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Merijn Hos aka Bfree


 

Personally, if I had a name that sounded as much like a wizards as Merijn Hos, (here I am thinking of the grand Myrrdin Wyltt) I would never foresake it for an alias! Though, Bfree is also a righteous sentiment. Merijn can do no wrong! I love these playful, long-legged freckled characters that reminds me of 70’s scractch ‘n’ snuff stickers and Mr. Men. Straight from Utrecht, yo!

 

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Goodbye Puppy Lover, Kate!

Kate

Not only has Kate bequeathed copious amounts of love and affection on Mr. Zigglez, our lil hard-workin’ B/D office mascot (which makes her good in my books) she has won all of our respect here at B/D for her amazing bit-mapped B/D graphics, lovely blog posts, and sharp as nails design sensibility! We will miss you terribly Kate. We were not so sure, seeing as your boyfriend Matt interned here first and is a very hard act to follow. Just kidding! We were sure you would totally be better than him. Just kidding! We love you both equally. Thanks again! Check out Kate’s amazing design portfolio here and view some of her works after the jump!

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Amy Elkins’ Thought-Provoking Project Born From Correspondence With Death Row Inmates

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Los Angeles based photographer Amy Elkins recently won the 2014 Aperture Prize for her project Black Is The Day, Black Is The Night, which explores identity, time, and masculinity through correspondence, memorabilia, and composite landscapes, involving death row inmates. Elkins based this project on a number of long-term friendships she developed with men either serving lifetime sentences or on death row. As a pen pal to these inmates, Elkins explores an alternate sense of reality, reaching toward that of the 1,500 people currently on death row in the United States.

Drawing from these conversations and histories, she formulated composite photographs representative of what she learned of these men, and then created a method of aging and manipulating the photographs based on how much time had passed since they were first incarcerated. What comes from that are these gauzy, dreamy photographs that are clotted with layers but still delicate and vague, nearly transparent. The loose metaphor of memory, clarity, and vision are entangled in this series, heightened by photographs of the actual correspondence, memorabilia, and quotes from various letters.

The title of the project comes from a poem Elkins received from an inmate, “It spoke about that environment so well. The idea of being pulled away from anything. Experiencing no variance. Everything is the same; everything is dark. The poem is mind-blowing. Better for him to describe the situation than me.” (Excerpt from Source)

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Six Artists Transform Sugar Into Art

Aude Moreau sugar

Aude Moreau

Aude Moreau sugar

Aude Moreau

At Beautiful Decay we are beginning to bring our readers weekend coverage, where we’ll be sharing micro art trends of the unusual and unexpected every weekend.  And we figured what better way to start than with dessert?

The work featured here of artists Peter Bugg, Rebecca Holland, William Lamson, Aude Moreau, Navid Nuur and Kara Tanaka demonstrates that diverse ways confection can become conceptual.  From the painstaking process of Moreau’s Sugar Carpet (which uses 4,500 pounds of loose Domino sugar) to the haunting ephemerality of Tanaka’s Social Leveler (When Immortality Became Uncouth)the use of sugar as a medium, sometimes in combination with other materials, becomes an expansive tactile vehicle.

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Homeless in Orlando by James Florio

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Photographer James Florio created the series Homeless in Orlando.  Alternating between slides of text and black and white photographs.  The series captures the home and life of a homeless couple, Robert and Heather.  Robert and Heather live in the woods of Orlando, Florida.  The words and images describe the events that led to their home among the urban forests of the über-developed tourist hub.

The series feels much more like a film with its strong and touching narrative.  Using a minimal amount of words and elegant photographs, Florio presents Robert and Heather in a way that is surprisingly emotionally engaging.  He shows how typically simple tasks such as taking a shower, can become absurdly challenging.  Homeless in Orlando provides a rare insight and is especially affecting.  The rest of the Robert and Heather’s story unfolds after the jump.  You’ll want to see it through to the last image.

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Amanda Burnham’s Fractured Installations Of An American City

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When artist Amanda Burnham first moved to Baltimore, Maryland, she didn’t know anyone. So, she spent a lot of time in her 7th floor apartment that had interesting views of the city. The time spent observing and recording her surroundings later informed her temporary, site-specific installations that are a patchwork representation of Baltimore. Burnham draws and paints street signs, fire hydrants, architecture, and store fronts, piecing them together in a manner that’s fractured yet cohesive. Taking elements of a neighborhood (or neighborhoods), she fashions her own view of the city, creating work large enough for a viewer to walk around and between. In an interview with Dwanye Butcher of Visual Baltimore, Burnham explains why she chooses to work this way (and why she reuses paper and boxes):

The idea of things being layered and pieced together is important to me. I see this city, and really all cities, as these giant ad-hoc organisms – collectively authored, chop-a-bloc, joints exposed – an ongoing melange of edits, adjustments, negotiations. I hope to suggest that with the deliberately collage-y, visually dense, maximalist aesthetic of my drawings.  I also love paper and what it does when treated as an object – the shadows it casts, the way tears and cuts are line. Most of the paper I use is really cheap stuff – low grade drawing paper that comes in rolls, kraft paper, packing materials. Boxes. That’s important because I’m not rich, but also because I see it as conceptually significant – resourcefulness is an ethic I sometimes see evidenced in the forms of the city, and it’s one I really respond to.

Burnham not only takes the outdoors indoors, but creates a whole new environment in a matter of a few days to a week. Lighting, astro turf, and electrical tape craft an ambience that’s unique to the city.

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Slinkachu’s Tiny Installation Work In The Street

 

Slinkachu has continued to carry out his poetic, mini street installations since we last checked in with him. The British artist continues to up the ante with each new, ephemeral piece. Employing miniature figurines and various objects, the artist stages tiny dramas (often humorous, and socially aware) in site-specific public locations. Click through to see some newer images of his “Little People Project” (previously) and some selections from the slightly older  “Inner City Snail” series.  

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Olek Covers The World… In Crochet

You wouldn’t think that crocheting could be made exciting but Olek has managed to push it to the extreme, crocheting anything that comes in her path.

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