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Judith G. Klausner’s Carved Oreo Cookie Portraits

Judith G. Klausner combines two of my favorite things, food and art in her Oreo Cameo series. Carving delicate portraits into the centers of Oreo cookies, Klausner’s gorgeous relief sculptures measure at only 2 inches in diameter and reference hand made crafts such as ancient placards or rare roman coins. (via 1 design per day)

 

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Niall McClelland’s Tie Die Ink Cartridge Paintings

 

Gorgeous tie dye paintings by Niall McClelland created by leaking printer ink cartridges on folded paper.

 

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Malaysian Artist Jun Ong Installs A Massive Glowing Star In A Five Story Building

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Malaysian artist Jun Ong has implanted a glowing star within an unfinished five story building in the town of Butterworth, Malaysia. The awkward confinement of the large luminescent sculpture within the otherwise gaping desolate space offers an air of confusion. Almost as if the star was there by mistake, perhaps stuck. The installation was indeed informed by a notion of error — the star seems to mimic a glitch. Metaphorically, this “glitch star” represents the state of Butterworth. The town, which was once an prosperous industrial port linking the mainland and island, now finds itself desolate and suffering from decentralization. The twelve sided star, spanning over the the full five floors of the building, is comprised of five hundred meters of steel cables and LED strips. The piece is created in fragments, as it is divided by the floors of the concrete structure. When entering the installation, the viewer is forced to experience each floor as its own unit, creating a multi-faceted adventure. Each floor is an experience of just a mere piece of the whole, perhaps alluding to the overarching disposition of the town itself. However, despite the installation’s “gltich” reminiscent quality and fractured formation, the star is wondrous and uplifting. The project, presented as a part of the Urban Xchange Festival, was curated by Eeyan Chauh and Gabija Grusaite of Hin Bus Depot Art Center. (via designboom)

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Stephen Silk

Stephen Silk began practicing gyotaku in 2008. Gyotaku is a Japanese printing method that uses actual fish to make art. Ink or paint is rubbed on the fish allowing an incredibly textured print directly onto the paper. The lumped paint and palette match the New Hampshire coastal seascapes in oil fusing a really cohesive collection completely reflective of the area and its subjects. 

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Cats Posing Like Pin-Up Girls

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If you feature cats, they will come. That’s what Australian marketing executive, Rach Aslett discovered when she created the Tumblr titled Cats That Look Like Pin Up Girls. The original intention was to promote a Hurly Burly, a new rockabilly fashion shop, but transcended into viral popularity because of the amusing fact that cuddly cats were paired alongside busty vintage pinups.

Based on the signature on the works, some of the illustrations seen here by the legendary artist Gil Elvgren, who produced these iconic works between the 1930’s and early 1970’s. They represent a facet commercial art that was popular during this time, and one that set a standard for pin up girl illustrations today.Of course, when combined with the pictures of cats, it takes them from serious-yet-cheeky art to something that’s just silly. The ridiculous poses of a kitten or hairless feline undermine the sexiness that these would have been otherwise. While this Tumblr is not fine art, it’s no doubt amusing to look at.(Via Spiceytec)

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Yoan Capote’s Landscapes Made Of Thousands Of Fishhooks Illustrate The Complexities Of Life In Cuba

Yoan Capote - Painting

Yoan Capote - Painting

Yoan Capote - Painting

Yoan Capote - Painting

Cuba’s 3,570 mile coastline, nestled in the Caribbean Ocean has seen everything from glamorous vacation resorts to the horrors of revolution. But as Cuban artist, Yoan Capote shows us in his Isla (Island) series, the heart of Cuba is her relationship to the water.

Capote’s collection of canvases illustrate the beauty and turbulence of the sea. He says,

“the sea is an obsession for any island country .. it represents the seductiveness of dreams but at the same time danger and isolation.”

In the Isla series, Capote captures that feeling by utilizing fishhooks to create texture and density on his large canvases. At first glance, the works seem to be made of heavy oil but upon closer inspection you see that each wave in his ocean scape is an individual fishhook that has been painstakingly painted and nailed into place by Capote and his team. Layer after layer of fishhooks creates a physically dangerous work. If you aren’t careful, it could stab you. Capote says, “I wanted to use thousands of fishhooks to create a surface that would be almost tangible to the viewer upon their approach.” Accomplished.

