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Mark Titchner

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Mark Titchner’s esoteric aura portraits, heavy tubular bells and subliminal messages. Magical works that subversively explore belief systems the imagery that surrounds them and the other side.

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Bob Staake’s Twisted Little Remixes of Classic Kid Tales

Bob Staake, the author and illustrator of more than 50 children’s books, has reimagined the covers of kid-friendly classics from the 1940s, 50s, and 60s, giving each one a twist that is often more PG-13 than G and always darkly comical. With a simple off-beat quip and a slightly adjusted illustration, those once comforting, sweet tales of little trains that could and hungry little catepillars morph into something a little more sinister and a bit disconcerting. You know what? You can take a look at more of Staake’s “Bad Little Children’s Books” after the jump, while I go find a stuffed animal to hug.

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T/\KEC/\RE


Fresh design work by T/\KEC/\RE found on our very own B/D creative flickr pool! Simple clean graphics with a clear message – always a winning formula – all you young graphic designers out there take note.

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Ben Pobjoy’s Cosplay Convention


Ben Pobjoy’s Conventional Kids series  is a collection of photographs that were taken of young cosplayers in 2011 at Montreal’s Otakuthon anime convention. The photos document cosplayers, their elaborate costumes, their social interactions and, above all else, their use of constructed identity to facilitate the self-exploration that is necessary to forge one’s own personal identity during adolescence.

While the birth of Japanese animation dates back to the beginning of the 20th century, the characteristic anime style that has since become ubiquitous was first developed by Osamu Tezuka in the 1960s. Now considered the ‘Godfather of Anime’, Tezuka’s early works gained increasing popularity in 1970s Japan and inspired three Meiji University students to organize Comiket in 1975; Tokyo’s first anime convention. Thanks to adaptations of both anime films and television series for overseas markets in the 1980s, the popularity of both anime and its fan-driven conventions soon spread internationally.

 

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Mark Licari

Mark Licari
Betlejuice must be hiding inside LA based artist Mark Licari, becuase his work is creepy-cool with lots of charisma. I’m seriously digging his sculptural pieces, especially the medicine cabinet. Go see his show up through February 14th at the Montery Museum of Art, or check him out at Honor Fraser Gallery.

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Abraham McNally

 

 

Abraham McNally merges things. Things like powerlines and houses, industry and nature, drawings and photographs. The result is an exploration of what’s organic — organic in the sense of what’s natural and organic in the sense of what’s essential. McNally’s additional sculptural and site-specific work rounds an examination of the schism between “a romantic return to the rural” and “a return to the comforts and realities of American society.”

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Jens Ullrich’s

Jen Ulrch’s large scale collage series the “pilots” are collages of sports photographs found in today’s newspapers and pictures of sculptures from the period of National Socialism (1933 – 1945). The athletes are shown in the spectacular positions midair with their bodies stretched and bent in striking movements.  Juxtaposed together these images are at once weighed down by stone and metal sculptures and feather light, flying through the sky in a constant flux of motion.

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Andy Piedilato’s Visceral Paintings Of Shipwrecks Teeter On The Edge Of Abstraction

Andy Piedilato Painting Andy Piedilato PaintingAndy Piedilato PaintingAndy Piedilato Painting

Using abstract expressionism as muse, Brooklyn painter Andy Piedilato plays off visceral emotion. With unyielding imagination, he reaches a place between here and another, a type of painter’s purgatory, where ship wrecks float in brick shaped waves on huge panoramic canvases. Intertwined with vast metaphors, the ship motif was first inspired when a friend built his own boat. The idea stayed with Piedilato and he started thinking about how a handmade vessel would fare at sea. Soon he was painting parts of boats with a technique he had already acquired using bricks. This completely changed his purely abstract canvases.  Paintings that were once finished in a day were now taking a month to complete. Before, the focus was not so much on a thing but a moment. This produced dozens of messy works which concentrated on sole mark making.

Today, his painstakingly tedious process uses a technique which paints around hand taped sections of canvas, allowing the tiny brick shapes to form into pictures. The results are flatter and less heavily impastoed. There’s a translucency present, especially in two recent works called “Red Sail” and “Sea Snail.” Both over 10′ wide, they exude a Japanese scroll effect making them slightly more watercolorish. This might account for the large amount of white in the background, thus opening up a new path for Piedilato. His present state of mind, is that of an artist who’s been asked to paint ‘smaller’ by potential dealers to encourage more salability. His refusal has allowed the paintings to get bigger and weirder, adding more aura to his increasing cult hero status.

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