Get Social:

Kirsten Stingle’s Gleefully Macabre Miniature Sculptures Will Leave You Breathless

12367430334_8ae1973055_b

12367430204_3e4728969d_b

12366977605_13380ee0f5_b

12367142223_5fef35f29b_z

For her series of ceramic sculptures titled Shadow Circus, Kirsten Stingle draws upon her extensive training in the theater to create subtle narrative pieces. Incorporating found objects with her considerable technical ability, the artist summons dreamy stories through her command over gesture and shape; the blend of rusted objects and newly formed faces stands in for any physical movement normally employed to convey the passage of time.

Shadow Circus is evocative of miniature puppetry works like Alexander Calder’s legendary circus, where only the slightest details make the inanimate appear human. The narrative power of the circus lies of course in motion, which Calder once evoked with his pulleys and threads; Stingle impressively avoids the performative, and her painfully still works appear as if frozen, on the verge of animation.

In this way, each figure reveals itself like a funerary figure, meant to accompany not Cleopatra but the modern woman into her tomb, bringing with her objects useful in some imagined underworld: a machine-horse hybrid motorbike, a foreboding rowboat with wheels. The work’s religious iconography further realizes this thrust toward an otherworldly eternity; a Catholic-style papal mitre makes an appearance, surrounded by delicate symbols of the cross.

The artist also seems to pull from the work of women artists like Georgia O’Keeffe, combining fatalistic bleach white bone with the seductive prettiness of a pink rose, red lipstick, or a baby doll wearing pale bunny ears. Placed firmly within this feminine aesthetic, Shadow Circus is simultaneously blossoming and fertile and eerily disquieting; Stingle’s nuanced work appeals both to a fear of death and a hope for rebirth. Each piece, with its antique aesthetic and meticulously fashioned visage, is poignantly left eternally waiting for the movement and life that feels so inherent within her. (via Hi-Fructose)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Diane Meyer’s Hand Embroidered Photographs

Diane Meyer distorts sections of personal photos resulting in compositions that comment on memory. In her own words: “This series is based on photographs taken at various points in my life and arranged by location. Sections of the images have been obscured through a layer of embroidered pixels sewn directly into the photograph. The embroidery deteriorates sections of the original photograph forming a new pixelated  layer of the original scene. The project refers to the failures of photography in preserving experience and personal history as well as the means by which photographs become nostalgic objects that obscure objective understandings of the past.” (via)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Kwang-Ho Lee’s Ultra Vivid Paintings Of Prickly Cacti Are Far Out

leekwangho paintingkawng ho lee paintingkawng ho lee paintingkawng ho lee painting

Artist Kwang-Ho Lee paints cacti that are far out. His accurate renderings of the prickly plant become ultra real even alien in Lee’s environment. This has to do with the artist’s signature style which applies paint in an opaque manner to large canvases. This gives the work a heightened sense of color making them more shocking and cinematic. The colors are ultra vivid and become a heightened form of realism. When applied onto huge surfaces they jump off the canvases. The secondary pigments further highlight the type of cacti Lee favors which is hairy. Some even look similar to the Addams Family’s cousin it and little orphan Annie. Others take on phallic connotations and evoke slight dreadlock nuances.

Lee is part of a group of painters tagged as modern realists. Using an expert skill set they capture subject matter, then turn it into something else with pigment, scale and application. Other projects Lee has been involved include depicting a series of Asian family members on chairs. These resemble typical provincial settings around the dinner table waiting for the meal to end and mahjong to begin. In a more recent series the painter depicts winter forest landscapes. He separates these by depicting the areas in day and night which ultimately capture the frozen trees and nubby bushes entangled in a state of dormancy and hibernation. His marks and color propel them into another place and time one that’s just a little bit off from reality.  (via honestlywtf)

Currently Trending

Carlo Van De Roer

These images are so damn soothing. Carlo Van De Roer’s uncomplicated yet sophisticated compositions calm my soul, in a contemporary-non-smooth-jazz Múm kinda way.

