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Zemer Peled’s Beautiful Blooms Are Made Up Of Countless Shards Of Porcelain

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Israeli artist Zemer Peled creates sculptures using countless ceramic shards. Each individual element is a small part of a greater whole, and their sharp and pointed edges form a single beautiful form that’s inspired by flowers or sea creatures. Through careful arrangement, these forms bloom and breath like the real thing.

Peled uses blue cobalt found in designs and landscapes from traditional Japanese pottery as her raw materials. Subtle lines and patterns create the textures for flower petals and other attributes. To make this possible, the artist uses a slab roller to build sheets of clay that are fired and then broken with a hammer. What’s incredible is not only the meticulous nature of assembling and placing each piece, but its the uniformity that they all have. Although Peled’s work is comprised of countless parts, each of them is the same. (Via Colossal)

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Chris Labrooy’s playful 3D illustrations

I’m absolutely loving the 3D illustrations of Chris Labrooy with their dynamic sense of color, composition, and playful humor. If that’s not enough Labrooy also has a brilliant eye for typography, creating custom typefaces out of everything from people to architecture. (via)

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Roland Hicks’ Sticky Paintings

Roland Hicks’ hyperrealistic paintings of gum stuck to the bottoms of shoes is a perfect example of how any subject matter can be made interesting.

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Best Of 2012: Tom Deininger’s Junk Portraits and sculptures

I’m absolutely loving these explosive junk portraits and sculptures by Tom Deininger. Comprised of found objects each piece is created with various plastic and metal debris that the artist finds. The work reminds me a little of Vik Muniz but Tom still gets a pass in my book.

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Melting Polar Bear

Mark Coreth's melting polar bear

British sculptor Mark Coreth was sponsored by the WWF to create awareness on the subject of human impact on climate. The hunting polar bear has been standing standing proud in the Trafalgar Square’s Northern Terrace in London since last Friday the 11th. He will melt over the next 10 days, leaving a bronze skeleton, a pool of water and a powerful environmental message. If you’re in the area, please give Mr. Bear a sympathetic pet on the head. If you’re not in the area, you can watch his slow watery demise on a live feed (not completely sure if this works or not since everytime I’ve tried I’ve encountered technical difficulties.) Check out some not real-time vids of the sculptor and Mr. Bear’s daddy carving him out in the square after the jump.

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DethKills @ POVevolving Saturday Night!

In their inaugural unveiling, Dethkills will display 21 pieces that have been meticulously crafted over the past year. Each piece demonstrates their intricate and unconventional uses of “wet-in-wet” washes and dry brush technique, in conjunction with latex and acrylic paints.

This collection will display a group of works entitled “The 27 Club,” featuring iconic images of musicians and artists, such as Jimi Hendrix and Kurt Cobain, who were taken well before their time. Painted in the stark contrast of black and white, these legends are given new life.

The exhibition also includes a series of smaller works that illuminate the intricacies of everyday items, like a phone booth that you pass on your daily route or a box of your grandfather’s medals in the attic; relics of a not so distant, yet highly divergent, past.

The first 100 people at the exhibit will receive a handmade one-of-a-kind Dethkills photozine, with silk-screened cover and silk-screened insert, that showcases the process and progression of each piece in the show from beginning to end.

Opening Saturday November 13th 7-11pm

POVevolving Gallery
939 Chung King Road
Los Angeles, CA 90012
(310) 594-3036

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Dayna Thacker’s Meticulously Hand-Cut Terrain

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Informed by a mixture of science, geometry & mythology, the intentionality behind artist Dayna Thacker‘s layered landscapes lies in a quest for perfect methodology. She searches through informational systems, ancient patterns and mathematical equations for inspiration, seeking to find a connection between method and an elevated sense of inner peace. “Our inner and outer selves interact, inform and create the other: physical & spiritual, logical & intuitive, intellectual & psychological, conscious & subconscious,” she says.

Translating her research and interests to physical inquiry, Thacker develops intricate repeat patterns that she then hand-cuts into photographic investigations of landscape. The ritual, repeated nature of the cutting echoes aspects of her research process—one has to wonder if this mindful state is achieved in the making, or in the final viewing of these lace-like, multi-layered compositions.

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Kate Lacour’s Anatomical Drawings Gone Wild

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James Thurber said, “Humor is emotional chaos remembered in tranquility,” which seems to be a tactic comic artist and illustrator Kate (Ellen) Lacour has mastered in her recent drawing series Bodies, which she has only described with three words,  “body horror beauty.” The motives, inspiration, or goals behind the series have not been disclosed, yet appear to be a distinct side-project from her usual cartooning work, replacing a visually lighter style with a combination of human anatomical drawings found in textbooks. The results twist the familiar style of textbook, anatomical human renderings, creating drawings which utilize symmetry, unique and unusual body arrangements, and religious or spiritual iconography.

Symbolic poses are taken by transparent, headless bodies, such as the Lotus position, a pose with Hindu, Jain, and Buddhist relevance. Lacour (who perhaps tellingly also works as an art therapist) enhances this peaceful, evocative aesthetic by drawing lines with ink and pen but softly coloring the drawings in with food coloring. However, even with the emphasis of religious and anatomical text, the drawings evoke a humorous effect, replacing heads with comically screaming mouths and adding eyes to the Fallopian tubes of a levitating uterus. The most successful works are those which pack in detail, such as Devouring Mother (first drawing, above) where a creation myth entirely new is presented by mixing tales and traditions of the past. (via hi-fructose)

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