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Mathematical and Generative Graphics by Tom Beddard

3D Mandelbulb Ray Tracer by Tom Beddard

Tom Beddard plays around with home-brew programmes that can generate interesting pictures and are interactive nature. He also does what any good open-source artist does: offer the source-code for download. This particular project (result of “true fractal structure in three dimensions”, which renders out to look like a couple thousand year’s worth of exquisite pottery study) is called the 3D Mandelbulb Ray Tracer. So if you’re feeling a bit like foraying into “graphical-geekery”, go check out Tom’s site and code!

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Daniel SCHLIER

I’m loving these works by Daniel Schlier on the Galerie Jean Brolly site. His grotesque collaged figures meld different painting techniques, materials, and disparate colors seamlessly with ease.  I just wish I could read French or find more info on him and his work.

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Noam Rappaport at Ratio 3

Noam Rappaport lives and works in Los Angeles. He has just opened his first West Coast solo exhibition at Ratio 3 in San Francisco. Rappaport’s minimal structures are at once slight and commanding, often relying on negative space to complete visual metaphors. The walls behind his pieces are simultaneously backround to and an integral part of the work. The show runs through March 23rd.  From the press release: “This exhibition will feature a series of new works which simultaneously reside between painting, sculpture, assemblage, and drawing. One predominant motif within Rappaport’s work is the representation of image through minimal compositions, color, and mark making. With Rappaport’s discerning use of simplified geometric shapes and refined color palates, the compositions reflect elements of the human form, landscape, and architecture. This suggestion of imagery is balanced with concepts of objecthood as expressed through constructions of commonplace materials and shaped canvases. The peripheries of these objects become the focus as color fields divide the shallow relief canvases, aluminum sheets drape over the edge of plywood panels and graphic lines appear to float in front of the surface.

These hybrid painting supports create a physical and perceptual relationship to the viewer. Negative spaces and blocks of color begin to suggest doorways, windows, and various characteristics that mirror the human figure. The attention to the space between the viewer and the work reinforces the idea that not only does a viewer look but he or she is also looked upon to play an active role in the object’s function.”

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Skulls, Aliens And Beetles: Enter The Demonic Monochromatic Characters Of Danny van Rynswyk

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Artist Danny van Rynswyk’s latest work is a series of captivating digital paintings and three dimensional painted sculptures reminiscent of Victorian era portraits Skulls, Aliens and Beetles: Enter The Demonic Monochromatic Characters of Danny van Rynswyk and curio shop items. They are all monochromatic and depict a series of moody characters in contemplative stances. They are all dressed in Victorian era clothing and are sometimes sporting rabbit or demon masks which add to their eerie masquerade. His characters also have disturbingly childlike traits which add to the odd atmosphere of his project. His work is both beautiful and grotesque and in many ways inspired by the surreal and the deep, dark corners of the imagination.

He creates his work with the help of 3D software, which allows him to combine fine art and technology. He paints the sculptures by hand and, as a finishing touch, places them under antique glass domes, which add to the curio shop aspect of his work. The glass domes also add to magic of his pieces and make them look like precious collector’s items.

Van Rynswyk’s abundant use of skulls, gothic imagery and wide eyed characters reminds one of Tim Burton. The shadows in his work are purely German Expressionist in the way that they are painted, and play off an absence of light in order to create a stonger atmosphere. His work is the stuff of dreams and nightmares, anatomy and science fiction and it allows the audience to create narratives surrounding his peculiar characters.

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Sponsored Post: Madeline Hagy’s Eye-Catching Format Portfolio Showcases Her Boldly Bizarre Illustrations And Collages

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madeline-hagy-format-portfolio-3We discovered Madeline Hagy and her boldly bizarre work on Format’s Spotlight page. Her portfolio elegantly displays her variety of work, from collages and illustrations to posters and prints. With her hallucinogenic forms and intriguing (and oft-grotesque) combinations of images, the clean and minimalist theme provided by the portfolio-building website Format is vital in showcasing the audacious complexity of Madeline’s work. With its fast-loading pages, Format is the perfect website for an artist’s portfolio, as you can scroll and view Madeline’s work without interruption. Another great feature that Format offers is the ability to sort work by category: you’ll notice you can view Madeline’s collages, sketchbook works, and prints separately.

