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Samuel T. Adams

Stacked, packed, and tacked collages by Samuel T. Adams.

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The Sound Of Decay: Matt & Kim, Andrew W.K., and Soulja Boy

This is such a bizarre mash up of acts that I couldn’t resist posting it.  Matt and Kim, Soulja Boy, and Andrew W.K. have risen from the dead to throw a raging dance party in a morgue. The mortician has left for the night, the limbs are fresh and there’s formaldehyde on ice.

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Gary Hovey’s Incredible Animal Sculptures Made Out Of Stainless Steel Utensils

Gary Hovey

Gary Hovey

Gary Hovey

Gary Hovey

Artist Gary Hovey constructs shiny animal sculptures by welding stainless steel utensils. Hovey uses the initial shape of the particular piece of cutlery – the curves of spoons, the spikeyness of forks, or the flatness of knives – to inform the overall form of the animal he is crafting. Each piece is unique – no molds are used to help shape his work. The most astounding part of Hovey’s work is that the artist has struggled with the effects of Parkinson’s disease since he was diagnosed in 1994. Since 2004, he has been welding flatware, and he finds producing and showing this work to be therapeutic. “I work when I’m able to move. Family and friends carry sculptures for me. But I still get to make them,” says Hovey. “I don’t think the quality has suffered, but it does take longer to make them. It helps financially support my family and it is therapy for me. It has allowed me to meet many wonderful people.” (via my modern met)

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kim joon’s Fabricated Porcelain Tattoos

Korean artist Kim Joon fabricates images of fragments of hollow porcelain that resemble nude bodies. Through a painstaking digital process, Kim coats the anthropomorphic forms in bold patterns from ceramic brands such as Villeroy & Boch, Herend, and Royal Copenhagen. What results are deceptively convincing surfaces complete with reflection and shadows.

According to Kim tattoos are not only physical inscriptions on the body but also signifiers of mental impressions left on the consciousness. Alluding to society’s weakness for material objects, Kim’s tattoo imagery reflects our obsessions and deep-seated attachments. The artist’s exploration of tattoos stems from his experiences tattooing his peers while in the Korean military. In his earliest works, Kim grappled with the notion of tattoos as socially taboo in Korean society. He created sculptures that mimicked tattooed portions of flesh. Using water-based markers, he embellished latex-coated sponges, creating anonymous parts divorced from the human form. In recent years, Kim’s work has neatly overturned the negative connotations surrounding tattoos in Korea. In his hands, not only do tattoos reflect social habits and desires but they’re also a vehicle for transforming the body into a highly aestheticized object.

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Photographs Of Abandoned Dogs Explore Artists Own Crippling Depression

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By photographing emotionally troubled dogs suffering from abandonment and aggression, the artist Martin Usborne chronicles his own painful struggle with depression. His recent series “Nice to Meet You” tenderly traces unknowable canine narratives by carefully placing the animals behind surfaces and materials: a wet glass pane, a cloud of smoke, pressed flowers.

In distancing the viewer from each creature, the artist paradoxically allows for a heightened level of intimacy with each dog; behind a haunting waterscape or transparent white shroud, each set of eyes glistens and each pointed nose seems to poke through the barrier, begging for closeness with the viewer.

In distorting space with long exposure times and unevenly textured surfaces, Usborne also blurs the notion of time; the animals appear ghostly, shadowy, and otherworldly. As each image leads us farther into this ethereal and lonesome dreamscape, we bear witness to the profound confidences of these gorgeous creatures, and they stare back, inviting viewers to empathize.

Ultimately, Usborne’s canine subjects recall our own murky and lonesome pasts, mirroring the dark places that we normally keep hidden within ourselves. In juxtaposing everyday statements like “I’m fine” and “I also work at the bank” with the charged photographs, the artist paints a portrait of isolation; he himself often repeated automatic phrases like “Nice to meet you” and “You look great” when in the midst of his depression. These animals, partially hidden by fog and fabric, serve as surrogates for we who hide behind words. If only for a moment, these vulnerable faces of dogs remind us that we are not alone; in lending us their quiet companionship, they become our confidantes. (via Design Boom)

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Stephanie Homa

Stephanie Homa

As soon as I saw these jumping guys on Stephanie Homa‘s homepage, I knew I was in for a treat! Her artist statement, below, perfectly describes her style:

“My works are of a spontaneous and impulsive nature. Inspired by the playfulness and imperfection I discover in everyday occurrences, I am interested in carrying these values into my work, intending an intuitive and instant expression.

I aim to visualize indistinct moments of perception, thoughts and ideas by creating series of swift and automatic works such as drawings and paintings. While experimenting with spontaneous thoughts, randomness and accidents in my practice, the boundlessness in the use of expression, material and format plays an essential role in my work.”

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Lorenzo Vitturi’s Hand-Made visions of the world

Italian photogprapher Lorenzo Vitturi describes his work as “hand-made visions” where each body of work consists of a completely constructed new world where each visual element is hand crafted  with the utmost attention to detail. For his latest project Anthropocene Vitturi created a strange industrial world filled with debris, strange colored horses, and surreal body builders. Vitturi say’s about this project:

“This project is the result of a reflection about the relationship between man and nature, as it proposes – in line with 16th Century naturalistic painting – a symbolic system able to visualize the intersection between this two dimensions.
Up to the early 20th Century nature had been represented as an unspoiled, pure space animated by uncontrollable forces;
today, after just one Century, nature has proved to be a fragile system whose survival is highly dependent on an increasingly pervasive and destructive anthropization.
In such a context, where all equilibria and “rules of the game” are being overthrown, how can we still depict nature and men? Nature is loosing its natural features, while men are increasingly taking control over the whole cycle of life.
Starting from this paradox, my project consists in a series of images where site-specific installations built within a derelict location play a central role. In this visions the “mis en scene” becomes a tool for representing a nature which appears less authentic and indeed more and more a cultural product.
Each image is the result of a meticulous process of scene design and construction. The materials used were scattered construction and industrial remains, natural pigments and fake plants.”

See more images from Anthropocene and some very nice behind the scenes photos of the construction of the shoot after the jump!

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Viktor Gårdsäter’s Graceful Photographs Of Life And Death

Viktor Gårdsäter lives and works in Stockholm, Sweden. He recently completed a series of photographs that examine the passing of time, fragility, and memories.  Composed as a fashion shoot, the underlying idea of life and death resonates in the graceful imagery of a calm and dignified protagonist. The artist explains, “Balloon man’s last walk” is a fashion story about an elderly man’s last day alive. We get to follow this man on his nostalgic journey through significant places and memories of his life, in a last walk and a farewell to his city. He is dressed up and in his hand he holds the balloon. The balloon works as a metaphor for death and in the end takes him to the sky.” (via)

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