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Barbie-Inspired Photographs of a Loveless Marriage

As part of our partnership with Feature Shoot, Beautiful/Decay is sharing  the work of Dina Goldstein.

Vancouver-based photographer Dina Goldstein shoots for magazines and ad agencies around the world. Her series, In the Doll House, examines the less than perfect life of B and K. B is a super doll, the most successful doll in the world. Her partner K is grappling with his sexuality and finds himself in a loveless marriage. He struggles with his position in the household and faces his lack of authenticity.

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Adam Harvey’s Design Solutions To Increased Government Surveillance

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Adam Harvey is an award-winning designer and technologist whose work deals with the increasingly relevant topics of surveillance, computing identity and personal privacy. Harvey, whose projects combine fashion and product design, computing science and programming, takes an artist’s approach to problem-solving – identifying a problem, developing experiments and possible solutions, and learning any number of skills to fabricate and achieve a solution that calls into question the nature of the problem.

Harvey, whose company ahprojects is based in Brooklyn, New York explains,”I became interested in spoofing and camouflage when cameras metamorphosed from art making tools into enablers of surveillance societies. This happened gradually over the last decade starting with the Patriot Act in 2001. To me, this document marked the beginning of the end of photography as I knew it from art history books.

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Sam Moyer

In a recent attempt to find contemporary artists making fresh, black and white imagery, I fortunately stumbled upon Sam Moyer‘s, washed out, subtle abstractions. These images, composed of bleach and ink, are soft and elegant and fair in scale. I want one. Many more after the jump!

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Over 130 Gallons Of Paint Dumped In Busy Intersection

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Dutch artist Iepe Rubinigh and the  Anonymous Crew took the term “street art” very literally with their piece Painting Reality.  The group, equipped on bicycles, purposely spilled over 130 gallons of eco-friendly water soluble paint in a Berlin’s busy Rosenthaler Platz intersection.  The cars then acted as brushes spreading the various colors through street.  An abstract painting detailing the fluid-like flow of traffic unfolded over the next several minutes and 2,000 cars.  Painting Reality introduced pleasantly bright color to otherwise drab asphalt.  More than that, though, the “strokes” of paint documented the moving life of a city.  Check out the video to the see paint drop and spread.

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Dasha Shishkin

Afraid of certainty, 2009, acrylic, ink and graphite on canvas, 58.25 x 71.25in, image via feuer site

Afraid of certainty, 2009, acrylic, ink and graphite on canvas, 58.25 x 71.25in, image via feuer site

A couple months back Zach Feuer Gallery hosted an exhibition by artist Dasha Shishkin and it blew me away. There’s a variety of elements in this show that combined together made it so convincingly complete and mesmerizing. Upon entering the gallery you’re greeted by a cascade of paintings that are assertive, bold, and large. Starring into each one I was moved by the riveting flow of shape and colors, the figures and non-figures flowing, floating, mending and blending into and atop each other. There is a golden hue behind each painting, creating a glow and brightness that accentuates without being loud or attention-bearing. The patterns found in the background, whether floor, or wall or objects are intermingled and webbed together with the patterns of clothing worn by figures outlined in blue, black, green and red. It’s a collage of disturbed action, with no clear narrative or motivation, all suggesting some odd surrealistic dream that is subtly sexy and violent, elusive and suggestive, simultaneously jarring and soothing.

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3,000 Ceramic Eggs Spread Out In China’s Loneliest Locales

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The Metamorphosis Series by artist Shi Shaoping is a poetic look at life.  Shi created 3,000 ceramic eggs over the course of a year.  Each egg weighs about 22 pounds and as a group come in at about 48 tons.  The eggs were then taken to some of China’s loneliest locales.  From grassland to beach, deserts, and mountains, the ceramic eggs were spread out on the ground.  The entire project was documented with photographs and videos.

In a way The Metamorphosis Series is as much a site specific installation as it is a performance.  Shi set before himself an intentionally difficult project, one that would entail hard work, a journey, and perhaps transformation.  Like the egg, these too are a symbol of life.  However, they clearly also point toward potentiality – the field of eggs seems poised to hatch.  The exhibition statement goes on to relate about the project:

“Shaoping is like a fortuneteller who uses the 3,000 giant eggs to remind people of the weight of life. The beauty of the work is the unpredictability, and the unlimited imagination it brings.  The fragile yet vigorous eggs of life emphasizes that we eventually have to respect every single living thing in the universe. The sands may cover the frost-glazed castle; the soaring fallen leaves may blanket the ground. The persistence and power of life, however, will fight against the mediocrity and itself. The contradiction is the language Shaoping’s looking for to express his world of Metamorphosis. This triggers the speculation and discussion on contemporary art and life value.”

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Alexandra Kehayoglou’s Carpets Look Like Lush Pastures and Grasslands

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 Alexandra Kehayoglou

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Argentinian artist, Alexandra Kehayoglou creates rugs that look like pastures and meadows. The grassland carpet seeks to mimic the appearance of naturally occurring, but fast disappearing Argentinian landscapes.

Kehayoglou grew up around textile artists, her family followed a textile tradition that was developed thousands of years ago in Asia Minor. After graduating with a degree in visual arts, Kehayoglou returned to her roots making carpets as her ancestors did, but with a twist. As varied as the grasslands and natural scenery of South America, the carpets are beautiful representations of natural and cultural heritage.

Carpet weaving is innate knowledge for me. It makes me feel connected to another time. It is a way of building meanings throughout my life and that of my ancestors.

Her creations carry a strong message of sustainability; these carpets are made from wool often found in mounds of leftover fabrics behind factories. (Via DD.AA.)

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Borondo Uses Unorthodox Materials Such As Smoke, Hay And Water To Create His Street Art Portraits

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Borondo is an unconventional street artist, using a broad variety of materials to make his murals that are mostly portraits. Both his technique and choice of situ are excitingly unexpected. In a few of his works, he has used the smoke from candles to create the markings of the images. Though it would be safe to assume that this is a difficult technique to have control over, he is able to mold the forms into recognizable imagery.

Another strategy he employs is using reflections in water to be a part of his images, and sometimes even as the main event. In one, he creates the image of half a face on bails of hay – something he had done at an even larger scale beforehand – and planted grass in a pool of water to complete the second half of the face. It’s a nice contrast between the dried hay that looks as if it was burnt, and the living grass in the pool of water. Although in this one, the reflection completes the image, in the upside down mural portrait, the artwork is meant to be viewed right side up in the water, at least considered at an equal importance to the painted image. (Via I Need a Guide)

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