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Awesome Video Of The Day: Fred Tomaselli

Shot in 2005, this  video takes viewers on a tour of painter Fred Tomaselli’s studio where the artist discusses his elaborate process of maximalist collage and poured resin. Tomaselli throws everything but the kitchen sink into his psychedelic and psychological works from plants grown in his garden, prescription pills, to hundreds of magazine cut outs. The result is an explosive mix of obsessive and ornate pieces that delve into the darkest inner corridor of the human psyche.

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Interview: Kim Dorland

Kim Dorland is a Toronto based painter who examines the psychic, nostalgic spaces of his upbringing in Canada through sumptuous impasto layers. At once playfully calling attention to their own physicality, as well as the nostalgia of Dorland’s personal narratives, the paintings are at once visceral and expansive. Beautiful/Decay recently interviewed Kim about his artistic inspirations, painting technique and more. Full interview and images after the jump!

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David Zsako’s Scary Faces

Truly disturbing (and awesome) portrait collages by David Zsako.

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Matthew The Horse

matthew the horseMatthew The Horse is an illustrator from across the pond. Check him out.

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Sabine Timm’s Miniature Sculptures

Sabine Timm - Assembledge

Sabine Timm - Assembledge

Sabine Timm - Assembledge

Glass bottles, broken ceramic statues, buildings, and an oven are all things you’ll find in Sabine Timm’s work. If this sounds excessive, I assure you it’s not. All of these things are miniature-size and require no heavy lifting. The Dusseldorf-based artist uses found and vintage objects to assemble tiny sculptures and arrange items in an amusing way. The images, captured in photographs, don’t seem like permanent installations. Instead, Timm’s handiwork feels fleeting, like we’re seeing a scene from a play.

Timm often utilizes the same objects among assemblages. This practice weaves a narrative through several images, and we can start to imagine a world where all of these things exist. They are vignettes, depicting a fantastic yet logical place. A pile of small petals nearly cover an entire house. Broken ceramics are given a second chance by simply drawing a new body parts. Timm also solves issues like overcrowding simply by stacking houses on top of each other. Build up instead of out, right?

There is obviously a lot of play at hand in Timm’s work. Her sense of humor is very sweet and goofy; for instance, she adds a face to plastic containers, using a comb as a wild hairstyle. It’s has a broad audience and is amusing in a couple of ways. She’s giving personality to inanimate objects, which is absurd. Additionally, the things she uses to create these faces are ingenious. Timm uses a lot of toys, such as the trees out of a train set. It’s nostalgic for many viewers, but also fun for kids, too.  There is a quiet sophistication to her work. The fine details are refined and innovative, yet the attitude of the images themselves are very accessible. You don’t need a formal art education to enjoy Timm’s work, and it’s able to be appreciated on a number of levels.

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Sara Marshall Reinvents Corporate Logos With A Handcrafted Touch

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In a project called Brand by Hand, New Zealand-based designer Sara Marshall transforms sterile, corporate logos into something that’s warm and personal. Using a variety of scripted and hand-lettered type, she reinvents these logos and the feelings they project.

A current trend in branding leans towards flat and minimalist, but here, Marshall’s flourishes and textures are applied to YouTube, Coca-Cola, Skype, Subway, and more. She keeps the colors the same between old and new, but other than that, they’re very different. Burger King, for instance, oozes bespoke and twee. Skype’s scripted font emphasizes human connection with a more familiar, friendly feel. (Via designboom)

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Pinched, Pulled And Crumpled Wood Sculptures From Cha Jong-Rye

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Cha Jong-Rye sculpture2

The work of Korean artist Cha Jong-Rye looks like anything but wood.  Her large pieces hang on the wall as if they were draped cloth, strange liquids, and geological formations.  Her peculiar choice of medium undoubtedly references these and other ideas of nature and the home.  She painstakingly carves her work from wood, often from hundreds of small pieces.  She seems to crumple, pinch, and pull a material that’s especially rigid, typically found as a tree or house.  They’re temptingly tactile – if no one in the gallery noticed I’d nearly be enticed to drag my fingers across their surface. [via]

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Slinkachu’s Tiny Installation Work In The Street

 

Slinkachu has continued to carry out his poetic, mini street installations since we last checked in with him. The British artist continues to up the ante with each new, ephemeral piece. Employing miniature figurines and various objects, the artist stages tiny dramas (often humorous, and socially aware) in site-specific public locations. Click through to see some newer images of his “Little People Project” (previously) and some selections from the slightly older  “Inner City Snail” series.  

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