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French Night Clubs In The Daylight Look Less Impressive and More Sad

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Art director, designer, and photographer Francois Prost captures the exteriors of french night clubs in his series After Party. There’s a twist to these straightforward compositions, and it’s that they are all pictures taken the in the daylight, where the glitz is non-existent. It’s safe to say that they are significantly less impressive places in the afternoon. Instead of of neon lights and gaggles of beautiful people, they are abandoned-looking, desolate buildings that show their age.

We see a lot of faux features at these clubs, like fake palm trees, sphinxes, and even an Acropolis. It’s all meant to create a fantasy and make the guests feel like they’ve been transported from their normal lives and into some glamorous one. Of course, without the aid of the dark and flashing lights, the buildings are dilapidated and out of place. If you’re a club goer, it’s probably best to avoid them during work hours to preserve their intended effect. (Via It’s Nice That)

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Visual Uncertainty: Photographer Chloe Newman’s Uncanny Juxtapositions Of Body Parts And Consumer Goods

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Chloe Newman is a London-based photographer whose bright, surrealist imagery juxtaposes body parts with objects in the creation of uncanny visual puzzles that are rich with analyses of popular culture and consumerism. Two of her series are featured here: Visual Conflicts and Black Tropicana (in collaboration with Rebecca Scheinberg). The former — characterized by hands and feet interacting strangely with edible materials — triggers curiosity and also challenges the way we see food, giving it a commodified (and sometimes an oddly fetishized) object-status. Black Tropicana, which was “inspired by pop culture, 70s glam disco, and artificial worlds” (Source), similarly turns glamorized objects — acrylic nails, jewelry, and cocktails — into attractive but superficial representations of themselves.

With simple compositions and eye-grabbing colors, Newman’s works initially resemble the fashion advertisements you’d find in a magazine. But such staged product marketing is the very thing she seeks to critique in her work, and she does so by confronting us with their constructed absurdity; whether it is acid-bright nails clinging a fistful of jewels, syrup being poured over a bouquet of white roses, or a lobster about to be devoured over gold satin sheets, her unusual images unveil such magazine ads as contrived, hyper-real depictions of objects that have been attributed a certain “status” in our consumer culture. Critical analysis aside, the power of Newman’s photography lies in the fact that it simply intrigues us — we are attracted to the image, but also unsettled by it, unsure of what it is supposed to represent. An encounter with her work becomes an enjoyable mental interrogation.

Visit Newman’s webpage to see more of her work, including a similarly surreal series called End of Genesis. More “visual uncertainties” after the jump.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Train Logger


20 minutes of psychedelic clay animation bliss courtesy of Nicos Livesey

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Laurie Lipton Draws Epic and Meticulous Fantastical Dystopian Worlds

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Los Angeles based artist Laurie Lipton draws fantastical worlds built of dystopian technology and waste. Her recent work, which she refers to as Techno Rococo, explores “society’s relationship to technology and how it’s uniting us while simultaneously disconnecting everyone from each other.” Her epic, painstakingly detailed drawings are giant, allowing the viewer to fully enter them — Lipton’s work is not just a vision, its an experience. Lipton explains her unique style; “it was all abstract and conceptual art when I attended university. My teachers told me that figurative art went ‘out’ in the Middle Ages and that I should express myself using form and shapes, but plashes on canvas and rocks on the floor bored me. I knew what I wanted: I wanted to create something no one has ever seen before, something that was brewing in the back on my brain.” Originally inspired by the Flemish School of painting, Lipton developed her drawing style based on traditional egg tempera techniques of creating depth through a meticulous process of cross hatching. Using only charcoal and pencil on paper, her black and white work, despite its futuristic content, aims to hint at a sense of classicism. She states, “I used to sit for hours in the library copying Durer, Memling, Van Eyck, Goya and Rembrandt. The photographer, Diane Arbus, was another of my inspirations. Her use of black and white hit me at the core of my Being. Black and white is the color of accent photographs and told TV shows…it is the color of ghosts, longing, time passing, memory, and madness. Black and white ached. I realized that it was perfect for the imagery in my work.” (via Hi Fructose)

