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Toyin Odutola

 

Toyin Odutola’s arresting drawings map every curve, line, and pore on the human body.

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Linda Hall’s Beautifully Grim Textile Animal Sculptures Embody Pain, Healing, And Spiritual Hybridity

Gallery Collage

Gallery Collage

Mamma Mask for Neglected Dog Across the Street

Mamma Mask for Neglected Dog Across the Street

Pink Stag

Pink Stag

Demon Family

Demon Family

Linda Hall is a Florida-based artist whose textile sculptures blur the boundaries between human and animal, innocence and the grotesque. Like a taxidermy studio of preserved fairy tale creatures, fox heads and bipedal bearskins hang ominously, eyeless and empty. Using un-dyed tissue paper, handmade quilts, and other textiles, Hall gives her pieces a “patchwork” quality, sculpting a mix of twisted and fantastical bodily features, inlcuding warped antlers, multiple ears, and eerie, human-like grins. Designed like masks, puppets, and full-body costumes, Hall’s works are “containers for the spirit” that seek to deconstruct the human/animal binary in pursuit of a more fluid understanding of identity—one that morphs beyond the corporeal boundaries of species (Source). As she explains in a statement provided to Beautiful/Decay:

“Like a sixteenth-century curiosity cabinet, my objects aim to provide evidence of another reality. Many of the sculptures, domestic and wild, are constructed from collected handmade quilts and other textiles. These materials have their own intimate history, yet they are repurposed into charged spaces where humans and animals occupy the same space. Many forms show evidence of life and life events, such as wounds and the mending.”

The stories of “wounds” and “mending” are embedded directly into the sculptures through Hall’s creative process. Embellished with paint, beads, and flowers, the pieces are, in many ways, objects of curious beauty; like toys drawn from a child’s costume chest, they radiate with an endearing, imaginative, and anthropomorphized sense of friendliness. However, in many cases, paint has been plastered overtop of these adornments, creating a caked-on and disfigured appearance that signifies the messy process of healing and the scars left behind. Beautiful, lonely, and repulsive all at once, Hall’s menagerie confronts us with the familiar-yet-otherworldly emotional spaces that humans and animals both share—as well as the damage and exploitation inflicted on the natural world, despite these deep interrelations.

Visit Hall’s website and blog to follow her beautiful work.

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New Mark Warren Jacques Print

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Mark Warren Jacques just released this doozy of a geometric-nostalgic silkscreen. Mark’s directions for use? “Order; get excited for mail; tell the mail man thanks; open & hang on wall (near plants and sunshine if possible); stare at often until you become tired and ready for sleep; fall asleep.” Available for a mere $35 (along with some other nice prints) here.

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B/D Shop: 19 New Artist Prints!

Just in time for the holidays B/D present 19 brand new prints designed exclusively for B/D by some of your favorite artists from around the world. Each high quality print is printed on thick archival paper with the boldest inks for maximum color and resolution. Add a few prints to your collection today and make those bare walls disappear this holiday season!

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Renzo Razzetto

The illustrations of a free spirit and a wandering mind. How refreshing. In lieu of the “carnal” nature of these plates, I have to say “well done”! Is that “Cheesy”?
Its “refreshing” to see art on such a cathartic level executed beyond stick figures scratched on a notebook. “Cheers”!

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Seokmin Ko Camouflages Reality With Mirrors

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The Square is a series of photographs by Korean artist Seokmin Ko.  Someone in each photograph can be found holding a mirror toward the camera.  Given, the mirror is more easily found in some photographs than others.  Still, the mirror in somewhat hides the person holding it, the reflection blending in with the background.  This is essentially a camouflage that works by imitating its surroundings.  Ko alludes to this in his statement, and draws similarities to social situations.  Peer pressure for conformity and social norms compel people to use such a social camouflage.  That is to adopt behavior that mimics surrounding groups in order to hide a person’s individuality.  Still, fingers peek from behind the mirror – perhaps an allusion to the persistence of individuality.

Of course there are several ways to read Seokmin Ko’s work.  Like a mirror it reflects interpretations singular to each viewer.  Ko’s most recent solo exhibition illustrates this.  Interestingly the curater presents an entirely different approach to the series.  In part, the gallery statement brings out:

“Ko is an artist of his own time. The mirrors and reflective glass make more sense as portals to other dimensions—dimensions perhaps similar to ours or radically different.  The patterning reflected in the mirror is never a seamless match with the mirror’s immediate surroundings; these works are not about tricking the viewer. In Ko’s images, the human, as the carrier of artifice, is a kind of discrepancy and belongs neither in the natural world nor in the constructed world. This is obvious in the architectural photographs where the human presence disrupts the dehumanizing machine-made grid. Ko’s is a humanist vision amidst a world that has become foreign to its inhabitants as creators, but as Einstein famously said, “In the middle of difficulty lies opportunity.” Ko’s disruptions offer hope.” [via]

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Tim Lahan

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Tim Lahan is a New York based illustrator and designer who happened to float to the surface in our Flickr pool. His fun retro-style of work does exactly what he wants by communicating visually in a simple and fun way. Keep the fun coming Lahan, we love it!

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Chris Agnew’s Etchings Of Belief Systems

British artist Chris Agnew Predominantly works with drawing and a self-developed technique of etching into panels with oil painted details. Agnew’s practice is focused upon the cultivation of belief systems through legends, mythologies and actual events. The works take the form of intricate and highly-detailed examinations of specific locations where the origin or destiny of particular events are/will be played out.

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