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Interview: Bryan Dalton





Bryan Dalton is a multi-faceted artist creating a broad range of projects, from a website entitled “Sweet Gifs” devoted entirely to the increasingly popular early 90’s proto-web-wizardry of, you guessed it, sweet gifs, to a bi-annual independently published “pyschedelic field trip” ‘zine. On top of this all, he runs a freelance photo-illustration, design and animation firm in Portland Oregon. The unifying aesthetic that unites all his divergent practices is a playful irony and with a touch of kitsch-magic.

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Sven Sachsalber Literally Looks For A Needle In A Haystack As Part Of 24 Hour Performance

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While, to most, the phrase “looking for a needle in a haystack” is merely a humdrum idiom, to performance artist Sven Sachsalber, it’s a challenge. That is why Sachsalber opted to devote 24 hours to handpicking his way through a pile of hay set in the Palais de Tokyo. The entire performance was documented as a video on a live feed, and–spoiler alert!–18 hours passed before the artist finally found the elusive bodkin.

While, as in the case of Looking for a Needle in the Haystack, Sachsalber tends to gravitate toward performance art, he also shows an inclination toward sculpture, film, and photography–a fact that is worth noting when considering this recent project.  By placing an enormous haystack within the context of an art museum and filming himself interacting with it, the artist inadvertently transforms the mound into a piece that transcends traditional artistic description.

Galerie Rianne Groen describes his ourvre as “often funny, often serious and sometimes both,” and emphasizes that “his works have a universal poetic element that does not need much explanation.” And, with this literal, almost tongue-in-cheek interpretation of such a tried and true figure of speech, this statement undoubtedly holds true. (Via Hypebeast)

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Vincent Skoglund’s Light

The lighting in Vincent Skoglund’s Lightyears series is absolutely astonishing. Also make sure to check out his adidas adicolor series specially made for you sneaker heads.

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Illustrator Spotlight – Flavio Melchiorre

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Flavio Melchiorre is an Italian illustrator and designer.  After 10 years of designing for fashion and advertising, Flavio has developed his own personal style.  Some of his works are packed with color and lean towards the psychedelic side of life.  Crazy patterns grace the backgrounds of Flavio’s world.  His colors are rich, but some of my favorite pieces of his are the black and white works.  Take a look at the basket of fun waiting for you after the jump.

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Kent Rogowski

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Kent Rogowski has been hard at work on several different projects that flash a delicate sense of humor on the big question of identity. He is also the founder of Scaffold, a non-profit organization that gives fellowships to emerging and mid-career artists.

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Aaron S. Moran’s Reclaimed Wood Sculptures

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Location is important to Canadian artist  Aaron S. Moran. The wood sculptures he creates are both inspired by, and dependent on pieces of wood that he finds in a particular area. From them, he assembles the discarded material into works of art. Using a variety of colors, textures, and patterns, he creates pieces that create a dialogue between place, media, and the viewer.

At times, his sculptures feel like they are going to combust. In his series If You Resist This! and Wash Up (Boundary Bay), wood is unevenly matched in color and size. Pieces are wedged, layered, and placed where they will fit. The non-matching feels almost haphazard, like the piece’s shelf life wasn’t supposed to be very long. This visual tension feels volatile, as if there is something is ticking inside them and about to burst.

At other times, Moran’s sculptures are more docile. They hold an entirely different air and attitude. Here, he uses wood that’s been painted colors of a pretty sunset. Moran has considered placement of colors and arranged the wood in patterns. He titled the series Kite Contest/1991, conjuring up the feelings you’d get from a warm, pleasant day. He writes this about the series, poetically stating, “Sun filtered nostalgia, memories of vibrant kites flying high in the sky along the shore of a beach. Lively patterns from days gone by, blurred by time. Sun bleached photographs of smiling faces. Picnic blankets and pinwheels moving in the warm breeze.”

Moran is currently pursuing his MFA with the University of Windsor in Windsor, Ontario, Canada. He lives along the Detroit River on the border of Canada and the United States. You can follow his works in progress and inspiration on his Tumblr, Year On A River.

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Akane Moriyama’s Beautifully Chromatic ‘Cubic Prism’

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By all accounts, particularly documentation photos, Akane Moriyama’s newest installation appears to be nothing more than floating colors. The piece, titled Cubic Prism, is actually large skeins of prismatic and semi-transparent polyester fabric, ethereally suspended between two buildings in the courtyard of Goldsmith Hall at the University of Texas, Austin. Cubic Prism shows both rigid characteristics (the ‘skeleton’ of the piece holds it’s cubed shape) as well as the looseness of flowing fabrics.

Akane Moriyama, a designer who was born in Japan and is currently based in Stockholm, Sweden, uses her background in textile design to create such works. By hanging more than 150 large pieces of sewn fabric, the cubed form resembles a canopy (or hammock) shape. Natural elements such as wind obviously effect the installation, though perhaps the most interesting reaction is the natural color play of light and sun when seen between the almost translucent fabric layers. This colorplay activates the entire courtyard, buildings and natural environment for viewers, giving off gorgeous multi-colored glows. (via from89 and designboom)

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Early Record Covers By The Prince Of Pop Art, Andy Warhol

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Before he was the Prince of Pop Art and arguably the biggest art star on the planet, Andy Warhol was one of the most sought-after graphic illustrators in Manhattan. Years before he designed two of Rock and Roll’s most iconic album covers, Warhol was responsible for a series of recently recovered Jazz record covers for Count Bassie, Thelonious Monk and Moondog.

Rendered in his then-trademark ‘blotted line’ style (a technique Warhol mastered before screenprinting, where a single line of heavy, beaded ink was drawn on one sheet of paper, and then pressed against another which created a blotted monoprint), these whimsical and funky covers graced some of the best jazz albums of the 1950’s.  The quality of Warhol’s highly trained freehand drawings separated him from other commercial illustrators of the day, but one of his many secret weapons was his mother’s gorgeous script writing, seen heavily in the looping, colorful script featured on The Story of Moon Dog (above). Warhol employed his mother’s lovely writing to essentially double his work-load, a precursor to his loose-authorship creative policy that would become commonplace later in his Factory days. (via dangerous minds)

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