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Leah Beach

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I know what you’re thinking….but, no. This is not Guerrilla Girls making a comeback. This is Leah Beach‘s most recent collection of work. Beach series is about stereotypes and rituals from American society; she used  gorilla masks to stand for what we, humans, evolved from. Beach is mainly a  film photographer and processes everything herself. Leach Beach is currently a student at the Delaware College of Art and Design.

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Julie Mehretu Assistants

This video consists of a series of interviews with Julie Mehretu’s team of assistants.I’m not sure if I’m disgusted or just jealous about the massive space that Mehretu has as a studio. Something about this feels too sterile and emotionless. What do you think?

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This Unbelievable Glass Table Is Modeled After The Ocean Depths

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For his latest project, titled the Abyss Table, designer Christopher Duff of Duffy London constructs a detailed cross section of the sea bed from sheets of glass and wood. Inspired by mythology, he designed the piece of furniture to look like one belonging to an ancient deity, capable of pulling up chunks of the earth for his own decorative use. From above, the table resembles a topographical map laid flat, but when viewed from the side, it becomes a multilayered and multidimensional model of a three-dimensional mass forged over millennia.

The brilliance of the Abyss Table lies in part in the conflicting nature of its form and function. By its very definition, the table is not an abyss but the exact opposite: a protruding surface capable of supporting objects. Here, the liquid surface of the ocean is transmuted into an imperturbable solid, and fluid space becomes sturdy and unbroken.

On the website of Duffy London, the preliminary image of the table, which will be released this fall, is accompanied with a line from Friedrich Nietzche’s “Beyond Food and Evil:” “And when you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss also gazes into you.” This oft-quoted passage, almost always meant metaphorically, finds a very literal manifestation here. Contained in this table, the dark, unknowable emptiness that consumes the human mind moves poetically into the home, merging its mysteries with the normal routines of domesticity. Each image shown here is a digital model from which the actual table will be built. Take a look. (via Colossal)

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Startling X-Ray Portraits Of Couples Will Haunt Your Dreams

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The student artists Ayako Kanda and Mayuka Hayashi of Musashino Art University in Japan recently unveiled a series of portraits of X-Ray and CT images of embracing couples. One might expect images devoid of flesh, readable facial expressions, and color to read as clinical and sterile, but the photographs are strikingly human: “X-ray images usually show the finite nature of our bodies composed only of matter. But these couples’ portraits reveal a pulse that isn’t normally seen,” the artists explain.

Indeed, the images do convey ambiguous and subtle degrees of intimacy rarely seen photographically. The two individuals, positioned side by side, become hard to differentiate; the transparencies and densities of muscles and bones causes the two figures to fuse, touch, and pull apart in unexpected and haunting ways. While their bodies are flattened in space, forced to overlap, the bones themselves become separated by dark spaces, complicating the idea of what it means to be truly intimate.

The series also succeeds in conveying something more paradoxically permanent about intimate love. As mechanical process of photography and X-raying is offset by the delicacies of fingertips and craniums, the fragility and mortality of the human body is revealed. Yet the portraits, because they are X-rays and not typical fine art images, carry a forensic quality. Intentionally or not, they use a visual language normally associated with medicine and anthropology, and they are therefore poignantly removed from the confines of time and space, grounded only in relation to one another. Like two human artifacts, they invite viewers to dissect and analyze their bond. The couples appear as if held under a magnifying glass or fixed in stone, intwined in a decisive moment forever. Take a look. (via BUST, Spoon & Tomago, Daily Mail, and Bestposts)

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Michael Pietrocarlo Captures The Beauty And Renewing Power Of Abandoned Buildings

Distressed Gothic

Distressed Gothic

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Show’s Over

Michael Pietrocarlo is a photographer whose solemn photos of abandoned buildings capture the beauty of ruin and the renewing power of decay. Three series are featured here: Rust Belt, Forlorn Faith, and Unmanned Posts. Rust Belt explores the communities of Buffalo, Detroit, and Pittsburgh, which struggled during the economic turbulence of the 1980s; Forlorn Faith shows us vast spaces of spiritual worship left in decline; and Unmanned Posts guides us through the dust and stillness of the Bethlemhem Steel Admin Building, which closed in 1982. In his images, Pietrocarlo both shocks and stirs the imagination by revealing what happens when places once invested with love, energy, and hope are neglected; windows break, ceilings crack, paints peels. They become breathless ghost spaces, engraved with memory and mystery, breaking down and moldering in silence.

As these photos show us, however, there is beauty in deterioration; skeletons of industry and worship become tangible links to the past, signifiers of a passion and a hope that has preceded us. Decay becomes the passage to renewal, both personal and shared. As Pietrocarlo explains further:

I am drawn to the mystery of spaces where longevity has defied significance: forlorn constructs ravaged by nature, time, and the boundaries of ruin. I discover and appropriate these “found places” in my photographs to expose the brutal beauty of their (inevitable) decay, exploring contrasting themes of transience/permanence, deterioration/renewal, and abandonment/reclamation.

[…] Above all, these acts of discovery and documentation help me confront my own struggles with mortality in an attempt to illustrate artistry in dereliction, hope in obsolescence, intimacy in emptiness. (Source)

Visit Pietrocarlo’s website, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter to follow his work.

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Michael Johansson

Michael Johnsson

Swedish artist Michael Johansson is probably the undisputed master of 3D Tetris. Look at how all the parts of that machine fit into each other! I love his play on the idea of materials and their assembly in the creation of average household and office-hold (?) goods- returning them to nature, bringing them out of nature…popping them out of and retuning them to their molds.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Free Dilda

It’s monday, I’m about to go out of town for two weeks, and I have a million things to do. This is a visualization of what’s going on in my head.

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Fiona Ackerman Faux Mess

I’m loving these faux messy paintings by Fiona Ackerman. I included the above studio shot because it’s actually hard to tell what you’re looking at if you just look at the paintings alone. I can’t tell where real shadows are, what’s collaged (there’s no collage in the work!) and what is painted with a quick stroke of the brush and what parts used a 00 brush and lots of patience!

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