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Steve Nishimoto’s Abstract Magnifications

Steve Nishimoto lives and works in New York. He creates large pieces that approach abstract painting with a sense of humor. His paintings frequently examine modern subject matter such as the anonymous character featured on the display of generic ATM machines spread throughout the city or the word “Time” written as if it were a CAPTCHA on the internet. Another trademark is his magnification of the mundane and overlooked, from the security patterns within envelopes to 99 Cent Store tags Nishimoto reminds the viewer that anything can inspire.      

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Cynthia Ona Innis

Cynthia Ona Innis, Painting

Cynthia Ona Innis‘ paintings are explorations between the relationships of, “the healthy/sick, sublime, wet/dry, sexual, growth/rot, stiff/limp/squishy, thriving and failure that are the fragile properties of the body and nature.” These abstract explorations and relationships are represented in a mixture of blobs of colors, shapes, lines, composition and space. As she herself mentions, she has a great interest in organic forms that can be seen represented through colors chosen and shapes.

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Network Osaka

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Network Osaka is a graphic designer. That’s pretty much all I know about him or her. I don’t think they’re from Japan. They’re either from California or Mexico. Past that, Network Osaka has done some really nice print work, often employing a straightforward modernist aesthetic without seeming too derivative of the old masters.

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David Bayus’s Cosmic Paint

San Francisco based painter David Bayus creates beautiful mixed media collages.

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Marcello Velho’s Graphic Kingdom

I’m really enjoying the bit mapped illustrations and designs of Marcello Velho A.K.A Kingdom. His stacked illustrations look like unexplored levels of 1980’s video games that one would play while taking massive amounts of acid.

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Shawn Smith’s Pixelated Sculptures

Shawn Smith’s sculptures investigate the slippery intersection between the digital world and reality. Specifically Shawn is interested in how we experience nature through technology. When we see images of nature on TV or on a computer screen, we feel that we are seeing nature but we are really only seeing patterns of pixilated light.

For the past few years, Smith has been creating a series of “Re-things.” These whimsical sculptures represent pixilated animals and objects of nature. Finding images of his subjects online,  he creates three-dimensional sculptural representations of these two-dimensional images.  By building his “Re-things” pixel by pixel Shawn hopes to understand how each pixel plays a crucial role in the identity of an object. Through the process of pixilation, color is distilled, some bits of information are lost, and the form is abstracted. Making the intangible tangible, Smith views his building process as an experiment in alchemy, using man-made composite and recycled materials to represent natural forms.

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Starkly Graceful Black And White Photos Of Icebergs

Jan Erik Waider photography9 icebergs

Jan Erik Waider icebergs

Jan Erik Waider photography8 icebergs

The photographs of Jan Erik Waider seem to turn natural formations into abstract sculptures.  His series Ice on Black captures icebergs in stark black and white photography.  The textures, movement, and shape of the floating ice is surprisingly sculptural.  The graceful masses of ice juxtaposed against the larger field of open sea nearly seem like a painterly decision.  Waider is a graphic designer by trade, but his passion if for photography and the northern landscape.  He specifically captures the majority of his photographs in and near Greenland and Iceland.

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Alex Gibbs’ Comic Bleakness

Alex Gibbs is an English artist whose paintings and drawings are equal parts despairing and funny. I love his mix of patterns, graphic contours, and all-over narratives–sex on a couch in a party room with a man huddled and crying; dancing by yourself in a room filled with big floral prints; a (presumably) dead couple holding hands in airplane seats surrounded by puzzle-like pieces of their airplane. His work doesn’t make light of human tragedy per-se, it just gives it a little perspective by flattening us into the shapes and patterns of the world we live in, relishing in the absurdity of our perceptions. ( via )

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