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The Food Chain Project Wants To End Hunger By Selling Art

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Israeli-Dutch artist Itamar Gilboa has taken every morsel of food he consumed over a one year period and made an art piece out of it. Tagged “The Food Chain Project” Gilboa documented his intake over 365 days. Most of what he consumed consisted of normal diet items such as apples, burgers, cheese, coffee and soda. In the end he consumed 8,000 products.
After three years, he turned the lengthy documentation into an art piece. Each food item was replicated in white plaster. These became inventory in Gilboa’s traveling supermarket and eventually materialized into exhibits and commentary about hunger around the world. The objects look generic and could stand for any product which could end hunger for one person for a day in a starving country. Using white gives the items an anonymous nature but also prompts you to think about who can be the next to help by buying and filling in the blank so to speak.
Gilboa’s impetus for the project was to bring awareness to hunger and show the amount of food westerners consume and waste. He called it the food chain because of the cycle which occurred by his consumption, art making, selling then donating the money to charity.

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Angelo Musco’s Vortex of Human Bodies

From a distance the extremely dense photographs of Angelo Musco can be deceiving. From afar they look like organic abstractions but as you get closer you realize that the image is composed of thousands if not millions of tiny images of humans swirling into a never ending vortex. See detail shots of these dark and mysterious images after the jump.

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Interview: Mitch Beige Brown

Based out of Sydney Australia, Mitch Beige Brown is a young designer with a stunning portfolio of unusual and playful works under his belt. Ranging from ironic/iconic art direction and collaborations for record sleeves, Mitch’s perspective is a breath of fresh air. 

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More Press for B/D’s Spring 2010!

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Woohoo! The press keeps rolling in for our Spring 2010 line! This week has seen a number of other excellent reviews, including a mention by TWBE that Ben Tegel’s t-shirt, “Greetings from LA” above, looked as “if Paris Hilton turned into Heidi Montag.” I’d say that’s pretty accurate. Other great reviews from Spanky StokesAddicteed. Thanks guys, for the blog love!

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Hugh Kretschmer’s Surreal and humorous ad campaigns

Native Los Angeleno Hugh Kretschmer is one of those rare photographers who has the ability to completely transform a commercial ad campaign or editorial piece into a magical story that will move you. Using metaphor and hand crafted trick-the-eye elements he transports us to surreal narratives full of humor and intriguing mystery where anything can happen.

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Vintage L.L. Bean Catalog Covers Recreated As Photograph


Ever since I was a little kid I remember flipping through the L.L. Bean catalog. I never really bought anything from them but I always thought of them as a heritage brand and a classic symbol for Americana. To celebrate their 100th anniversary L.L. Bean tapped famed photographer Randal Ford to recreate their popular  Spring 1933 catalog cover using local residents from Maine’s Acadia National Park. L.L. Bean documented the entire photo shoot in all its outdoorsy glory with a short behind the scenes documentary. Witness how a vintage painting gets transformed into a modern photograph after the jump!

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Robin Rhodes Brings 2D Drawings To Life With Street Smarts

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South African born Robin Rhodes has a very special talent of bringing 2-dimensional street art drawings to life. Not only does he animate materials like chalk, charcoal and soap, but he inserts a very strong political and economic agenda into his work. He chooses to show his “performative drawings” in rapidly changing environments (Berlin and Johannesburg), commenting on luxury, privilege and gentrification. These two cities in particular are central to these ideas, and he feeds off the energy and grittiness of both places.

His work features imagery of everyday and consumer objects, such as paper clips, light bulbs, and champagne flutes, found in desolate urban settings as a reference to his upbringing, but also to broader universal ideas including desire, luxury, and the influx of consumerism into South African society. (Source)

In his latest show “having been there” (on now at Lehmann Maupin Gallery in Hong Kong), he exhibits photographic documentation of his unique street drawings. Rhodes not only brings to life simple linear sketches, but also includes himself in the process, adding to the whole dreamy feel of the scenarios he animates. His marks and gestures transform into quick, simple ideas surrounding his topics of focus: he pours champagne over a pyramid of glasses, he goes fishing on a blue wall, mounts and attempts to ride a bicycle – all acts linked into ideas of exuberance he could not afford as a child.

Rhode has also created a new animation that examines aspects of established Chinese myths, weaving a tale of struggle, of growth, and ultimately of evolution… highlighting themes frequently referenced in the artists’ work such as reinvention and transformation. (Source)

Rhodes is a quietly out-spoken street artist who stands out from your standard political activists. See more of his effective visual protests here and here.

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Claudio De Luca’s Sculptures Of Heads Merge The Physical And The Digital

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Recent university graduate Claudio De Luca has been experimenting with merging traditional sculptural methods with new technologies and coming up with some exciting results. He works with ceramics, bronze casting, wax and wood for the base of her artworks, and builds on them using modern, digital-based techniques. His final year’s work at the Cardiff School of Art and Design featured a series of ceramic skulls and heads that were filled with different material, and had cubic shapes bursting out from their fronts.

De Luca has been trying his hand at laser cutting, 3D printing, 3D scanning, 3D modelling, and CNC machining. The combination of these different methods are a nice metaphor for the subject of De Luca’s work. He explores the ideas of identity and representation in a modern world, and especially how we present ourselves in the digital world. He says:

Ones portrayal of themselves in an online ecosystem is largely skewed, this is a feature of who they should be, never are the insecurities shown or the flaws revealed. Vulnerabilities such as these are how we define our best attributes and ultimately forge long lasting relationships.

I look at how the facets of ones self are greatly lessened when choosing what information to construct in the digital space, through 3D scanning a person, I digitally ‘decimate’ the facets their faces are made of thus abstracting there true self. This I feel is what would best visually represent ones online identity in a digital setting. The less facets to be seen, the less a person is truly showing of themselves.

He uses the shapes in her work as a metaphor for the two realities merging – the physical and the digital. The effect of these ‘hollow faces’ are a scary reflection of what type of people we are becoming in this digital age. It makes you want to check your own reflection in the mirror, doesn’t it?

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