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Barbie-Inspired Photographs of a Loveless Marriage

As part of our partnership with Feature Shoot, Beautiful/Decay is sharing  the work of Dina Goldstein.

Vancouver-based photographer Dina Goldstein shoots for magazines and ad agencies around the world. Her series, In the Doll House, examines the less than perfect life of B and K. B is a super doll, the most successful doll in the world. Her partner K is grappling with his sexuality and finds himself in a loveless marriage. He struggles with his position in the household and faces his lack of authenticity.

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Improve Your Sexting With NSFW Emojis

flirtmoji7 flirtmoji1 flirtmoji3 flirtmoji6

If you’ve ever wanted to sext using regular emojis, you might’ve found this prospect difficult. Well, sexting in pictures got way easier thanks to the new Flirtmoji, a visual language designed to empower people of all sexualities to communicate their desires, concerns, and of course, flirtations. The often NSFW icons include anatomically accurate genitalia, whips, chains, fuzzy handcuffs, and even some sexually-suggestive fruit. There are also special, specific collections like BDSMS, Snow Bunny (holiday appropriate), and Safe Sext.

Flirtmoji was created by a group of designers and developers whose mission is to give people playful, inclusive, and functional sex emoji. In an interview with The Verge, artist Katy McCarthy explains: “I wanted the Flirtmoji to be sexy,” she said. “Even if it’s not my thing, necessarily … it’s someone else’s thing and it’s sexy to them.”

Regular emojis are criticized for their lack of diversity, and McCarthy and her friends were cognisant of that when designing. “My friends and I are not accurately represented in emoji,” she said, “and it’s frustrating. And particularly with sex, we felt that it was so crucial that everyone feel sexually represented.”

You won’t find these emojis in the app store. Instead, via their website, Flirtmoji has a selection of free emojis as well as themed collections for $.99 each. So, whether you’re an avid sexter or not, it’s worth checking out their icons simply from a design perspective. They show just how much can be said with relatively little visual information.

Nowadays, as more and more people express sexual desires through non-verbal, electronic communication, Flirtmoji is valuable. It’s a straight-forward, explicit, and fun way to have clear communication about this important topic. (Via Bustle and The Verge)

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Mark McKeague – Twitter Radio


TwitterRadio from Mark McKeague on Vimeo.
 

I wish i had the knowledge to create something as beautiful as this. The project Mark created allows him to tune in to twitter posts in real-time using the analog radio. You can use the knob to scan “stations”, which are different twitter posts. Amazing, amazing, amazing.  He used an arduino board and lot of grey matter at SARc.

 

Also, here is an interesting programmatic response to Mark’s project which integrates twitter and youtube. TwiTV click on the top right black square to flip channels. Graphics are kinda shabby though.

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Sarah Doyle

Sarah Doyle

I love you, Sarah Doyle. I love your obsession with celebrity, your ability to draw/paint/whatever on mirrors, your perfect way in attacking myspace “talk”…. and of course, your affinity with the king, Michael Jackson. Sarah Doyle makes art from what us girls draw in class instead of take notes, but times infinity. Keep it up.

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Enchanting Flower Lamps That Bloom With Life And Light

Studio DRIFT - Installation

Studio DRIFT - Installation

Studio DRIFT - Installation

Studio DRIFT, an artistic team from the Netherlands, has created lamps that blossom and twirl like flowers. “We’ve always been very fascinated by movements in nature, and this is how we started the project that we call Shylight,” the team says.

Part inspiration from the elegant lines of the natural world and part engineering craftsmanship, Shylight is an immediately captivating and evocative installation. The lamps are made from silk, billowing and swirling as they descend 30 feet (9 meters) from the ceiling. The name Shylight is apt: The lamps’ blossoms open invitingly then close again as they retreat, as though they’ve thought twice about being too forward.
“Shylight is a performative sculpture,” says Studio DRIFT in their short video. “When you enter the space, it becomes kind of a dance that is performed in front of you.”
Though Shylight is by turns an installation, a sculpture, and a dance performance, it’s also interactive in a way. The form and beauty of the piece is immediately accessible to the audience, drawing out an emotional reaction and sense of wonder that might not be otherwise possible. Studio DRIFT says:

“The satisfaction in our work comes from the moment the audience engages with the piece and they forget where they are, who they are, and they discover this new world between nature and technology.” (via This Is Colossal)

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The Multiple Exposure Portraits of Sara K Byrne

Sara K Byrne photography8 Sara K Byrne photography5

Sara K Byrne photography2

The work of Sara K Byrne is definitely multilayered.  Her images are double exposures – a technique that originated with film cameras.  Basically a segment of film would be exposed to light twice.  The darker areas in the first photograph would record light in the second photograph.  Byrne uses a digital camera, one of a handful of models that can perform the same technique.  In addition to more examples of her work on her website, you’ll find a tutorial on how to recreate the effect. [via]