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Enrico Ferrarini’s Takes Traditional Sculpture To Its Digital Conclusion

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Italian artist Enrico Ferrarini builds upon the famous art history of his country, quite literally,  in his unique style which takes traditional sculpture to its digital conclusion. By carving and casting sculptures and then creating multiples of them, Ferrrani combined them, bring a glitched, modernly repetitive styling to time-honored sculpting methods.

The Moderna, Italy-born artist has studied at the Florence Academy of Fine Arts (where some of the most famous sculptures of all time, including Donatello and Michelangelo’s Davids reside), and employs methods of sculpture which are not typically learned by today’s artists. Perhaps that is why his work has a deeper resonance; employing the methods of the past to work with the styling of today. (via myampgoesto11)

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Pink Ladies: Melchor Bocanegra’s Candy-Colored Portraits Explore Playful Aesthetics And Hidden Sadness

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Melchor Bocanegra is a digital designer based out of Salamanca, a city located in the Mexican state of Guanajuato. His work is characterized by portraiture mixed with candy-cream absurdity; his subjects are usually set against empty or washed-out backdrops, acting out expressions of play or alarm. He often incorporates surrealist elements, such as thick tears or fluorescent goop smeared across their faces. Despite the innocent colors and fun compositions, Bocanegra’s images grab our attention with their discreetly unsettling aspects; in the following statement provided to Beautiful/Decay, he describes his style and explains how he seeks to convey conflicting emotions:

“I always work with portrait and I really like to mix feelings of isolation and melancholy with colorful and friendly aesthetics. I use simple compositions, trying to focus on the expression and emotion of the character. I could say that I try to create portraits with a passive/aggressive hidden sadness.”

Featured here is his Pink Ladies series, which present us with a cast of pastel-hued characters in various ambivalent and bizarre poses. The underlying themes in these images explore insincerity and idealized femininity, blending sexualized elements with the symptoms of banality; combined with the models’ superficial expressions, the fake tears, exposed breasts, and over-the-top makeup and jewelry convey a sense of exhaustion and meaninglessness. There is also the sense of loss, a grief over something that went missing during the transition into commercialized, sexualized adulthood. As Bocanegra explains, “[these] images create messages or questions about insincerity; with gestures of concern and ambiguity, we discover symbols of the unattainable, a longing for something we do not know or barely remember.”

Visit Bocanegra’s website, Instagram, and Facebook page to learn more.

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Your Spectacular Outdoor Photography Could Win You $15,000!

Weather Channel photo contestWeather Channel photo contest Weather Channel photo contest Weather Channel photo contestThe Weather Channel and Toyota have come together once again for their second annual photo contest to find the most beautiful, provocative, and jaw dropping photographs in their “It’s Amazing Out There” competition. Both amateur and professional photographers are invited to submit their most spectacular images that best depict the wonder, impact, and beauty of mother nature.

The Weather Channel recognizes that “weather” is so much more than the forecast or even weather elements. With that in mind they are asking talented photographers (that’s you!) from all over the US to submit works that fall under the categories of nature, adventure and/or the elements. The first prize is a whopping $15,000 with a second prize of $5,000, and third prize of $1,000. That’s a lot of lenses and photo paper so don’t pass up this opportunity to share your work with the world and win some much deserved money for your artistic efforts.

The deadline for the “It’s Amazing Out There” contest is July 16th at noon ET.  Read the complete rules HERE And enter your photograph HERE.

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Fede Yankelevich

darky fede yankelevichSpanish illustrator Fede Yankelevich has been creating some pretty awesome work. Although I can’t seem to find much information on him, he is quite the talented guy and the work speaks for itself.

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