“The found footage is often no more than an impulse that is no longer discernible in the further development of the shape. Analogous to photography, my objects are three-dimensional snapshots. The characters are frozen in movement and often cropped along imaginary image borders. I transport the fragmented character of photos into the third dimension. Simultaneously, when dealing with color and options of shaping, painterly characteristics appear. Thus, the life-sized special interventions are formally attributed to sculpture but are equally part of painterly and photographic categories.” (Source)

These “fragmented” characters that Gaida adapts from print media have a strangely mythological-yet-contemporary appearance. Shattered, tortured torsos are reminiscent of the stone busts of Greek and Roman antiquity (see “Rest von Schwarz”); in “Polygonal Dog,” a Cerberus-type creature has been reimagined as a horrific laboratory mutant, five heads gnashing together instead of three. The multiplicity and fragmentation, however, is what lends Gaida’s sculptural “collages” a sense of power and beauty; they are grotesque and frightening, but look beyond the rage and wounds and there lies vulnerability, strength, and survival.

Visit Gaida’s website to view more of his spectacular work.

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Evelyn Benicova’s Anonymous And Bizarre Groupings Of Naked Bodies

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Evelyn Bencicova’s photography is stark and haunting, which could probably in part be attributed to the headless-ness of her subjects in most of her works. The colouring is sterile, and the figures’ body language imitates the stillness of their environment. Although each naked body touches at least one other, there is no sense of sexuality or pleasure. The bodies seem like one larger, unified organism, like some strange jellyfish or starfish. They splay themselves over surfaces, as if they’ve been washed up across the desk they rigidly lie on. They are compelling because although logically you realize you’re seeing a human body, they lack any recognizable aspects. It’s near impossible to feel empathy or understanding without facial features or visible imperfections or distinguishing character. It is especially with so many clones together. The series is an interesting experiment in identifying what defines our living human character.

I want to apologize in advance for making this comparison, but if I’m being completely honest, I’m reminded of the film Human Centipede. Of course, conceptually they are completely opposite, one being completely vile and horrific, the other pleasantly vacant. Still, if the Human Centipede were instead an experimental art film, maybe it would be the Human Starfish, and the film was about a multi-human entity that slowly explored an abandoned hospital or institution, these photos would be the stills.  (Via Daily Metal)

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Sarah Gamble’s Painted Portraits Of Alien Weirdos

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If you ever wondered what an alien looks like, painter Sarah Gamble could probably tell you. Her randomly frenetic drawings and paintings of beings not of this earth are filled with humor and expression which tell a story of everyday life. In multi-colored shapes and thick black lines Gamble explores another world that looks and acts much like our own. Her fascination with this subject matter began a few years ago when she became intrigued with invisible communication waves. This led to a series of paintings and drawings which resulted in incredible abstract shapes and forms in traditional landscapes.
She moved on to depictions of human-like entities which seemed encased in bondage or magical glitter. These eventually turned into portrait like weirdos. A new painting just posted on Instagram by the artist seems to take another turn for the bizarre. It encapsulates a very realistic style with a nod to nature’s primal instinct.
This past year, Gamble lived at The Roswell Residency in Roswell, New Mexico. She spent most of her time creating dozens of black ink drawings on paper depicting her beloved black cat Tony, along with a character known as “crazy man”. Other renderings included centaurs, teeth and hands. Many of these drawings ended up in a show called “Your Life Is Happening Now,” at Moore College Of Art and Design in Philadelphia. Running until March 14, 2015, it documents her day to day existence at Roswell, and touches on ideas of displacement, anxiety and fear.

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At The Intersection Of Classical And Modern

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Pop Round Vessel Sink, Randall Vessel Faucet, Transitional Floor Mount Bathtub Faucet, St. George Freestanding Soaking Tub

Thanksgiving 2003 by John Currin born 1962

John Currin, Thanksgiving 2003

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Pop Round Vessel Sink, Randall Vessel Faucet

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Cecily Brown

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St. George Pedestal Bathroom Sinks, Landfair Widespread Bathroom Faucets, Fitzgerald Two-Piece Elongated Toilet

DXV by American Standard is a landmark product line that represents the company’s storied history spanning 150 years. The collection spans four broad movements: Classic (1880 – 1920), Golden Era (1920 – 1950), Modern (1950 – 1990), and Contemporary (1990 – today).  Each piece in the carefully curated collection harkens back to the era it was inspired by and combines it with modern sensibilities, technology and performance. Although each fixture is inspired by a distinct era, the entire collection has a dialogue and the ability to cross over and create a remix of eras in one space. The pieces in the Classic Movement by DXV echo the curves, details and flair of times passed while integrating the technology of the present. Whether you’re a restoration buff who wants true-to-period pieces or someone who loves modern finishes with a nod to the past, the Classic Collection has something to round off any design. The designers working with DXV created timeless spaces with a nostalgic flair that feel both traditional and contemporary. Artists like John Currin, John McAllister and Cecily Brown all take cues from classical periods in art history, while recontextualizing them into modern color schemes, subject matter and treatments.

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