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How Conservators Repaired The 10 Million Dollar Punched Monet Painting

Monet repair - Art news

The painting after it was punched in 2012

Monet repair - Art news

Stabilizing the painting

Monet repair - Art news

Material testing

Monet repair - Art news

Securing the paint layer

In June 2012, a man named Andrew Shannon walked calmly into the National Gallery of Ireland in Dublin, and after approaching Monet’s Argenteuil Basin with a Single Sailboat (1874), he put his fist through it. To Shannon, the act of vandalism was a way to “get back at the state” — by punching a famous, 141-year-old painting, appraised (before the damage) at $10 million (Source). In court, he claimed he had fainted and fallen onto painting; video surveillance later revealed the act was deliberate. Recently, in December 2014, Shannon was sentenced to 5 years.

Since that day in 2012, conservators at the National Gallery have been hard at work trying to restore the painting to its former, beautiful, impressionist state — as Monet intended it. The damage was severe; the painting was split open in the middle, the torn pieces twisting outwards. The first step was to collect the tiny fragments that were on the painting’s surface and the ground nearby. Fragments that were found were then collected and classified under a microscope, as the conservators tried to figure out where they fitted into the painting. 7% of the fragments, however, were too small to be identified; these were sent to a lab and tested with a chemical staining dye, to figure out what types of materials Monet used.

The actual repair process was a long and delicate one. First, the painting was placed onto a padded cushion, and the front was covered with a conservation-grade tissue that was adhered to the surface of the painting using water-based, animal glue to stabilize it while it was being fixed. The actual “surgery” proceeded like this:

“With the aid of a high-powered microscope and appropriately small tools, the tear edges were carefully aligned thread-by-thread. Re-joining of the realigned, broken canvas fibres involved applying a specially formulated adhesive to achieve a strong but reversible bond between the thread ends. This adhesive material has been used and developed by painting conservators in Germany over the past 40 years.

Examples shown here include small steel surgical tools for working on tiny areas using a microscope; mini hot spatula for applying controlled and localised heat to the painting; warming plate and glass containers for keeping adhesive at a consistent temperature. Hydrated collagen adhesive was made in-studio.” (Source)

After delicately suturing the canvas back together, the conservators then went through and pieced the fragments back in. Gesso and watercolor were used to retouch the areas where there were still missing fragments. To make sure the painting is preserved for the future, the conservators built a climate box “to reduce exposure of the painting to environmental fluctuations” (Source). The box includes a humidity buffer as another preventative measure.

It was a long and delicate process, but despite the extent of the trauma, the repair was a success. Check out the National Gallery’s website for a longer description of the restoration project. More pictures of the process after the jump. (Via Gizmodo).

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Made With Color Presents: Marie Irmgard’s Gestural Paintings Sway Between Abstraction And Representation

Karen and Kim, acrylic on canvas, 80 x 70 cm

untitled, acrylic on canvas, 150 x 140 cm (2)

Hey Joni, acrylic on canvas, 55 x 60 cm

Premiere website builder Made With Color and Beautiful/Decay have teamed up yet again to bring you exclusive artist features. Each week we join forces to bring you some of the most exciting artists and designers working today who use Made With Color to create their clean and sleek websites. Website builder Made With Color doesn’t just help artists create minimal and mobile/tablet responsive websites but allows them to do so in a few minutes without having to touch a line of code.This week we are happy to share the work of talented painter Marie Irmgard.

Berlin based artist Marie Irmgard’s paintings are a dizzying swirl of gesture, form, and abstraction. Each painting is suspended in a state between abstraction and depiction, ever fluctuating between now-you-see-it, now-you-don’t. Both the subject matter and the method of the paintings contains the tensions of contradiction – the paintings are created in an madman’s spontaneous loss of control and at the same time the precise brushstrokes and compositions shows extreme control.

There is something violent and dangerous about Irmgard’s paintings – her still-life flower paintings is in the borderline of beauty, death and decay and fluctuates between the repulsive and the seductive, objects decaying into abstraction.

Irmgard’s source material is combining history and story; autobiographical reminisces are put alongside with present day commercials. Pieces of a Delacroix painting are transformed into turbulent layers and swirls in a contradicting combination of eloquence and clumsiness. She uses trash form her studio, organic waste, broken mechanical objects to create a hybrid iconography that is full of melancholy but also hope. Irmgard uses acrylic and ink and will often leave her work in big jugs or bathtubs – so that both the wooden frame and the canvas are soaked in paint-water. Up to the point where both the wood and the cloth is almost decomposing – she will experiment in just how worn and ugly can you make a piece and still save it – how much can you kill a painting and still bring it back to life.

See more of Marie Irmgard’s paintings on her new site built on the Madewithcolor.com website building platform here.

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