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Francois Robert Juxtaposes Bones And Symbols Of Violence And War

symbols of war symbols of war

symbols of war

symbols of war

Human bones, any bones, are signifiers of death, decay- in more poetic terms- the ephemerality of life.

Photographer Francois Robert uses the powerful symbolism that accompanies human bones to create ‘Stop the Violence’ – an eerie but important series of photographs that juxtaposes bones and iconic words/symbols that in some way or another have generated deaths and violence (i.e wars, rifles, handguns, 9/11, knives, the KKK,etc)

In my photographs, I use the human skeleton as the formal visual element, the subject of the image. In this manner, the skeleton is both the protagonist and antagonist (the Buddhist notion about, “the duality of man” seems apt).

For each photograph, the artists dissembles and rearranges the bones in order to reconfigure the elements to form what you see here.

I intend the images to plant the notion of restraint and charity in an effort to promote peace and tolerance.

 

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Jenn Mann’s Subconscious Vista

Jenn Mann taps into her subconscious where beautiful naked ladies climb geodes and man lives harmoniously with our flying feathered friends in the sky.

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Hao Ni

I love Hao Ni’s stacked sculptures and drawings of dilapidated houses.

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Graziano Locatelli’s Sculptures Emerge From Beneath The Walls

 Sculpture

tile Sculpture

Sculpture

Graziano Locatelli - Sculpture

Graziano Locatelli creates mixed-media artwork out of humble materials: tiles, cement, glue, and metal plates. All of his pieces have some element of carefully controlled tumult, something brewing beneath the surface. Often Locatelli breaks his tiles in a precise but organic way, creating fault lines that ripple through the entire piece and create movement and a sense of tension. In one such piece, the fingers of a sculpted hand can be seen gripping the side of the jagged crack, as though peeling it back for a better look at the real world. Other works are more subtle: An impression of a human figure, outlined by hairline fractures.

According to Cross Connect Mag, Locatelli explains: “My early works are sharp and are often torn apart by heads and figures that try and break the wall and is still the subject of the breakage that bewitches me.”

Locatelli’s recurring motifs of breakage and emergency are complemented by his sculptures of materials re-made, formed into eggs or other objects. What’s interesting about his choice of tiles is that they are found so often in people’s houses, especially in places of comfort and privacy; in other words, places that have intimate knowledge of our lives. Perhaps that’s why the pieces are so unsettling, as they blend the familiar with the surreal along with elements of a Poe-esque horror.

“I wonder what meanings and feelings these (once) familiar places arouse in those who lived there,” Locatelli says. “I see them as restless dreams, spaces in ruins inhabited by ghosts that still retain an embryonic life.”

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Matthias Schaller Photographs The Palettes Of Monet And Other Famous Artists

Monet

Monet

Van Gogh

Van Gogh

Renoir

Renoir

Munch

Munch

From the illuminated, impressionistic water lilies of Monet, to the bright and disjointed abstract forms of Kandinsky, to the thick earthy tones of Van Gogh’s landscapes, most of us can recognize an artist’s signature style at a glance. But photographer Matthias Schaller shows us a new side of these things we may not have seen, or even thought about before. Since 2007, Schaller has been compiling a fascinating historical archive of the palettes, the pigments, the chaos (or order), and the thought patterns of some of the world’s most famous creative brains.

He has photographed over 200 palettes from around 70 painters from the 19th and 20th centuries and is displaying a selection for us to enjoy. His exhibition called Das Meisterstück (The Masterpiece) is on display alongside the Venice Biennale. Having blown up several of his photographs to be around six feet tall, Schaller invites other art-loving fans to enter the creative space of the masters with him. We can marvel at the tools that they used in the same way we are impressed by the final product. These photographs of their palettes easily become the new masterpieces.

Schaller started his fascination with looking ‘behind the scenes’ of an artist’s practice and reputation when he visited Cy Twombly’s studio in Gaeta, Italy. Spotting the painter’s palette, and finding it just as absorbing as the paintings themselves, he started a mission to seek out others.

He discovered dusky hues on the palette of John Singer Sargent, the synthetic vibrancy on that of Vincent van Gogh, the mottled splotches left by Paul Gaugin, the dense color field accumulated by Pierre Bonnard, and the overlapping disorder of rich colors left by Frida Kahlo. (Source)

See if you can match up the right artist to the right style and habits. It’s an interesting art history lesson!

Via Hyper Allergic

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Christo And Jeanne-Claude’s Massive Fabric-Accented Landscapes

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Christo and Jeanne-Claude wrap and accent their environments with millions of square feet of rope shroud and fabric. Their wrapped and accented installations recontextualize the objects and their surrounding spaces, asking the viewer to consider both the presence and absence of the wrapped objects and the perception of new landscapes. At once conceptually simple and physically difficult to bring to complete fruition, the new environments are breathtaking in their starkness and beauty. Their installations often consume years of commitment and devotion. Wrapped Trees were the outcome of 32 years of effort.

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Duda Lanna

A native of Porto Alegre, Brazil, artist Duda Lanna creates colorful paintings and illustrations of often mind-bending detail. The artist claims inspirations both within the realm of visual arts and separate from them, including science fiction and psychedelic rock of the ’70s. These diverse inspirations definitely show in his many works in ink and acrylic. Their vibrant color palette and bold graphic patterns will take you on a trip, that is for sure. Folks, hold on to your eyeballs.

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Dan Bradica’s Lansdcapes Altered With Paper And Lights

Dan Bradica lives and works in Chicago. Using extremely basic materials (paper and fluorescent lights) he obscures, highlights, and examines the world around him. An image of stacked cardboard boxes in a field of barren trees becomes a metaphor for the consequences of deforestation. In other work pieces of bright paper take form of apparitions and playfully haunt the scene. These simple alterations reinvigorate the landscape and simultaneously comment on waste, excess, and consumption.

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