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Elisa Johns

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Elisa Johns has a new selection of oil paintings up at Mike Weiss Gallery. Within the exhibition, entitled “Huntress,” Johns draws from mythology, in particular the female goddess/heroine, for her subject matter. Her fragile, waifish women reference today’s “revered” paradigm of female beauty, the high fashion model, while her delicately dripping washes set within soft, sparse canvases call to mind the minimal compositions of Japanese scroll art. The exhibition will be on view until May 9th.

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Photographer Alexander Khokhlov Comments On Popular Culture Using Facepaint

 

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Using imagery taken from popular culture, photographer Alexander Khokhlov creates whimsical portraits of models with famous logos on their faces. By combining the brand with the figure chosen to sell it he examines the role personalities play in representing certain products and how they become associated with that brand sometimes for their whole careers. The placement of the logo incorporated onto the face from an aesthetic standpoint puts emphasis on the persona which sells it. Some of the logos which decorate the models faces then shot on black and white film include Mickey Mouse and Chanel . Besides commercial brands the artist has photographed paintings of corsets, lightning and eight balls on model’s faces which lend a strange dynamic rooted in painting. These take on more of a circus-like narrative, perhaps something akin to what the performers in Cirque du soleil would wear.

Throughout history facepaint has been practiced in wars, ceremonies, sports and entertainment. It’s mostly associated with the native Americans who used it to prepare for hunting, spiritual enlightenment and death. The different marks and colors appropriately symbolized what tribe they belonged to. (via artfucksme)

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Fred Tomaselli

Fred Tomaselli
Fred Tomaselli is best known for his highly detailed paintings on wood panels, combining an array of unorthodox materials suspended in a thick layer of clear, epoxy resin. He sees his paintings and their compendium of data as windows into a surreal, hallucinatory universe. “It is my ultimate aim”, he says, “to seduce and transport the viewer in to space of these pictures while simultaneously revealing the mechanics of that seduction.”

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Liu Bolin Is The Invisible Man

Chinese artist Liu Bolin doesn’t need to be in the spotlight at all times. He prefers to kick back and literally blend into his surroundings. Watch him as he disappears into piles of trash, various landscapes, and literally merges with buildings after the jump. 

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Mondrian Pong

 

 

Everyone loves a good Gift and I thought this Mondrian pong Gif is one of the more clever Gif’s i’ve found lately. Enjoy!
(via sfmoma)

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Modern Objects Made to Look Like 100 Year-Old Relics

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The work of artist Maico Akiba is almost a kind of future nostalgia.  Maico begins his work with commonplace objects such as electronics or clothing.  He alters the objects to appear as if they are 100 years old.  Rust and moss are taking over electronics while paint chips and peels away.  Although, the electronics look like relics, they are entirely functional.  Perhaps, this is how the future ruins of present day life will look.  They also serve as a comical type of existential reminder.

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Patrick Brennan

Recently stumbled across the work of Patrick Brennan by way of his most recent solo show @ HalseyMcKay. He provides a really fresh take on painting. Lots of interesting material decisions, color usage, and compositional arrangements. I dig it…more after the jump.

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jeremy blincoe Indigenous Australia

Beautifully executed  surreal photographs by Jeremy Blincoe create narratives focused on indigenous Australians.

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