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Caroline Morin’s Dreamy Girls

Caroline Morin’s exquisite drawings of girls floating through space.

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Sean Fader

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Sean Fader’s background in performance had a heavy hand on the focus of his photography. His consistently conceptually strong pieces of work usually deal with the identity of his self, and the self perceived by those around him. What originally drew me into his work was his series, I Want To Put You On, where he explores the idea of becoming the people he personally admires.

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Nate Page

Nate Page

I’m loving these carved magazines by artist Nate Page . Page uses methods of drawing and assemblage to create these paper landscapes. It’s such a simple and powerful idea! I’m a big fan of this series, but some here at Beautiful/Decay think it looks like “bad sand art…” but I’d have to disagree, at the very least it’s ‘cool’ sand art.

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Prune Nourry’s ‘Terracotta Daughters’ Reflect Gender Preference In China

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Modeled after the iconic Terracotta Warriors, artist Prune Nourry’s series Terracotta Daughters is an installation featuring eight life-size sculptures modeled after eight Chinese orphan girls. It’s meant to reflect upon gender preference in China through the familiar symbolism of the soldiers, and Nourry created an army of 116 figures using the same clay that was dug up over 2,000 years ago for the original warriors. In this project, the artist also learned the local copyists’ technique based off the ancient practice.

Together, India and China represent ⅓ of the world population and both have a similar gender imbalance. This is because of the preference that parents give to having a son; the number of single men has been increasing since the 1980’s as well as the misuse of ultrasounds to choose the sex of the child. This has detrimental consequences for the women in Asia including kidnappings of children and women, forced marriages, prostitution, and more.

Nourry met the 8 orphan Chinese girls that inspired the artworks through the non-profit organization The Children of Madaifu. She photographed the girls during her visit to their villages in August 2012 and used the portraits as models for the sculptures. Nourry series that go beyond the sculptures and does good, too:

With the idea of continuity in mind, Prune works hand-in-hand with The Children of Madaifu to support the education of the 8 little girls for a minimum of 3 years thanks to the sale of the 8 original sculptures. In addition, each one of the little girls will be invited to the exhibition in Beijing in order to meet their terracotta double. The girls will also receive a 30 cm artist proof of Prune’s Mini Terracotta Daughter.
Thus, each collector who acquires one of the 8 unique original terracotta sculptures supports the project, as well as 3 years of the education of the little girl depicted in the Artwork.

Terracotta Daughters has travelled the world, and now they are in New York City. From September 11 to October 4, you can find them at China Institute.

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Mister Fungo’s Psychedelic Gifs

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Tumblr sensation Mister Fungo creates funky, mind-bending gifs that vacillate between psychedelic and zombie inspired imagery. The bright colors, together with their mesmerizing movements, create a lively yet freaky vibe.

You can find more of his works on his website.

( via Supersonic Electric)

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Mapping The Void

Artist and clothing designer Jerry Gretzinger reveals the process and philosophy behind his decades-long mapping project. Watch the full video after the jump.

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Roger Minick’s “Sightseers” Photos From The 1970s Take You Back In Time

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Roger Minick

 

While teaching at the Ansel Adams Workshops in Yosemite National Park in the 1970s Roger Minick began photographing sightseers.  Interested in this American activity Minick wanted to capture the “cacophony of clicking shutters” and waves of tourists seeking photographic proof that they had made it to a famous vista.

Minick’s photographs portray unique narratives of what is mainly America’s middle-class.  Poignant and humorous all at once, the images show varied individuals with intriguing and sometimes seemingly strange stories.  What is interesting is that, so far as a viewer can tell, all the subjects have only one thing in common: their desire to be in famous places in nature.  Sometimes stereotyped Minick’s images successfully portray the American tourist as being wholly distinct.

Moreover, set against iconic backdrops the images become more than just portraits.  They demonstrate a juxtaposition of nature and culture.  As David Pagel wrote in the LA Times in 1997, “these supple works use the discomfort most people feel when confronted by nature’s inhuman scale as a metaphor for the precariousness of culture in a democratic society. Awkward and uncertain, sometimes fun and at other times frightening, this quiet anxiety is a big part of these pictures’ power.”

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Vegan Taxidermist’s Beautiful Creations Pose Ethical Questions

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As a child, the vegan taxidermist Nicola Jayne Hebson wandered the Blackburn, England countryside, the sight of dead animals haunting her memory long after she returned home. The indignity of remains left to rot struck a chord in her, and she finally took a pair of mating, deceased frogs home, gently placing them in a frame, forever bound mid-coitus.

The artist, now 23, taught herself taxidermy, using only roadkill and deceased pets. The decision to use any living or once-living creature for the sake of art raises ethical questions, but Hebson hopes that debate over her work will inspire viewers to consider the ethics of the meat industry.

Ultimately, Hebson’s work reads as an emphatic attempt to reanimate a being that no longer exists, and it that sense it does—perhaps unfairly— claim nonhuman remains as an expression of the inherently human will to be remembered after death. But in this case, the work itself is so painstakingly delicate that it feels surprisingly generous; her careful craft isn’t a boastful display of her own ability; instead, it recalls ancient mummifications or ritualistic burial practices.

Her creations exude a life-like pathos uncommon in taxidermy in part because of her paradoxical choice to rely upon fantasy over strict realism, appealing to a more emotionally heightened realm of poetry and make-believe. One rat appears to lay a loved one to rest, and the viewer is seduced into mournfulness, forgetting for a brief moment that both rats are in fact dead. Other, more surreal creatures exist within what we might imagine to be a sort of afterlife; her seven-headed rat quietly recalls the biblical Book of Revelations.

Hebson’s creations are dizzyingly anachronistic, seeming to draw inspiration from anywhere between the Medieval Gothic period to the Victorian age. Unified only in their deaths, her works speak across generations and inspire us to mourn for those we so often forget. (via BUST and VICE)

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