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Mark Jenkins’ Art Pushes Women Off Of Buildings

street art Sculpture

street art Sculpture

Mark Jenkins - Sculpture

Mark Jenkins’ sculptures occupy the uncanny valley. His work, in which he recreates the human body, places “people” into odd and often disturbing situations. Some of them are as fantastic as they are strange. One of the most interesting parts of Jenkins’ work is the way they are installed. His people are on the streets. They are life sized and dressed in conventional clothing, so they look as though they belong in the landscape. In reality, they don’t. His sculptures are standing in trash cans, on the edge of buildings, face first into a public fountain, and more.

Seeing Jenkins’ work amongst people is partially what makes it so successful. Seeing the reactions of others to these sculptures is both amusing and at times discerning. People walk by them as if they are nothing, as if they are completely normal. Sure, they stare at them, but they are never captured intervening on their behalf. Some, of course, aren’t believable. Others, like a woman stuck in a trashcan or laying on the top of the billboard would elicit some reaction. But, instead, she remains in the can.

The subversive nature of Jenkins’ installations is satisfying, especially if you are in on the joke and know it’s all fake. You could watch people for hours as they pass by, try and interact with the sculptures, and ultimately fail. The artist is taking the art outside the gallery and entering a world that combines art lovers and non-art lovers alike. (Via Hi Fructose)

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Aya Uekawa

Picture 4Picture 3

Aya Uekawa fuses the high realism of Dutch & Flemish Renaissance paintings with portraits of young women, often in states of dreamy transformation, straddling reality and fantasy.

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Happy America Day!

We’re taking the day off from blogging today to celebrate a lil place on earth called America. Sure we have some problems and our government is far from perfect but after living around the world I can honestly say that I’m proud to be part of our great nation. Having the freedom to say and do whatever we want is priceless so let us all take this day and appreciate our our home and make a commitment to make it even better. We’ll be hitting up the beach and eating way too much food (like any patriot) all day long but we’ll be back tomorrow with loads of posts and other goodies to keep you inspired and entertained!

 

 

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Erik Parker Paints Subversive, Psychedelic Visions In B/D’s Magazine About The “Public Enemy”

Erik Parker - PaintingErik Parker - PaintingErik Parker - Painting Erik Parker - Painting - B/D Issue O

Erik Parker is a German-born, New York-based artist who paints mashed-up characters in psychedelic landscapes; from graffiti, to comic books, to hip-hop, his work represents a synthesis of subculture that has taken on a rebellious life of its own. His work is part of Beautiful/Decay’s Issue O: “…Is the Public Enemy,” a magazine dedicated to artists who critique—through different mediums—mainstream structures. Other featured artists include Anthony Hernandez, a photographer who documented over 40 years of marginalized people and disregarded places in Los Angeles, as well as Imaad Wasif, a singer-songwriter whose passionate, eclectic style traverses the realms of folk and psychedelic/postmodern rock.

Parker’s approach to the “public enemy”—normative society—is to animate cultural expressions of dissonance into grotesquely expressive beings. Order is twisted into madness; human bodies are melted into sensation-filled lava pools of eyeballs, mouths, and viscera; and playful, biomorphic shapes swell into the suggestively sexual. In true graffiti style, many of Parker’s works include words resonating with rebellion and discontent, such as “rize,” “torn,” and “sink/swim.” With their amorphous and infinitely unpredictable shapes, Parker’s paintings signify a fluid form of resistance that undermines structures of constraint.

To learn more about Parker, check out B/D’s Issue O, which includes a feature-length interview with the artist. Limited copies can be purchased in our shop.

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Yee Jan Bao’s Distant Subjects

Yee Jan Bao‘s paintings are captures of things off in the distance surrounded by nothing but empty land or water. Almost like a mirage.

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Rainbow Monkey Markus Hofko

645_1229712823I’ve seen so much of this guy’s stuff around I wasn’t sure what to post. Nonetheless, he has so much to choose from!

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Larry Mantello’s Candy Coated World

Larry Mantello’s colorful sculptures are candy coated shrines to american pop culture. Bright colors, glossy finishes, and cheap imported materials remind us of why pop culture is so appealing and disgusting all at once.

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Slinkachu Reminds Us Of The Little Things In Life In His Photos Of A Miniature World

Slinkachu - Digital Photograph

Slinkachu - Digital Photograph

miniature installation

miniature installation

A person’s a person, no matter how small! Creating work under the name “Slinkachu,” this artist reminds us to pay attention to the little things in life in his miniature scenes. Photographed in London, Slinkachu constructs clever and irresistibly tiny scenes of people living their lives in the cracks of urban life. One small girl is swinging from a bent weed while other little people are diving off a Popsicle stick to swim in its melting juices. These photographs seem to capture a secret, pocket-sized world that exists right under our noses, reminding us to stop a while and take in our surroundings. This series also includes photographs of the little scenes in its real surroundings, giving it a sense of scale, revealing how small they really are.

These inch-high people are somewhat like the normal-sized urbanite, living in the shadows of tall buildings, just as Slinkachu’s people live in shadow. They are playing, swimming, and horseback riding in a concrete jungle, commenting on our own detachment from nature. However, this does not deter us from searching for it. We create our own nature in the form of city parks, just as Slinkachu’s playful little people find nature in a spilled soda pop, which they hop over like a pond. These hopeful scenes of miniature realities might criticize our separation from the natural world, but humorously point out our optimism and resourcefulness.

An exhibition of Slinkachu’s photographs titled Miniaturesque will be opening March 13th at Andipa Contemporary, located in London.

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