The result of this intense work is not only the undulating motion of the sea, but it is a comment on Cuba’s situation, more generally. The fishhooks are a symbol of Cuba’s fishing trade and they illustrate its perilous borders but through this work Capote is also able to point to economic issues, emigration, and political isolation thus evoking a shared sense of uncertainty about the future of the country.

This collection can be seen at Ben Brown Fine Arts, London, until 29 January 2016.

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Nobody Notices Artist Lays Dead In A Public Park To Protest Michael Brown’s Killing

protest11protest12protest2In the wake of the murder of unarmed teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri by a policeman, and the subsequent protests of police brutality, tensions have been high among many communities. On Saturday August 16 in Philadelphia, artist activists draped yellow CAUTION ribbon around the iconic LOVE statue in Love Park and actor Keith Wallace positioned himself face-down in front of the statue, wearing a white t-shirt that appeared to be stained with blood, as if he were shot from behind. Standing near him, two people alternated the holding of a sign that read “Call Us By Our Names.” For an hour, Wallace lay in front of the emblematic, tourist-attracting statue – all the while, tourists continued to pose in front of the statue, usually while framing Wallace out of the photo, or blocking the view of his body in some way.

For Wallace, an idea like this had been brewing for quite some time. “I just tried to think about a way I could use my spirit of activism coupled with my artistic passion to make a statement about what’s going on. So I just decided that for me, I’m a very image-driven artist. I think images speak louder than words can, most times. And so there’s some value in forcing a society to look at the most ugly parts of itself and just putting it out there for them to examine and discussed, and to be disgusted by, in the hopes of provoking some sort of dialogue or provoking some social change in an effort to eradicate some social ill, whatever that is.”

The phrase “Call Us By Our Names” was born from the knowledge that though we know the names of victims like Michael Brown and Trayvon Martin, there are countless other victims of police brutality whose faces go unrecognized and unnamed. “I was tired,” Wallace says. “No, we’re NOT thugs, we’re not this, we’re not that. We’re unarmed citizens, so call us who we are. Call us by our names. Say ‘Michael Brown’ instead of ‘unarmed robbery suspect.’ When you give a face and a name to a victim, the public becomes socially responsible in a different way.”

According to Lee Edward Colston, a theater student who was helping with the protest, visitors to the statue expressed a variety of feelings and opinions. “There was an older white couple that wanted to take a picture in front of the LOVE statue,” recounts Colston. “The older white gentleman said, ‘Why do they have to shove their politics down our throats?’ The woman replied, ‘They’re black kids, honey. They don’t have anything better to do.'” In another account, Colston says, “There was one group of white guys who wanted to take a picture in front of the statue, but one of the guys in the group couldn’t take his eyes off of Keith’s body. His friends were trying to convince him to get in the picture. He told his friends, ‘Something about this doesn’t feel right, guys. I don’t think we should.’ One of his friends replied, ‘Dude, come on … he’s already dead.’ Then they all laughed.” Additionally, “There was a guy who yelled at us… ‘We need more dead like them. Yay for the white man!’

Colston did relate two more positive reactions to the performance. Recounting one, he says, “One young guy just cried and then gave me a hug and said ‘thank you. It’s nice to know SOMEBODY sees me.’” And in another, “There was a Latina woman with two young boys. She held her boys’ hands and said to them, ‘I want you to see this. This is important. Never be afraid to tell the truth.'”

Accompanying the silent protest, a sheet of paper was handed out that included information about rights and responsibilities, and a statement that partially reads, “I am racially charged not because I want to be, but because I have to be. I am racially charged because in certain instances, that hyper awareness may ensure that I make it home to my family at the end of the day. I am racially charged because I am not afforded the luxury to wander through life with my head in the (nonexistent) ‘post-racial America’ clouds. I see color because my color is seen, dismissed, devalued, and implicated as a threat everywhere I go. I am racially charged and if I make you uncomfortable by speaking out about it and calling attention to it, then I implore you to eradicate the ugliness I see every day in the world.” (via ra’s al ghul is dead, thinkprogress, philadelphia magazine)

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Kotryna Zukauskaite

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Kotryna Zukauskaite‘s mixed media collages contain a variety of playful compositions, layers, colors and textures. A mixture of portraits, drawings and abstract landscapes, Kotryna uses the many variety of mediums to portray dynamic illustrations.

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