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Jon Huck

Jon Huck - Breakfast series

 

Jon Huck‘s “Breakfast” series exhibits portraits of people along with exactly what they ate/drank that morning. Some of these people bear a striking resemblance to their food! I’m fond of these parallels, especially the one between the bald man and his hard-boiled egg. 

 

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Bob Staake’s Twisted Little Remixes of Classic Kid Tales

Bob Staake, the author and illustrator of more than 50 children’s books, has reimagined the covers of kid-friendly classics from the 1940s, 50s, and 60s, giving each one a twist that is often more PG-13 than G and always darkly comical. With a simple off-beat quip and a slightly adjusted illustration, those once comforting, sweet tales of little trains that could and hungry little catepillars morph into something a little more sinister and a bit disconcerting. You know what? You can take a look at more of Staake’s “Bad Little Children’s Books” after the jump, while I go find a stuffed animal to hug.

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SHINJI OHMAKI’S INTERACTIVE FLORAL Floors

 Shinji Ohmaki’s interactive floor installations are composed of traditional floral patterns made out of food coloring, laid on the floor for viewers to walk over, destroying it as they do so.
This work transformed with the passage of time, and the space too was reborn through this process.

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Saurabha Datta Has Developed A Device That Can Teach Anyone How To Draw

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A designer/civil engineer named Saurabha Datta has developed a prototype for a device that can teach you how to draw. The machine aptly named “Teacher”, wraps around your hand and guides it to the perfect line.  The project developed for Datta’s thesis at Copenhagen’s Institute Of Interactive Design, first came about when he made a series of devices that guided people through simple tasks such as hitting a few piano keys or drawing a geometrically correct shape. The breakthrough in Datta’s research is taking a concept once thought of as sci-fi fodder and bringing it into reality.

“Teacher” looks similar to the old lie detector tests that would record a person’s pulse rate when asked a series of intimidating questions. It doesn’t say how heavy it is or what the projected weight would be but to be successful it would have to be lightweight. Some of the other projects Datta has worked on include making an interactive car seat that can respond to your insecurities and a program called “moment” which records your feelings at different times of the day.

Machines and computers are known as aids in making our lives easier and less stressful. With this latest development we can witness their evolution as was predicted some 50 years ago in Stanley Kurbrick’s 2001 a space odyssey. Who can forget the calm voiced computer “Hal” who eventually takes over the ship and responds with emotional vengeance against the crew when it learns they were going to “disconnect him.” If they can teach people how to draw what could be next on the horizon? Teaching you how to be a neurosurgeon or a concert pianist? Only time will tell. (via Juxtapoz)

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MANUEL FERNÁNDEZ

Using dilluted paint and an air compressor, Manuel Fernandez creates fluid landscapes that walk the fine line between abstraction and representation.

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The Street Art (Literally On-the-Street Art) Of Roadsworth

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The subtly subversive work of artist Roadsworth fits well in the long history of street art.  However, rather than finding his art on the wall, you’ll need to look down.  Roadsworth, as his name suggests, sticks to asphalt.  Making slight additions with paint to the language of road symbols, Roadsworth provides drivers and pedestrians alike with brain-interruptions for the morning commute.  Roadsworth explains:

“The ubiquitousness of the asphalt road and the utilitarian sterility of the “language” of road markings provided fertile ground for a form of subversion that I found irresistible. I was provoked by a desire to jolt the driver from his impassive and linear gaze and give the more slow-moving pedestrian pause for reflection. The humourlessness of the language of the road not to mention what I consider an absurd reverence for the road and “car culture” in general made for an easy form of satire.” [via]

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Anna Bellman’s Cut Paper Street Maps Puts A Minimalist Spin On Cartography

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Anna Maria Bellman intricately translates cartography into her own unique style by simplifying their elements into positive and negative space. She cuts precise slices into paper, constructing sections of maps of cities all over the world. Each hand cut incision represent paths on a map, building up the framework for a city. The artist’s work is heavily influenced from her extensive travels. Originally hailing from Germany, she has adventured to an impressive amount of cities including London, Berlin, New York, Paris, and Rome, just to name a few. All of these incredibly complex and diverse cities are represented in her work as a black and white composition of crisscrossing lines, intersecting and forming the streets and rivers.

Many of her cutout maps do not even appear as such, but rather an abstract grid of geometric lines, forming different shapes and patterns like tapestries. When the light shines through Anna Bellman’s maps, you can see their shadows creating a three-dimensional affect. Having explored more wilderness destinations as well, Bellman’s other works are highly floral and inspired from lush nature. Her nature-filled works include amazing patterns cut by hand, as intricate and delicate as those found naturally in the wild. Although Anna Bellman’s body of work can represent two ends of the spectrum, nature and city, the continuous monochromatic choice of using white paper unifies her brilliant work.

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B/D Apparel Artist Interview: Steve Bonner

Steve Bonner

ABOVE: Steve's B/D Apparel design, "Unknown Voyage." BELOW: Steve working in his studio.

This week’s Beautiful/Decay Apparel Artist Interview features Steve Bonner, who contributed the nautical themed  “Unknown Voyage” shirt to our Spring 2010 collection. With its art deco flourishes, the shirt hearkens back to the golden age of glamorous cruises in the 1930’s, when tuxedoed and ball-gowned movie stars might be seen in the dining hall, or red-lipped starlets might sip a cocktail or two sunbathing on the deck. Today, the T-shirt would look great with your favorite pair of Docker’s and boating shoes- or just hanging around town. Steve’s work is almost exclusively digital, focusing on sleek and creative typography. Read the full interview to find out the one activity Steve devotes an hour to every day (and that every emerging artist should do as well), how he stays inspired, and more.

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