Featured here are the works under the “collages” category, which provides an enticing sample of Madeline’s style and work. Among the images you’ll see a mash-up of recurring motifs, such as weeping eyes, raw meat, and deranged cartoon monsters. Adding to the series is a grotesque flavor of parody, mixing stylish, high fashion images with strange headwear, fleshless body parts, and googly eyes. In one way, Madeline’s work can be seen as a creative evolution of the magazine covers we disfigured with pens as children; going more in depth, we can read her collages as playful “dissections” that rearrange and distort magazine images to poke fun at the beauty industry. In either case, there is a lot to be seen and enjoyed on Madeline’s website, demonstrating that Format is the easiest way to make a portfolio that looks great and won’t distract from your work.

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Harrison Roberts Visits B/D

DSCN1995Say hello to Harrison Roberts. Harrison stopped by our offices to drop off his work for the upcoming Art Works Every Time exhibit. He was a bit flushed and out of breath – having lugged his pieces, many of them quite large, up several flights of stairs on a muggy Los Angeles afternoon – and then we made him pose for our camera! I’ve been admiring his collection of 2 and 3-dimensional works. They speak so boldly from afar but I can’t help inspecting them from very close in order to take in all the unexpected details; his concoctions speak equally well – albeit with altered voices – from both perspectives. You can see Harrison’s complete collection next Saturday, June 12th, at the Art Works Every Time opening reception at L.A.’s Synchronicity Gallery. Thanks Harrison!

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MARGIE LIVINGSTON Drips, Drops, Strips, And Skins

Margie Livingston’s work articulates the interaction between the architectural grid and the natural, organic world. Based on three–dimensional models that she builds in the studio, her paintings directly translate the phenomena of space, light, color and gravity upon these hybrid structures into lines and bands of color that hang seemingly suspended in space. Now, letting accident and discovery meet invention and experimentation, Livingston reverses her usual process, using paint to construct objects. Her new paint objects—built entirely from dots, strips, and skins of dried acrylic pigment investigate the properties of paint pushed into three dimensions and offer a compelling view into how the medium of paint can be used sculpturally. The sculpture featured above contains 62 layers of poured color going from dark to light.

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Incredible Moving Installations Created Out Of Cardboard

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Swiss Artist Zimoun creates sound sculptures and installation art that is a little bit strange. Equal parts raw, industrial materials; equal parts mechanical elements, he creates rooms full of what seem like living and breathing objects. He combines cardboard boxes, plastic bags, old furniture, packaging tape, wires, light tubes, cotton balls and motors to transform a space into something very unexpected.

His low-fi sound architecture follows on in John Cage’s footsteps, an artist he says he thought a lot about when he was younger. Zimoun explains his fascination with combining sound, strong visual elements and bringing obsolete technology to life:

I’m interested in a mix of living structures on the one hand, and control about decisions and details on the other. A combination of structures continuously generating or evolving by chance, chain reactions or other generative systems, and a specifically delimited and contained space in which these events are allowed to happen.

By drawing our attention to these often over-looked, or under-valued materials, Zimoun forces us to examine the nature in industrial materials, and the industrial in nature.
His sound sculptures are a combination of clean modernist structures, and the forces of chaos reacting against each other. We see how the patterns and rhythms of machines slowly change, the longer they are allowed to run. Like Cage, Zimoun allows a great deal of chance affect his work. He lets his mechanical sculptures run for an indeterminable amount of time, allowing the space to become a self-governing, organic space. Zimoun’s art very easily blurs the lines between nature and man/machine.

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