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Artist Saeborg’s Farm of Inflatable Pig Women

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Seaborg, a Japanese designer and artist, chooses latex as her medium of choice. A blend of installation and performance art, her latest work is an “inflatable animal farm,” complete with blow-up cows and pigs as well as performers in inflatable suits. Saturated with bright children’s book colors, the installation also features somewhat disturbing images, exposing what seems to be a literal underbelly. In a slaughterhouse, a pig with prominent human breasts dangles from the ceiling, gutted and bled. Another photo from the installation shows a pig, partly eviscerated, posing coquettishly with a come-hither expression.

In the past, Saeborg’s work has been included in group shows that portray a female perspective on modern Japan, particularly colored by sexuality, pop culture, and humor. According to beautiful.bizarre,

“As a new driving force of the economy, these women now work for the modernization of traditional Japanese culture, a culture that was unknown to the Western World. This new feminine expression is based on ‘impermanence’ (a Buddhist concept) and is mixed with the attraction to darkness and the internalization of feelings.”

Saeborg’s inflatable farm certainly hits all these notes, putting the ideas of impermanence and objectification front and center. These pig-women are fetishized, yet at the end of the day, they’re nothing more than a commodity: so many pounds of meat. (via Hi-Fructose)

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Chris Maynard Crafts Magical Avian Worlds From Feathers

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Artist Chris Maynard creates tiny ethereal designs on feathers. His process begins by collecting feathers of birds (usually not of North America descent) from aviaries and zoos. He uses delicate, detail oriented tools such as eye surgery scissors, forceps, and magnifying glasses that have been passed down to him through his family. With these tools, he is able to achieve intimate levels of detail, crafting miniaturized fantastical avian worlds. His uses his work to transform the ordinary into something surreal and perhaps a bit magical. He explains that he would like the viewer

“to take away being able to look at the world in a different way…I want people to be able to take a breath and look at something a little differently, something that they know. Feathers are a universal symbol. Feathers for different people will mean different things, but generally, it means flight, it can mean escape, something we want to strive for, a bridge between here and the heavens. I want people to take their own message from it, but I think what comes out are some of those themes.”

The original integrity of the feathers is important to the artist. He does not manipulate the color or over arching shape with the aim to “honor the birds and the feathers.” Maynard, having a strong background in biology and ecology, has published a book titled Feathers: Form & Function. He uses his work not only to express artistic notions but also explains origin and function of his material. Each work is intricate, delicate, and whimsical.

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Stephen Silk

Stephen Silk began practicing gyotaku in 2008. Gyotaku is a Japanese printing method that uses actual fish to make art. Ink or paint is rubbed on the fish allowing an incredibly textured print directly onto the paper. The lumped paint and palette match the New Hampshire coastal seascapes in oil fusing a really cohesive collection completely reflective of the area and its subjects. 

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Kiva Ford’s Unbelievable Miniature Glass Jars And Bottles Fit Between Your Fingers

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Avid glass blower Kiva Ford spends most of his days making complex glass instruments for use in the science lab. After completing a college degree in Scientific Glassblowing, he creates some pretty wild creations. But not only does he do it as a professional job, Ford twists molten glass in his spare time too. As a hobby, he makes other kinds of complicated glass forms – these ones are geared more toward art and commerce. He crafts delicate, miniature versions of bottles, goblets, pendants, domes, vessels, Champagne flutes and vases, all made from glass. Any even though they are tiny in size, they don’t lack imagination or incredible details.

As a member of the American Scientific Glass Blowers Society, he creates custom made glassware for research and discovery. He makes things that can’t be made by a machine or mass produced – all of his creations are as artistic as the next. For Ford, there is no real difference between the two.

I get just as excited about scientific glass as I do artistic glass. The whole process is beautiful to me. (Source)

Enjoying a tradition started a few thousand years ago in Persia, Ford enjoys using the same techniques that haven’t changed – blowing glass over an open flame. He says he loves coming up with new ideas – trying to see what is possible, and what isn’t possible. He even manages to create tiny animals from glass and fits them into other glass containers – achieving something he says, he hasn’t seen anyone else be able to.

For Ford his main aim is to focus on one skill – and get good at what he does. And it is pretty obvious he is well on his way to being a full fledged master of glass. (Via Trenf)

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Alex Schaefer’s Portraits Explore Fears Of Death And Powerlessness

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Alex Schaefer, a senior at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, creates portraits that explore the surreal and dark nature of the human experience.

Through bizarre props and Photoshop tricks, Schafer creates the ultimate, dreadful parallel universe- a landscape that enables us to coexist with what most of us fear: loss of control, death, and powerlessness.

Although sometimes comical, the artist places his subject, a man, in several different scenarios that deem him weak. Whether he is being tied down and unable to escape, crushed by rocks, or lost within a television screen- he has reached an endpoint.

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Megan Whitmarsh’s Embroidered Paintings

Megan Whitmarsh‘s embroidered paintings and sculptures are a real treat. Drawing inspiration from Annette Messager and Niki de Saint Phalle they are energetic and youthful, but made with the old fashioned tediousness of hand sewing. She has a show up at New Image Art Gallery until the 20th, hurry and see it in person while you have the chance!

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A Street Art Story

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Street artist Mobstr produced this piece, The Story.  Each painted-over line of the story allows the next to proceed.  Much of Mobstr’s street art works on assumption that his work will soon be painted over – it relies on its inevitable destruction.  Like his story states, his distinct approach to street art makes use this “strange harmony”.

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dusdin!

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It’s hard to believe he shoots models and landscapes so differently. I can’t help but like it. Check out his portfolio online to see for yourself.

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