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Michelle Hamer Hand-Stitches Pixelated Versions Of Textual Urban Landscapes

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Michelle Hamer hand-stitches pixelated versions of photographs she’s taken of urban spaces, mainly those occupied by text found in advertising, signage, or graffiti. She stitches her images into perforated plastic, transforming flat, static images of everyday public urban life into tactile needlepoints that recall private and domestic spaces.

Hamer explains,

“I see my work as a type of socio-historic documentation. The images depicted are in between moments that we often take for granted. The obviously slow process allows viewers to become more conscious of these moments which are captured within an instant and consider the difference between the manual and the digital. The in-between spaces (on/off ramps of freeways etc.) where signage can often be found is both necessary for our infrastructure, but also generally not noticed. Similarly, much of the text, advertising signage, streetscapes are so familiar we can fail to focus/really see it, but it’s often reflective of our broader social ambitions, aspirations and edicts.”

(via this isn’t happiness)

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Matt Espantman

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Matt Espantman creates some fun brightly colored works and some silly videos. I like the faceless astronaut, above.

 

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Jim Gaylord opens tonight @ Gregory Lind

Jim Gaylord will be exhibiting new work at Gregory Lind gallery, opening Sat. Feb 5th and running til March 14th. Building on his past work as a filmmaker, Gaylord’s work cultivates and abstracts imagery from special effects and action sequences in the movies. With titles like “Study (Braveheart + Jackass: the Movie + Cloverfield + Last of the Mohicans + Home Alone 2), 2009,” Gaylord reveals the humor behind popular culture through the lens of movies.

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The Morbidly Peculiar Animal Skeletons Of Caitlin T. McCormack Are Crocheted Out Of String

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The morbid sculptures of Caitlin T. McCormack would fit right in at your next Halloween party. She creates beautifully intricate skeletons of fictional creatures – rodents, seahorses, insects and animals. Not only do they look fragile, macabre, antique, precious and ghoulish, but you would probably be surprised to learn what they are made from. The artist actually discovered that covering crocheted cotton string in PVA glue stiffens the material, producing a bone-like effect.

Her dark, heavenly creatures are usually displayed, sprawled out and pinned to a dark board of some sort. They look as if their skin and meat has been carefully dissected and discarded, leaving their skeletal remains to be gracefully displayed for all to delight in their discovery. Not only does McCormack craft these intricate alien-bone-forms, but also delicate lace work, dramatic dresses that look like they were worn to a ghost’s wedding, and charming little illustrations and plasticine characters that usually reference a well known horror story.

The busy artist doesn’t stop there – her work will be also feature as a part of the group show Opus Hypnagogia: Sacred Spaces of the Visionary and Vernacular at The Morbid Anatomy Museum in Brooklyn, New York. Exploring states we experience between waking and sleeping, the show is a journey into altered perspectives, dark thoughts and unknown visions. A combination of historical, ‘Outsider’ and Visionary art, the show promises to be enlightening and entertaining. Running from July 18th – October 15th, be sure to explore the show and bring out your own black magic.

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Oleg Dou’s Children’s Death Portraits

Oleg Dou takes inspiration from 20th century portraits of dead children and creates an arresting series of ghostly images that are at once innocent and frightening.

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Beautiful/Decay Presents…5 Reasons to Subscribe

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“Why should I subscribe to Beautiful/Decay,” one may find themselves wondering, “when I can pay over 33% more to purchase it on newsstands? And besides, running the risk of Beautiful/Decay selling out before I get a hold of my hand-numbered, limited edition copy is so exhilarating, it’s practically legalized gambling!”

In addition to the popularly publicized reasons of saving money and never missing a copy, Beautiful/Decay has actually closely guarded, for centuries now, a highly secret set of reasons to subscribe. Until today, that is. In collaboration with artist  C.W. Moss, Beautiful/Decay is proud to present a hand-painted watercolor series, illustrating 5 new reasons to subscribe.  Stay tuned every this week for 4 more great reasons to subscribe!

Subscribe today!

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Aldis Ozolins

 

Aldis Ozolins is a maker of zines, posters, and experimental illustrations that represent memories from the place he was born: Riga, Latvia. While Aldis’ current professional direction and focus is on graphic design and interactive experiences (both of which he is damn good at), we chose to feature his illustrative work and side-projects due to the strong emotional qualities embedded so clearly within each of the pieces. It’s easy to get lost in the figures and environments his images bring to life… enjoy a selection after the jump.

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Tom Eckert’s Visually Deceptive Wooden Sculptures

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These amazing sculptures are unbelievably crafted entirely out of wood, then painted. Tom Eckert uses traditional processes to create these works, mostly out of basswood, linden, and limewood, then applies waterborne lacquer using paint brushes and spray guns. Concealment and mystery form a large part of his work, indicated by his portrayal of shrouded items. Eckert: “Since childhood, I have been curious about and amused by mistaken impressions of reality presented as part of my visual experiences.  One of my earliest recollections, on a car trip, was my perception of the wet, slick highway ahead that turned out to be an illusion, a mirage.  The revelation that I was fooled, visually and intellectually tricked, stuck with me.  This visual deception is now the basis for my creative direction.”

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