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Arnaud Lajeunie Dyes The Color Of Ocean Waves In His Mesmerizing Photographs

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Often in our daily lives, something needs to be taken out of it’s normal context to be seen with renewed appreciation. In Arnaud Lajeunie‘s recent photoseries  Water meets colour, colour meets water, the Paris-based photographer explores new waves of seeing the constant ebb and flow of ocean waves by making them more visible, through the use of biodegradable, sugar-based dyes. Arnaud’s interventions tint the surging water with a plethora of colors, which are captured using an extremely fast shutter speed, which produces photos of violent, colorful takes of traditional landscape photography. Taken out of a normal context, one can see more clearly the natural beauty and fury. Says Arnaud, “Here, colour is seen as a raw material, as are the waves and the rocks. Colour adds density and thickness to transparent water, thus enhancing the flux fixation process.”

As writer Eugenia Lapteva notes in an essay on the series, Colours of Absence, “As the colours bleed into the sea, the texture of the water thickens and the motion of the waves is (re)defined, revealing its hidden course and complex networks. The crashing waves, which are carefully contained within the camera frame, pull the viewer into a vortex of frozen shapes and novel configurations that are otherwise indiscernible to the human eye.”

In his own words, the photographer explains, “I rely on the camera as a device with technical features that can give tangible shapes to ever-moving fluxes, in this case the waves. The high shutter speed transcends the human reflex of persistence of vision: it reveals existing shapes that the ‘mortal eye’ cannot perceive on its own.” (via mymodernmet)

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Holton Rower’s Poured Paintings

I’m more interested in Holton Rower’s process of creating these abstract paintings than the final result. Sure the end result is beautiful but you’ll see what I mean once you watch the process video after the jump. It’s a simple technique that packs a lot of punch!

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Playful Installations Offer New Perspectives

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Artist Katrin Sigurdardottir offers unexpected perspectives by way of her installations.  For this first installation High Plane, Sigurdardottir set up two ladders in the gallery for visitors to climb.  The ladders lead to a hole for the visitors to insert their heads.  Once visitors peek through the holes they see they are at eye level with a miniature landscape.  Pale blue islands seem to dot a white sea, the visitor looking from god-like perspective.  However, the viewer also encounters another viewer peering through the other hole, reminded of their absurd size and situation.  In another installation titled Boiserie, she sets up an entirely white parlor-type room adorned with period furnitutre.  Mirrors mark the corners of the room which create an endless loop of reflections of the rooms interior.  The mirrors, though, are interrogation mirrors visitors can use to look inside the room.  The parlor is essentially only a set and roughly hewn from the outside.

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Carrie Schneider’s Photographs

Chicago and Brooklyn based photographer Carrie Schneider’s ambiguously complex narratives.

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David Redon Combines Famous Musicians With Vintage Advertisements

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David Redon makes vintage popular culture look new by adding celebrities. The art director at Parisian agency Quai Des Orfèvres combines famous people like Kanye, Beyonce,  and Pharrell with Mid-Century advertisements in a series he calls Ads Libitum. We see them endorsing soap, make up, toothpaste, and drive-in restaurants, all having been Photoshopped to fit in with the look and feel of the past.

Redon explains to Adweek why he crafts these remixes, stating, “I like the shift between vintage and modern pop culture, because these days the border between art and commercial is very small, and artists work their images like brands do.”  It’s true. Kanye definitely cultivates a specific persona that is polarizing and it’s part of how he sells himself. Pharrell, on the hand, markets himself as a happy-go-lucky likable guy, which makes him more family-friendly with wider appeal.

Ads Libitum is primarily American marketing and culture through the eyes of a non-American. Redon makes some interesting choices on celebrity and advertising pairings. Nirvana, for instance, seems a little outdated, as does Michael Jackson, but to someone who’s an outsider, these people are an icon of music in the United States. (Via Adweek)

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Craig Maher’s Sci-Fi Fantasy

Craig Maher is an illustrator who works primarily for Sci-Fi clients such as Magic The Gathering and other role playing games that you’d find nerdy kids playing in poorly lit basements. Not all of his work is my cup of tea but in a small section of his site I found some amazing gems to share with you. Ironically enough all of the paintings in this section were Craig’s unpublished works. Go figure.

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Jeremy Geddes

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Jeremy Geddes
is an incredibly cinematic painter. His realistically painted images offer an overwhelming amount of drama through the use of not just aesthetic composition and image, but through concept as well. His recent series feature an astronaut exploring Earth. It’s creatures, buildings, landscapes, etc. Hinting towards the idea of the human alienation within our own environment.

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Uncanny Photographs Explore The Aging Human Body

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For her undergraduate project Young and Old, the freshman photographer Kelsey Duff photographed two models: the first is 18, and the second is 65. By excluding her subjects’ faces from her close frame, she catalogs the aging process as it might apply to an everywoman figure; despite trademark tattoos and painted toenails, each woman is stripped of clothing and other common markers of individual identity. Avoiding the impulse to capture moments of conventional portraiture, she shoots isolated sections of each woman with an imaginative fascination, pulling apart the body and fixing each piece within precise borders.

Despite its repetitive and almost anthropological vantage point, Duff’s camera work avoids any sense of coldness or sterility. The choice of warm natural lighting imbues the series with a romance that highlights tone and shadow. As if the subject of a yellow-filled Baroque landscape, the three-dimensional erosion of flesh through stretch marks, scars, pores, and wrinkles are dramatically and reverently seen. Even the clothing change from black skivvies to white underthings reads as part of a years’ old fading process.

The ever-present backdrop of shifting daylight and plain white bed sheets serve to visually condense years into a single dawn or dusk; as Duff follows her visual narrative, the time-lapse between her two subjects flattens, forming a poignantly timeless archive of the evolution of the female body. Caught at two poles of the same lifetime, young and old woman engage in a physical dialogue, exploring beauty and eternity hand-in-hand. Take a look. (via BUST)

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