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Made With Color Presents: Rachel Meuler’s Hybrid Beasts

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Made With Color, a website builder for artists and creatives, and Beautiful/Decay team up each week to bring you some of the best contemporary artists and designers from around the world. Website builder Made With Color helps artists easily create well-designed mobile/tablet responsive websites in a few minutes without having to touch a line of code.This week we are pleased to present the work of Made With Color user Rachel Meuler.

New York City based artist Rachel Meuler is a collagist of sorts. However instead of cutting up magazines and books to create her imagery, Meuler cleverly combines a mix of animal and human figures to create a new species of hybrid beings.These half man half beast figures are in a constant state of motion and transformation. The combination of human and animal imagery reinforces the similarities between all living things, while referencing characters from ancient mythologies, folklore and fairy tales, Jungian archetypes, evolutionary anomalies, and the mutant results of genetic engineering – beings originating from and entrenched in cultural fears and fantasies.  These subjects are shown exchanging information through a language of posturing, mirroring, projecting, and cannibalizing traits from each other and their surroundings, within compositional structures that imply hierarchy and narrative, but remain inconclusive.

 

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Edible Art Supplies: Design Firm Nendo Creates Chocolate Paint Tubes and Pencils

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If you have a huge sweet tooth like I do, then the chocolate art supplies by design firm Nendo are probably whetting your appetite. These tubes of paint and pencils are completely edible, and the paint tubes are full of different sweet fillings. You can sharpen the “pencils” and use the shavings to enhance other desserts.

Nendo originally created the chocolate pencils in 2007 for patissier Tsujiguchi Hironobu. Art and cooking (especially the art of plating food) go hand in hand, and the designers considered this with their initial idea. They write:

We wanted our plates to show off the beauty of meals and desserts like a painting on a canvas. Based on this idea, our “chocolate pencils” come in a number of cocoa blends that vary in intensity, and chocophiles can use the special “pencil sharpener” that comes with our plate to grate chocolate onto their dessert. Pencil filings are usually the unwanted remains of sharpening a pencil, but in this case, they’re the star!

The paint tubes have an edible label that tell you what flavored syrup to expect. They range from green tea to honey to caramel. Nendo describes their new creation as “…design that combines the childhood excitement of opening a new box of paints and the thrill of opening a box of chocolates you’ve been given unexpectedly.” What a perfect gift for someone who is both a sweets and artist. Yum! (Via This Is Colossal and Yatzer)

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KERI OLDHAM

Keri Oldham‘s collections of watercolors are studies in familiarity and restraint. Each mark is deliberate, yet still manages to accidentally wander, bleeding and pooling into the next, happening upon a recognizable form.

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Calvin Whitehurst

Calvin Whitehurst’s analog collages take you to a surreal world where the world twists and turns in every which way. I especially like the politically themed collages.

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Stay Creative With Beautiful/Decay!

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Scott Hove’s Installation “Cakeland” Transforms Interiors Into A Wonderland Of Sweets

Scott Hove - Cakeland Installation

Scott Hove - Cakeland InstallationScott Hove - Cakeland Installation

Imagine using your wildest imagination to create your dream fortress. What would it have inside? Scott Hove has taken a fairy-tale, dream-world created entirely out of what appears to be pastel sweets and turned it into an reality. His sickening sweet installation, titled Cakeland, uses sculpture, installation, and paint to construct a dramatic scene of cake-like decoration with a rococo flair, only instead of stucco molding, this sugary paradise is composed of delicately placed oranges, strawberries, and swirling, white icing. His elaborate work completely fills the building that holds it, which is labeled with an appropriate bright, neon sign displaying the word “Cakeland.” I cannot decide if Hove’s work is so alluring because of its fluffy, pastel details or the fact that it looks exactly like it is made up entirely of delicious, edible cake!

Hove explains that his process involves taking dark undertones and transforming them into something inviting and beautiful…and what is more pleasant than a place that surrounds and engulfs you in this never-ending, candy-colored comfort food? Hove’s artistic process uses endless imagination and creativity to allow his ideas of Cakeland to come to fruition.

I walk around my house, and see imaginary pieces on my wall, and then pick out the ones that I would most like to actually see hanging on the wall. Then I use every and any type of material to scratch the piece into existence. So much about making a piece of art is creating problems and solving them.

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Katerina Kamprani’s Uncomfortably-Designed Objects Make Your Life Worse, Not Better

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Good design is supposed to make life easier. Ideally, it’s beautiful, intuitive, and useful. This can be said for things like Apple products, for instance, but the same doesn’t apply to Katerina Kamprani’s The Uncomfortable project. The architect has applied the exact opposite principles to objects such as forks, watering cans, and rain boots.  Instead of helping improve our lives, they make it harder but being oddly contorted, ill-placed, and out of the wrong materials. This includes hairy dishes, a cement umbrella, and steps that lead to nowhere (paired with a door you can’t enter).

Kamprani (also known as KK) ponders if these designs are vindictive, or perhaps a helpful study of everyday objects. Her goal was to make them uncomfortable (hence the name) but technically usable and to maintain the essence of the original item. While they aren’t totally unusable, they certainly won’t improve your life. (Via La Monda)

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Devin Yalkin’s Photographs Of Illegal Fight Nights In NYC Get You Up Close And Personal Into The Ring

Anthony and other boxer connecting punches. (Old Fire House Soho, February, 2012)

Anthony and other boxer connecting punches. (Old Fire House Soho, February, 2012)

The crowd consisting of a large number of Charlie’s friends celebrate as Charlie wins his match. (Old Fire House Soho, September, 2012)

The crowd consisting of a large number of Charlie’s friends celebrate as Charlie wins his match. (Old Fire House Soho, September, 2012)

Two boxers pair up before their match. (Old Fire House Soho, September, 2012)

Two boxers pair up before their match. (Old Fire House Soho, September, 2012)

Ring girl entertaining the crowd in-between rounds. (Old Fire House Soho, February, 2012)

Ring girl entertaining the crowd in-between rounds. (Old Fire House Soho, February, 2012)

Photographer Devin Yalkin points an unflinching eye to the underground world of illegal fight nights, capturing their raw intensity. These “Friday Night Throwdowns” happen in secret locations and venues all over New York City. In Yalkin’s series The Old One Two, this hidden world is revealed through intimate, black and white photographs with a Film Noir flavor to them. This powerful series gets you up close and personal to the fighters and the erupting crowd cheering them on. The compositions in this series can be as hazy and chaotic as the fight itself, capturing the true atmosphere of these fight nights. You can see the unrefined aggressiveness and brutality between the fighters, but also feel the excitement and energy from the audience.

Devin Yalkin allows us to take place of the spectator, seeing every bead of sweat and drop of blood on the skin of the fighters. The high tension and motion happening during these Friday Night Throwdown’s can be felt in each photograph. It is as if we are standing next to each eccentric character; the screaming fan, the eager fighter, or the elusive woman in lingerie whose role is somewhat unknown. All of the individuals shown in Yalkin’s series seem to come from all walks of life, having only the love of the fight connecting them.

Make sure to check out Devin Yalin’s new strange and beautiful series Abductions, which captures ominous scenes of which we cannot place, mysterious and alluring.
(via Featureshoot)

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