Get Social:

Simon Schubert’s Eery Elegance

picture-12

Simon Schubert creates an austere brand of hauntingly elegant forms that remind me of the creepy twin scenes from The Shining, minus the oceans of blood-bath (though somehow, is simltaneously implied.) They straddle the realms of design, human and esoteric form, at home either in some avant-garde London hotel for millionaires or some strange fun house carnival.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Figurative Sculpture Made With Legos- Indoors and On the Street

 

These are real legos. Nathan Sawaya works with the popular toy to create large-scale figurative sculpture. Legos’ shatter-prone tendencies and the plastic material involved lend a fractured, modern quality to these. The cold geometry involved in each sculpture sets up a nice opportunity for reflection, and Sawaya’s emotional posing of the figures spurs even further questioning.

But the sculptures  work just as well when taken at face value: legos were, and are a lot of fun to play with.

Lately, Sawaya’s been placing 15-inch “Hugmen” in various public spaces (see above), adding a little love to the daily grind. Click past the jump for more lego sculpture.

Photos courtesy of the artist and Erica Ann.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Alain Delorme

totems03 Looking at French photographer Alain Delorme’s Totems is almost surreal.  It is so hard to believe that a single person can manage to carry all of these formations in such large quantities by themselves and only a bike.  It is almost unbelievable.  Photoshop or not, the atmosphere in which this is happening in  comparison to  the rest of the world is art in itself.

Currently Trending

Chris Dent

1_newyorknewyork600 

Chris Dents‘ illustrations on architecture explore the modern metropolis. His unique pen style shows the energy of the city through intricate and detailed drawings.

Currently Trending

Kimberly Brooks At Taylor De Cordoba

In her latest body of work, Kimberly Brooks continues to explore portraiture, specifically the complexities of representations of female identities. While in her previous series, including Mom’s Friends (2007) and The Stylist Project (2010), the artist used figures to construct narratives, here the female form is part of a broader abstracted landscape. And while earlier portraits boasted an uncanny likeness to their subjects, Brooks’ style has shifted into something that is simultaneously looser and richer. Facial features have been abstracted and bodies distorted. Fashion and costume, a longtime theme for Brooks, is also deconstructed. Once painstakingly rendered folds and drapes have been reduced to their essential shapes and color fields. In these sumptuous new images, Brooks continues to address questions about how we frame beauty, and the phenomenon of fashion as a both pop culture and artistic touchstone.   Taken as a whole, the new paintings create a meta-narrative that contemplates “threads” that define, unite and separate us across different cultures and eras.\

Make sure to catch Kimberly Brooks’ third solo show currently on view at Taylor De Cordoba through October 22nd.

Currently Trending

Abstract ‘Paintings’ Made From Coogi Sweaters

Jayson Musson painting1 Jayson Musson painting3

Jayson Musson painting6

The abstract ‘paintings’ by artist Jayson Musson (also known by his alter-ego Hennessy Youngman) are created from piecing together Coogi sweaters, a brand of sweater popular in the late 1980’s and early 90’s.  The sweaters carry especially specific associations – Clifford Huxtable of the TV sitcom the Cosby Show or the rapper Notorious B.I.G.  However, the sweaters are also known for a specific style that lends itself well to abstract art.  Musson elaborates:

“The thing I found most alluring about Coogi sweaters was how painterly they were. They seemingly lingered on the borders of gestural abstraction. I made the joke, “That Coogi looks like a Pollock”. Over the course of the following weeks, I began collecting images of the sweaters, studying their composition. They seemed to defy the traditional logic of the textile, opting instead to appear spontaneous and created by hand rather than machine-made. Each sweater, though a manufactured object seemed to seek its own authenticity.” [via]

Currently Trending

Andy Warhol And Four Other Artists Who Make Art With Balloons

Andy Warhol "Silver Clouds"

Andy Warhol “Silver Clouds”

Choi Jeong Hwa "Life/Life"

Choi Jeong Hwa “Life/Life”

William Forsythe "Scattered Crowd"

William Forsythe “Scattered Crowd”

SpY, "balloon boy"

SpY, “balloon boy”

Andy Warhol’s Silver Clouds is probably one of the best-known balloon installations. Silver Clouds was first created with the help of engineer Billy Klüver and incorporated into other works, such as Merce Cunningham’s 1968 Rainforest.  Re-made many times since its first installment, the mercurial piece is a favorite of many.

German choreographer William Forsythe created an amazing installation called Scattered Crowd that consisted of thousands of white balloons.  Seeking to reflect the concept of human decision, Forsythe wanted visitors to consider how they chose to maneuver through the piece.

Madrid-based street artist, SpY has been creating urban interventions for over two decades.  His “balloon boy” is both humorous and surprising.

First created in 1998 and re-created several times Half the Air in a Given Space by Martin Creed is comprised of thousands of balloons.  Always the same color, the installation is mean to be clever, fun and interactive.

South Korean artist Choi Jeong Hwa created an installation called Life/Life, consisting of over 10,000 balloons at Gallery Central in Australia.  The beautiful installation was made all the more powerful for its ephemeral nature.

Currently Trending

Armando Veve

Armando Veve’s stippled drawings take you to microscopic forgotten worlds.

Currently Trending