Get Social:

B/D’s Best of 2010- Shadow Art

tim noble and sue webster metal fucking rats
It is time to up your game, shadow puppeteers. This morning presents you with some shadow art that will challenge your routine. The main artists featured here are Kumi Yamashita plus the art team Tim Noble and Sue Webster (who are responsible for the above image). Even if you’re afraid of your own shadow, don’t miss out on the goodies after the jump.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Swarming Drones Make 3D Light Art in the Sky

ars_electronica-install6

At the intersection of art and technology Austria-based Ars Electronica Futurelab has developed a method for making responsive light art in the sky. “Spaxels (a portmanteau word from space pixels) are LED-equipped quadcopters. They make up a swarm of drones that can ‘draw’ three-dimensional figures in midair.” A cross between fireworks and a screensaver, the quadcopters move in precision routines to make 3d light sculptures in the sky.

Flying through the air, the Spaxels look like UFOs, strange glowing objects in the sky. Because they’re controlled, though, they are capable of creating endless permutations. In London, they drew the Star Trek logo near the Tower Bridge. 50 quadcopters performed “The Cloud in the Web” in Linz. The Emirate of Sharjah saw multiple formation flights in “Clusters of Light,” part of a celebration of the start of its term as Islamic Capital of Culture.

“Clusters of Light’ gives an account of the life of the Prophet Mohammed and the early history of Islam. While the cast acted out the narrative on stage, the LED-studded spaxels visualized it in the sky above. In this role, the spaxels formed visual elements such as an arc spanning the amphitheater and the words of God falling from the heavens like drops of rain.” (Source)

Gracefully swooping and swarming, guided by gesture, the Spaxels mimic nature while pushing the boundaries of technology. (via Juxtapoz)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Chuck Close Interview

Charlie Rose interviews one of the most famous living artists today about becoming permanently paralyzed, his painting process, and how luck can be more important than success.

Currently Trending

Paul Graves

Paul Graves

Paul Graves’ work is lewd and provocative, but is really clean and “editorial” at the same time. When browsing his portfolio you’ll notice the often usage of a couple things: balloons, nudity as a costume, and mannequins. It seems he likes exploring human vice, which always makes for a good concept…and zentai (Youtube is currently down, but the video should be good so check back later to see it, haha)!

Currently Trending

Hillary Wiedemann Chases After The Sun

Hillary Wiedemann, "Possessing The Visual"

Transit of Venus, 2013 from Hillary Wiedemann on Vimeo.

Possessing the Visible, 2013. from Hillary Wiedemann on Vimeo.

Light has always been an essential element in artist Hillary Wiedemann‘s work; her earlier projects exploring the relationship between light and glass, often bending, refracting and shaping light, with regular investigations into the seen, the unseen, the visible, and the nearly visible. Her installations have quickly matured into multi-sensory experiences that seem to evoke a sense of longing for the ability to make light a tangible thing.

Currently Trending

Adam Sorensen’s Glowing Landscape Paintings

Adam Sorensen lives and works in Portland. His barren landscapes are litered with glowing mounds and vibrant streams set against dynamic skies. In his own words: “Landscape painting affords me a wealth of tradition and influence, and provides a platform that seems familiar and recognizable. 19th century romanticism, Japanese woodblock prints, and Abstract expressionism all factor into my works vocabulary. I work primarily in a reactive sense. A certain rock may lead to another, which in turn may lead to a specific tree. The scenes I end up composing, function as both utopian and eerily post-apocalyptic. Both of which can be seen metaphorically as social concerns in contemporary life. By inviting the viewer in visually, I ask them to recall where we have been, explore where we are now, and confront where we may be headed.”

Currently Trending

Ran Hwang’s Large, Zen-Infused Installations Made of Beads

Brooklyn based SVA grad Ran Hwang makes these huge, flowing sculptures with nothing but beads and pins! The uplifting, spiritual elements involved here work really well with the light, dispersed beads. You can almost see the birds’ wings flapping, and everything seems sort of frozen in time at some climactic, freeing moment. Obviously the Zen influence is deliberate. From the artist’s website: “The process of building large installations are time consuming and repetitive and it requires manual effort which provides a form of self-meditation. I hammer thousands of pins into a wall like a monk who, facing the wall, practices Zen.” I guess patience does pay off. (via)

Currently Trending

Mel Kadel

Mel Kadel

Mel Kadel is originally from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania and graduated from Moore College of Art in Philadelphia. She now resides in Los Angeles (and represented by Richard Heller Gallery), in a log cabin by the 5 freeway. She works using ancient papers, tiny pens, Q-tips and glue.

Currently Trending