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Sarah McNeil Is Cute N’ Cuddly

Some artists just have a way with drawing. Each line is exquisitely placed on the paper with the most delicate ease as if it had always been there. Sarah McNeil’s drawings do just that. Her marks are so refined and gentle that they can even make a skull with a mustache and a cat tumbler look cute.

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Klaas Van der Linden

Klaas Van der Linden
Mysteriously dark images from Belgian artist Klaas Van der Linden. Almost all his paintings are set against a black background, and many are self-portraits. The obscured nature of this work reminds me a little bit of paintings by German artist Henning Kles.

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Dynamic Artists Join Forces To Create A Hybrid Series Of Disfigured Faces

Derek Albeck and Grady Gordon - Graphite and Monotype Derek Albeck and Grady Gordon - Graphite and Monotype

When two great artists come together with completely different styles, amazing things can happen. Artists Grady Gordon and Derek Albeck have come together to create a collaborative series in which Gordon starts one of their artworks, and Albeck will finish it. Both artists working in graphite, their work fits together naturally. However, there solo work provides a stark contrast to each other’s styles. Gordon often works in monotype, creating his pigment from ground up cow bones. His organic, abstract techniques could not be more different than his collaborator. Albeck’s work is exceptionally detailed, rendering photorealistic drawings with graphite. When you mix these two opposite methods of creating art together, the results are incredibly unique.

When Gordan and Albeck join forces, their work becomes a hybrid series of morphing, deformed faces that are not of this world. These highly expressive faces are missing many parts such as eyes, a nose, or a mouth at some times. Even the hand that is included in this series appears to have contorting fingers and twisted bones. The winding line work confuses our perception until we cannot tell which end is which, or even, which part is the inside or the outside of the head. You can see this captivating series at the exhibition Sometimes I See You Look At Me Like That at The Smoking Nun Gallery in San Francisco, Califonrnia. You don’t want to miss it, as it ends next month on July 17th.

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The Street Art (Literally On-the-Street Art) Of Roadsworth

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Roadsworth street art1

The subtly subversive work of artist Roadsworth fits well in the long history of street art.  However, rather than finding his art on the wall, you’ll need to look down.  Roadsworth, as his name suggests, sticks to asphalt.  Making slight additions with paint to the language of road symbols, Roadsworth provides drivers and pedestrians alike with brain-interruptions for the morning commute.  Roadsworth explains:

“The ubiquitousness of the asphalt road and the utilitarian sterility of the “language” of road markings provided fertile ground for a form of subversion that I found irresistible. I was provoked by a desire to jolt the driver from his impassive and linear gaze and give the more slow-moving pedestrian pause for reflection. The humourlessness of the language of the road not to mention what I consider an absurd reverence for the road and “car culture” in general made for an easy form of satire.” [via]

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Alex Da Corte’s Dollar Store Art

Alex Da Corte is an artist who makes incredible sculptures and images out of what looks to be the items he finds in the dollar store. They’re reminiscent of Daniel Eatock‘s sculptures, but  with more of a fine-arts bend as opposed to Eatock’s design/humor approach. Not that Eatock isn’t a serious artist, or Da Corte is humorless, they’re just two ways of interacting with similar materials, both of which produced phenomenal results.  Rozalia Jovanovic gives a great description for the Gallerist:

“Mr. Da Corte’s work revisits the objects and fascinations we’ve left behind by using low-cost items the way Jim Hodges uses bodily fluids. However, while Mr. Da Corte references Abjection, and artists like Mr. Hodges and Eva Hesse, the approach is different.

“It’s kind of that romanticism with objects,” said Mr. Sheftel, “but in a different way. Rather than bodily fluids, [Mr. Da Corte’s] looking at things like shampoo. Shampoo is a really intimate substance. We put it on our bodies, it seeps into us. It gets under our skin. So it’s not really abjection, but it’s related—it looks at the things that are close to us now. It’s a different conversation when Alex is going to the dollar store in Philly and using that as his art supply store and looking at off-brand soda, shampoo, and low-level items that engage in a conversation about class and race.”

“I am attracted to these items for their accessibility,” Mr. Da Corte told Gallerist via email. “Despite their common place, they offer promises of escape and pleasure through smell, color and texture. Framing shampoo, removes its utility, allowing me to reconsider it as a voyeur and scientist.”

Mr. Da Corte’s upbringing also heavily informs his work. “There’s a Philly bent too, I think,” said Mr. Sheftel. “Looking in Fishtown, Philadelphia. He grew up in Camden and went to Philly for school.” Mr. Da Corte, who divides his time between New York and Philadelphia has an upcoming solo presentation at its Institute of Contemporary Art.”- Gallerist NY (via)

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Awesome Video Of The Day:

Sometimes when I’m sitting real still at my desk staring into the sky this video is secretly playing in my head.

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Andreas Lie’s Double Exposures Fuse Animals With Idyllic Landscapes

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Norwegian artist Andreas Lie fuses wild creatures with landscapes in a subtle collection of animal portraiture. Using two different photographic images, he creates a double exposure where woods, water, mountains, and even the Northern Lights are contained within the bodies of beasts. Polar bears, foxes, and wolves are all featured, and their torsos become one with the ground.

The textures of trees (like evergreens) often works in Lie’s favor. It mimics the look of fur so while these images are undoubtedly surreal, they also look natural. And, that’s part of their appeal. They combine visually disparate elements of the natural world in a way that’s aesthetically pleasing. It comes in a nice, animal-shaped package.

Lie sells his work via Society6. Check it out for prints, clocks, tote bags, and more. (Via Blu)

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Samuel François’s Simple Offerings

Samuel François’s site features a variety of art in various mediums. However my favorite part is his simple outdoor installs and alterations. Some of his alterations would stop you dead in your tracks while others will take years to discover.

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