Currently Trending

Gross Yet Beautiful Artworks Made Of Mould And Bacteria

magical-contamination-by-antoine-bridier-nahmias-designboom-01g1magical-contamination-by-antoine-bridier-nahmias-designboom-03g4

Yes, you read that right; the artist Antoine Bridier-Nahmias paints with mould, marrying art and science in an unexpectedly delightful way. His strange media include various sets of bacteria and fungi, ranging in color, texture, and density, and a petri dish serves as his canvas. Once a piece is grown to his aesthetic satisfaction, the artist photographs it from above, capturing the nuances of the material in stunning resolution.

Bridier-Nahmias’s images, perhaps revolting if seen inside your fridge, are visually enthralling when viewed in the sterile confines of the dish. Like strange and serendipitous science experiments, the moldy surfaces create ordered geometric patterns found time and again in nature; unlike paint, the bacteria reproduces itself in accordance with complex biological laws, forming perfect circles and straight lines that emanate from their centers.

A gorgeous visual balance is achieved through the artist’s careful and deliberate use of color and form; within the gestalt of the dish, puffy clouds of mould, large as sand dollars, are balanced out perceptually with bright reds; seemingly disparate species of bacteria work together to create a harmonious work.

In these pieces, the chaos of life and bacterial growth exists in continual tension with the neatly ordered aesthetic of the work, inviting views to examine moldy patterns not with disgust but with transfixed delight. When given free reign to multiply within the petri dish, these species create astoundingly formal compositions, flawless patterns that no master artist has come even close to replicating. Take a look. (via Design Boom and It’s Nice That)

Currently Trending

Shoplifter’s Imaginary Entourage Sculptures

Icelandic artist Hrafnhildur Arnardottir (also known as Shoplifter) created a playful inanimate entourage.  Her series Imaginary Friends is composed of a number of various sculptures which seem to each vaguely resemble a person.  The Friends appear to be sparsely constructed and made of familiar materials.  It is intriguing for how well they imply human figures considering the little they use.  Imagining a unique personality for each piece isn’t difficult.  Arnardottir also seems to touching on the way identity is expressed in personal adornment and dress.

Really, much of Arnardottir’s work tip-toes between fashion and art.  In fact, her familiarity with style and design has garnered her collaborations with several magazines.  Arnardottir’s art, however, has teamed her up with some especially high-profile creatives such as legendary musician Bjork and super-artists Assum Vivid Astro Focus.

Currently Trending

Xavier Chassaing


SCINTILLATION from Xavier Chassaing on Vimeo.

Currently Trending

Andres Serrano’s Powerful Images Of Death

 photography14

The Morgue (Infectious Pneumonia)

Andres Serrano photography11

The Morgue (Pneumonia drowning)

The Morgue (Death Unknown)

The Morgue (Death Unknown)

Artist Andres Serrano‘s series of photographs The Morgue investigates ideas of death and our relationship with it.  Working with a forensic pathologist Serrano photographed the bodies with a near classical beauty rarely associated with the morgue.  Serrano ensured the anonymity of each person through tight cropping or veiling the face.  The way in which the light interacts with the bodies and their veils is reminiscent of Italian baroque painting.  The chiaroscuro of each photograph seems to underscore some mystery behind death balancing the morgue’s comparatively cold analytic approach.  Further, the careful attention to detail and composition dignifies each person.  Each subject, some actually unknown persons, are considered individually as initial shock gives way to contemplation and reflection.  However, these are not sentimental images.  There still remains a certain emotional detachment, a terrible loneliness in death, and Serrano’s intention is ambiguous.  Each photograph’s title is each subject’s respective cause of death, and have been inserted in each photographs’ caption.  Also, please note: Some may consider these photographs to be graphic and/or disturbing.  (via boum!bang!)

Currently Trending