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Lora Zombie’s Watercolors Inspired By Street Art And Pop Culture

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Lora Zombie‘s watercolors may look familiar: the Russian artist amassed a large internet following on sites like Threadless before recently branching out into the gallery scene. Inspired by music, street art, grunge, pop culture, and the color palette of Lisa Frank, Zombie creates these bright, youthful, and edgy watercolor scenes. Her work is comprised of a multitude of references that can be fun, gritty, absurd, or counter cultural, but each tells a story with fairy tale dimensions.

You can watch a video of Zombie in New York City for her “Blue Bird Lobotomy” show in November 2012 here. You can purchase prints of her work here. (via lustik)

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Aaron Blecha for KUR


Welcome to the World of Kur! from Aaron Blecha on Vimeo.
As usual, I have found more evidence that Scandinavians live in a clean, brightly colored world of smart design and cute concepts. Animator Aaron Blecha recently created this commercial for KUR, a Danish organic food company. What I like is that the entire animation is styled around the Kur brand seed shape (the teardrop.) This airs on TV, you guys. Our budweiser booby girl commercials look pretty bleak in comparison to this hypercolored world of dancing ants, happy crabs and record loving birds.

Aaron Blecha has some other lovely animations & illustrations as well.

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Chiharu Shiota’s Mesmerizingly Tangled Installation Of Woven Yarn And Keys Explores Global Forms Of Memory And Connection

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A mesmerizing, surreal experience awaits anyone entering the Japan Pavilion at this year’s Venice Art Biennale. In a stunning installation called “The Key in the Hand,” artist Chiharu Shiota has filled a room with webs of red yarn. Suspended from the ceiling, the yarn is tied together so densely that it filters out the lights above. Hanging from the mass are over 50,000 keys collected from people all over the world. Like dark, frozen drops of rain, they appear to spill from the stringy red “clouds” into two weathered boats below, creating a dual sense of breathtaking movement and suspended time.

Despite their seemingly simple utility, keys are intimate objects that we all carry to keep ourselves—and the things we love—safe. Invested with our deep trust and passed between hands over time, keys symbolically bind us together. The Curator’s Statement for “The Key in the Hand” eloquently describes this further:

In our daily lives, keys protect valuable things like our houses, assets, and personal safety, and we use them while embracing them in the warmth of our hands. By coming into contact with people’s warmth on a daily basis, the keys accumulate countless, multilayered memories that dwell within us. Then at a certain point we entrust the keys, packed with memories, to others who we trust to look after the things that are important to us. (Source)

The keys represent a collection of human feelings, while the yarn visualizes their immaterial connections across time and space. Furthermore, while far removed from their international owners and original purposes, the keys also embody emotions and memories on a transcultural, transnational scale, as they are webbed together without perceptible distinctions of race, class, gender, or nation. As all the keys fall perpetually into the same ancient boats (which are described as “two hands catching a rain of memories”), Shiota’s installation beautifully visualizes a global form of connection spanning borders and generations. (Source). As the Curator’s Statement movingly concludes:

I look forward to watching as The Key in the Hand, an installation that forges a link between a space made up of keys, yarn, and two boats, and photographs and videos of children, transcends national, cultural, linguistic, and political contexts, and emotionally arouses countless visitors from all over the world. (Source)

Born in Japan, Shiota has been based in Berlin for the last two decades. Visit her website to see more fascinating large-scale installations. (Via Colossal)

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Illustrations of Pop Culture Figures Dancing by Jesse Lonergan

 

Illustrator and comics artist Jesse Lonergan is drawing a “Dancer a Day”. Every day, he draws an icon from movies, music, cartoons, pop culture, etc. in a “dancing pose”. He posts the quick sketches to his “Dancer a Day” blog. Just a really fun, loose project. Who doesn’t dig the image of a groovy Hannibal Lecter or a b-boy Gonzo? What about a super fab “The Dude”, or Godzilla and the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man cutting a rug on top of a metropolis? Some more selections after the jump and head over to the page itself, where Lonergan’s already amassed a pretty large collection of dancers. (via)

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Ryan Wallace

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Inspired by singularities, LHC and other high science, Ryan Wallace creates complex abstract images based on visual data. Nerdy? Yes. Completely beautiful? Also, Yes. Keep an eye out on this young New Yorker. Upcoming projects include a group show @ Cinders, a solo exhibitions @ Morgan Lehman, and a curatorial endeavor @ Raid Projects LA.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Baaa

 

I’ve been dealing with food poisoning all morning but I mustered enough energy to post this lil trippy video. Not much info on this other than “Experiments in ovine geometry” but it’s pretty funny and well worth a look. Watch the full video after the jump!

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Brecht Vandenbroucke Makes Us Laugh

Brecht Vandenbroucke creates beautiful drawings and paintings filled with endless narrative and a dash of humor.

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Arne Svenson’s Photographs Of Death Portraits Created From The Bones Of The Dead

Arne Svenson - Photography

Arne Svenson - Photography Arne Svenson - Photography

These sculptures are made from the bones of dead people. The photographic portraits of these sculptures are made by Arne Svenson. What results is Unspeaking Likeness, a strangely captivating series of death portraits, collected here.

For four years, Svenson sojourned from coroner’s offices to law enforcement agencies allover the country, snapping photographs of facial reconstruction sculptures which were built by forensic artists and molded from unidentifiable victims’ skeletal remains, with the intention of resolving crimes.

The narrative hidden behind each “face” is a mystery, and, as viewers, our own hearts tense with sadness when considering each subject’s lurid last moments of life. It’s almost too much; so, we reject the idea of reconstruction in relation to rejuvenation. It feels psychological, how we need to detach. The “face” in the context of Svenson’s portraits are not representative of an emotional life nor physical body; instead, it’s a mask or doll with a troubling echo, seemingly touched by the hands of Frankenstein.

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